Showing posts with label sock. Show all posts
Showing posts with label sock. Show all posts

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Follow Your Arrow Shawl

Follow Your Arrow Shawl
Follow Your Arrow Shawl

First and foremost: a quick thanks to Nikki from Zender Studios for taking these photos for me; you're a doll for helping (and lending me your shoes for the pictures)! And with that being said, let's get to some details about the pattern...

... like the fact that I should probably apologize for the fact that I made this delightful shawl using mill ends that I bought at the Edinburgh Yarn Festival, which means that I can't tell you *exactly* what's in the thing. However, I CAN tell you that I carefully measured everything I used, and added a 10% allowance to the values below, so you can find grams/yards/meters for every color, which should help you to choose your own materials (just remember: having the appropriate yardage is more important than the weight, especially for colors D & E [since those are my heavier weight yarns]). I also encourage you to view the pattern as a jumping-off point for your own color ideas; overall, it's made of 10 sections with 2 colors apiece, so the possibilities abound!

Speaking of the fact that it's 10 sections (and kite shaped, when laid out!), I should also mention that this pattern has not been tech edited, and since it's one of my lengthier designs I welcome any questions or comments about errors that you may find. Ultimately, it's not terribly complicated since I used the same pattern all over (a combination of garter and a mesh pattern), but once you add color choices and increases and decreases to the thing, I'm certain I slipped in my notation at least a few times. So again, I'm very happy to help with any issues you may find; in fact, I've even labeled each section of the design so that it's easier for you to identify any problems to me (just give me section and row number and we'll be good to go!).

Oh, and I know I'm being verbose today, but one last thing; I noticed, as I worked this, that it's easier to make knitting errors in the sections in which you're beginning with your color A, or the mesh pattern. If you notice that your counts are off, don't despair! This mesh pattern is VERY forgiving of errors, and as long as you correct your stitch counts by the end of each section you will be able to proceed, even if you've made a mistake (and, again, I highly doubt you'll find your error ever again). All in all - bon courage, and I hope you like your finished shawl as much as I like mine (IT'S AMAZING!). Also, if one of you actually makes it in the target yarn (ideally John Arbon Textiles Knit by Numbers 4 Ply) please send me pictures, so I know what it would look like if I didn't have such a strong attraction to the mill ends bin. Of course, even if you make it with a bunch of odds and ends like I did, I think it will turn out great just the same!!! :) (other ideas: scale it up with DK weight yarn and the appropriate sized needles if you'd like, or even worsted it you want a real sleeping bag of a shoulder wrap. and again, send pics!)

Finished Size: 75" long in total, 28" inches wide at the widest point

Yarn: John Arbon Textiles mill ends; White (Alpaca Delight, 70% Alpaca, 30% Merino; Color A; 120 grams, or roughly 510 meters/558 yards), Green (Knit by Numbers 4 ply, 100% Merino; Color B; 8 grams, or roughly 32 meters/35 yards), Orange/Green (unknown fiber; Color C; 30 grams or roughly 120 meters/132 yards), Dark Orange/Red (100% Merino; Color D; 58 grams or roughly 145 meters/159 yards), Light Orange (Knit by Numbers DK, 100% Merino; Color E; 100 grams or roughly 250 meters/274 yards)

Follow Your Arrow Shawl
From the side
Needles: One pair of needles in size US 3 (3.25 mm) (I used a 32" circular needle, but I think you should be able to make this on straights if need be, although they will get quite crowded!)

Notions: tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: I am a terrible person and used two different weight yarns in this shawl, as mentioned. Colors A, B, and C are 28 stitches = 4 inches on US 2 needles, the rest are 24 stitches = 4 inches on size US 4 needles. I am loosely averaging this to mean 26 stitches = 4 inches on US 3 needles for all. Like I said, terrible!

So let's get started! Using your color B yarn, cast on 2 stitches. Then, right next to those 2 stitches, use your color A yarn to cast on 3 stitches as well (at this point, that means that these two sets of stitches are not connected). Then, using intarsia color joins for all color changes, we'll begin our first color section like so:

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Little Birds Hat

Little Birds Hat
Little Birds Hat

Yet again the story behind this hat is simple: while at the Edinburgh Yarn Festival in March, I went on a quest to find the perfect silvery yarn for a hat design. After combing through all of the booths, I finally settled on the subtle luster of this 4 ply from Ripples Crafts. Then, of course, once I had the fiber picked out I had to figure out the pattern, and ultimately decided to let a play on a basic stockinette let the yarn shine through. So if you, too, have a gorgeous 4 ply at home this may just be the design for you! (or - even better - order one of the gorgeous colorways from Ripples!!!!)

Yarn: Ripples Crafts Hand Dyed Yarn 4 Ply - Burras (100% Wool; 400 yards [366 meters]/100 grams); Moonshine - 1 skein (I used 58 grams, or roughly 232 yards)

Little Birds Hat
A look at the finish.
Needles: one 16" circular needle in size US 2, one 16" circular needle in size US 3, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 3

Notions: Tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 28 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 3 needles

Using your size US 2 needle, cast on 154 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures roughly 1.5". Transfer your work to your size US 3 circular needle. Then we'll begin our main pattern, which is Little Birds from page 105 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Rows 1 - 3: knit

Thursday, April 27, 2017

A Is For Ascot

A is for Ascot
A is for Ascot - toddler size

Oh man, this is a project that I finished quite some time ago, but then I couldn't photograph and post it because my wild third child didn't want to get in front of the camera to model. And, of course, as soon as I FINALLY snapped these pics he also let me cut his hair, which makes him look like less of a goober than he does in these photos. However, his gooberness aside - this is a fun cowl/scarf project that's perfect for a kid who keeps losing his or her scarfs (since there's a slit in one end and the other end tucks in!). It will also, adorably, make your child look ever-so-slightly like a sailor. :)

Sizes: Toddler (Child)

Yarn: Lang Yarns Mille Colori Baby (100% Virgin Wool; 208 yards [190 meters]/50 grams); #0050 - one skein (one to two skeins)

A is for Ascot
Could I have put him in a less
colorful shirt? Probably, but then
he would have been screaming.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 4; one needle in size US 5 for provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

And now that we've gotten that taken care of, let's make an ascot! First, then, using your size 5 needle, cast on 40 (48) stitches provisionally. Transfer to 3 of your size 4 dpns, distributing the stitches as follows: 20 stitches on your first needle, 10 stitches on your second needle, and 10 on your third (24 on your first; 12 on your second, 12 on your third). Join in round. Knit in stockinette until piece measures roughly 6" (7"), at which point we'll knit one decrease row, as follows. Notice that the rows are different for the two different sizes.

Decrease Row - toddler size: [(ssk, k1) three times, k2, (k1, k2tog) three times] twice (28 stitches)

Decrease Row - child size: [(ssk, k1) three times, k6, (k1, k2tog) three times] twice (36 stitches)

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Rib & Braid Headband

Rib & Braid Headband

I wish I had a cool origin story for this headband, but the truth of the matter is that I was in the mood for a small project and I wanted to use my leftover yarn (the rest of this color went into the Zigazig Ah Scarf). Other than that, I went with a dainty cable to suit the light weight of the fiber, and a smaller needle so the ribbing would be nice and tight!

Yarn: Lang Yarns Merino 150 (100% Virgin Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #197.0085 - one skein

A better look at the cute little pattern.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 3, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

So let's make a headband! We'll start by casting on 144 stitches loosely, and then placing a stitch marker and joining in the round. Then we'll move straight to the main pattern, which is a variation on Rib and Braid Pattern from page 201 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and for which you'll need the following notation:

front cross (fc): slip 1 stitch to cn and hold in front; p1, k1 from cn

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Crystal and Pearl Cowl

Crystal and Pearl Cowl

Considering I'm quite pleased by the way this warm-weather cowl turned out, it feels like I should have more to say about it. Still, all I can think is: three colors! lightweight! lace! yay! So, you know, if you want to get excited about a lightweight cowl, try this one! Or not. You know, your choice. :)

Yarn: Maddison Bio Baby (100% Organic Cotton; 197 yards [180 meters]/50 grams); #06 Purple - one skein (color A); #03 Tan - one skein (color B), & #01 White - one skein (color C)

The pattern.
Plus a little corner of my outdoor table.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 3

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches on size US 3 needles

So let's make a cowl! First, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 152 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll move straight to the main pattern, which is a three color adaptation of Crystal and Pearl from page 266 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Row 1: using color A, purl

Row 2: using color A, * k1, (yo, ssk) 3 times, k1; rep from *

Row 3: using color A, knit

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Pomp and Power Cowl

Pomp and Power Cowl

First off: yes, I know it's a weird name! But that's only because, in researching the particular color of yarn I chose, I realized that "pomp and power" is actually a color of purple, and, in my opinion at least, the closest name I could find for this particular shade (go ahead! Google it! I'll be here when you get back!). And, ultimately, it's also not a bad name for this super lightweight, drapey cowl either, especially since the cowl made by knitting sock weight yarn on larger needles and has a very sophisticated look.

Yarn: Maddison Bio Baby (100% Organic Cotton; 197 yards [180 meters]/50 grams); #06 Pomp and Power (I couldn't find an official name, so I'm sticking with the theme here) - one to two skeins, and scrap worsted weight yarn for i-cord (I used a bit of the Lang Yarns Riva (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 115 yards [105 meters]/50 grams); # 0009 Rosa/Grau/Blau I had left over from the Building Bridges Cowl)

The lacing in the back, for reference
Needles: One set of needles in size US 9, two double pointed needles in size US 9 for i-cord

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches on size US 3 needles (roughly 18 stitches = 4 inches on size US 9s)

And now that we've got the details out the way, let's move on to the pattern for this delightful lightweight cowl. And let's begin by casting on 19 stitches loosely, and then moving straight to some transition rows, as follows. To work them, we'll need the following notation:

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Zigazig Ah Scarf

Zigazig Ah Scarf
Zigazig Ah Scarf

The inspiration behind this scarf is simple: there are so many chevron patterns scattered around Zürich that I've lost count. Even better, though, is the fact that this slipped stitch color pattern works up quickly and easily once you've gotten the hang of it, and looks almost impossibly good. Long story short, if you wannabe the the best-accessoried human at the grocery store, then this is the pattern for you!

Yarn: Lang Yarns Merino 150 (100% Virgin Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #197.0085 - two skeins (color A), & Lang Yarns Mille Colori Baby (100% Virgin Wool; 208 yards [190 meters]/50 grams); #845.0055 - two skeins (color B)

A closer look at the zigzags.
I mean the zigazig, ah...
Needles: One pair of needles in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches 

And now, let's make a scarf! Using your color A yarn, then, cast on 56 stitches loosely. Then we'll work a few edging rows, as follows:

Row 1 (wrong side): using color A, p4, k3, p2, * k2, p2; rep from * until you have 7 stitches left in row; end k3, p4

Row 2: slip 4 stitches with yarn in back (sl4 wyib), p3, k2, * p2, k2 * until you have 7 stitches left in row; end p3, sl4 wyib

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Rainbow Maze Hat

 
Rainbow Maze Hat
Rainbow Maze Hat
Size Toddler

The story behind this hat is simple: I've been hat-shamed for not sending my youngest to his preschool with a proper head-covering, so I decided to make one for him (to be fair, he's a very stubborn child, and has only recently been willing to wear one). And not only did the Rainbow Maze Hat turn out quite well, but he's also even worn it once or twice. Small victories, you know!

Sizes: 12 Months (Toddler; Child Small; Child Large; Adult Small; Adult Large)

Yarn: Lang Yarns Merino 150 (100% Virgin Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #197.0035 - one skein (one skein; one - two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two skeins) (color A), & Lang Yarns Mille Colori Baby (100% Virgin Wool; 208 yards [190 meters]/50 grams); #845.0050 - one skein (all sizes) (color B)

Rainbow Maze Hat
The pattern, and the back
Plus the baby's new jacket
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 3, one 16" circular needle in size US 4, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 3 circular needle and your color A yarn, then, cast on 114 (120; 126; 132; 144; 156) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll move to our ribbing, which goes as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 3.5" (3.5"; 3.5"; 4"; 4"; 4"). Transfer work to your size US 4 circular needle, and then we'll knit two transition rows as follows:

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Autumn Rose Cowl

Autumn Rose Cowl

While I love (virtually) all knitting, I especially love designing pieces with a certain person in mind. This cowl was inspired by one of my kids' teachers, who has definitely earned something extra through her kindness and patience despite my kids' occasionally, ahem, * energetic *, behavior. As an added bonus, this cowl's simple design shows off the beauty of the yarn, and is also suitable for beginning knitters or as something to keep your hands occupied during a good movie.

Yarn: Malabrigo Mechita (100% Merino Superwash; 420 yards [385 meters]/100 grams); #862 Piedras – one skein 

It's amazing what you can do with a few knits
and some purls!
Needles: One 16" or 20" circular needle in size US 2

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker


Gauge: 26 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 2 needles


Which brings us to the cowl-making! With that in mind, cast on 140 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll begin our edging rows, as follows:

Edging Rows 1 - 4: * k10, p10; rep from *

Monday, August 31, 2015

Pansy Path Socks

Pansy Path Socks

I was recently presented with the opportunity to design another pattern for our friends at AllFreeKnitting, complete with this Lion Brand Sock-Ease yarn. And, long story short, this is what I came up with - a dainty color pattern that completes a clean design. I also knit one of these bad boys on 9" circulars, which I quite enjoyed (especially with this eensy weensy yarn). Anyway, you'll have to visit AllFreeKnitting to find the pattern for now (link below), but you can find all kinds of pictures right here in the meantime!

Sizes: adult small (adult medium; adult large) (small corresponds to the following US shoe sizes: women's 5 - 7 and men's 4 - 6, medium corresponds to women's 8 - 10 and men's 7 - 9, and large corresponds to women's 11 - 14 and men's 10 - 13)

Yarn: Lion Brand Yarns Sock-Ease (75% Wool, 25% Nylon; 438 yards [400 meters]/100 grams); #100 Marshmallow - one skein (color A), #174 Green Apple – one skein (color B), & #139 Lollipop – one skein (color C) 

A closer view of these little snockerinos.
Needles: one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 1, one set of double pointed needles in size US 2

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch holder or scrap of yarn for holding stitches

Gauge: 30 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 2 needles


I know, I know - you really just want the pattern, huh? Well feast your eyes on the photos I've included below and then click through to find out how to make these sweet little guys!








 

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Sea & Shore Cowl

Sea & Shore Cowl

When I first started knitting this piece, it seemed very timely; the tulips were starting to bloom, and the weather was finally heating up. I even took the flannel sheets off my bed. Of course, every action has an equal and opposite reaction, so now it's freaking snowing. Before I start complaining about the cold spring, however, I should mention some important stuff - mainly, that this cowl is worked in two colors of sock weight yarn on size US 5 needles to give it extra airiness. Because the warm weather will arrive eventually, right?

Yarn: Schachenmayr Original Egypto Cotton (100% Cotton; 197 yards [180 meters]/50 grams); #00174 Leaf Green - one skein (color A) and #00166 Mint - one skein (color B)

A close up of the piece
Needles: One 24" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 30 stitches = 4 inches on size 2 needles 

So let's do this thing! First, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 183 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit a couple of set-up rows, as follows:

Set-up Row 1: using color A, p16, place marker, p152 (or until there are 15 stitches left in round), place marker, and purl until end of round

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Simple Eyelet Cowl

 
Simple Eyelet Cowl

I bought this yarn quite some time ago, on sale at the local yarn store. And I've been staring at it ever since, trying to find a way to show off the delicacy of the yarn in a compelling manner. Finally, I settled on this simple eyelet design, which brings a touch of class to a basic style. And while I don't have much else to say about the piece, I should mention - it was while knitting this item that I finally taught myself to hold the yarn continental style. The learning curve threw off my gauge, so I didn't get quite what the yarn package predicts. It's not a big deal, of course, just something to note if you're going to use the exact same fiber.

Yarn: Berroco Ultra Alpaca Fine (50% Peruvian wool, 20% Super Fine Alpaca, 30% Nylon; 433 yards [400 meters]/100 grams); #1214 Steel Cut Oats - one skein

The eyelets
Needles: One 20" or 24" circular needle in size US 2

Notions: Tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 26 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 2 needles

So let's do this thing! First, cast on 162 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following set-up rows:

Set-up Rows 1 - 4: purl

Set-up Row 5: p80, place marker, purl until end of round

And once those are done, we'll move on to the main pattern, which is Simple Eyelet Pattern from page 168 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. And we'll proceed as follows:

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Kids' Reversible Cocoon Hat

Kids' Reversible Cocoon Hat - right side

My five-year-old picked out this yarn ages ago, and has been bugging me to make something with it ever since. And after rejecting my first two designs (what can I say? the kid knows what he wants!), this fun hat finally passed muster. Even better, the wrong side of the design is just as charming as the right side, so the child you knit it for can wear it either way!

Kids' Reversible Cocoon Hat - wrong side
Sizes: Ages 18 months - 3 years (Ages 4 - 6; Ages 7 - 10)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Fingering (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 273 yards [250 meters]/50 grams); #9430 Forest Green - one skein

Needles: 16" circular needle in size 3, one set of double pointed needles, also in size 3

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 28 stitches = 4 inches

So let's do this thang! First, using your circular needle, cast on 128 (144; 144) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit 1" (1.75"; 1.25") in a k1, p1 ribbing. And then we'll get right to the main pattern, which is Cocoon Stitch from page 131 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. As you can see, there is no difference in pattern between the three sizes. And here we go!

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Little Ladders Coasters

Little Ladders Coasters. Er, coaster...

I suppose I should begin this post with a clarification; despite the fact that I called it "Little Ladder Coasters," I only actually knit one (the yarn is leftover from the Mirage Cowl, in case you're wondering. And I could have knit many, many more). Anyway, it turns out that knitting with a new baby is not easy, and one single coaster has now become an entire week's worth of knitting. Luckily, one is all you need if you're drinking alone!

Some pattern detail... with terrible color! Whoops.
Yarn: Regia Angora Merino (65% New Wool, 25% Polyamide, 10% Angora; 219 yards [200 meters]/50 grams); #7080 Fuchsia - one skein (color A) & #7083 Teal - one skein (color B)

Needles: Straight needles in size 2

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 30 stitches = 4 inches

Using your color A yarn, cast on 30 stitches loosely. Then, we'll work the following set-up rows:

Set-up Rows 1 - 3: using color A, * k1, p1; rep from *

Set-up Row 4: using color B, knit

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Mirage Cowl

Mirage Cowl

When I first bought this yarn, I had no clue how I was going to use it (well, I knew I would use the two shades together - I love this color palette). And then I made the Slip-Stitch Mesh Fingerless Gloves and matching hat and the Water Lilies Cowl, and I saw a nice opportunity to combine variations on the slip stitch patterns I used for those pieces to maximum effect. Long story short, while the pictures don't quite do the front slip stitch pattern justice, color-wise (the pink shows up behind the teal a bit more in person than it does in the photos), the combination of the two is quite striking in this closer-fitting cowl.

Yarn: Regia Angora Merino (65% New Wool, 25% Polyamide, 10% Angora; 219 yards [200 meters]/50 grams); #7083 Teal - one skein (color A) & #7080 Fuchsia - one skein (color B)

My attempted close-up of the mirage-like color pattern.
Or something.
Needles: One 20" circular needle in size US 2

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 30 stitches = 4 inches

Using your color A yarn, cast on 160 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit four rows in a k2, p2 ribbing, followed by a knit row during which you'll place your extra stitch markers 20 stitches from either side of your row marker. And then, we'll move on to the main pattern, which is...

Row 1: using color B, * k1, slip 1 with yarn in back (wyib) * until you reach first marker, m1l, slip marker, k2, and * slip 1 wyib, k1 * until you reach second marker; then, slip marker, m1r, and * slip 1 wyib, k1 * until end of round

Friday, April 25, 2014

Water Lilies Cowl

Water Lilies Cowl

Somewhat unbelievably, even after making the Razor Shell Fingerless Gloves and the Staghorn Fingerless Gloves out of my single skein of Berroco Ultra Alpaca Fine, I still had a bunch left. And because I love to pair variegated yarns with similarly-colored single-color skeins, I thought it would be a perfect opportunity to use up the Crystal Palace yarn I originally bought for the Starry Night Cowl. Long story short, the Water Lilies Cowl uses two sock weight yarns, a slip stitch color pattern, and a simple striped rib to make a nice, closer fitting design whose top portion is entirely reversible, for drape.


A close-up of the slipped stitch pattern.
Yarn: Crystal Palace Yarns Panda Superwash (51% Bamboo, 39% Superwash Wool, 10% Nylon; 186 yards [172 meters]/50 grams); #2004 Mint Print - 1 skein (color A), Berroco Ultra Alpaca Fine (50% Superwash Wool, 20% Super Fine Alpaca, 30% Nylon; 433 yards [400 meters]/100 grams); #12177 Kaffir Mix - one skein (color B)

Needles: One 20" circular needle in size 2

Notions: Tapestry needle and stitch marker

Gauge: 30 - 31 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Using your color A yarn, cast on 180 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Next, purl 5 rows for the edging. Then, knit one more row. And then, it's time to begin our first pattern, which is Corn on the Cob Stitch from page 54 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. And it goes like so:

Friday, April 11, 2014

Staghorn Fingerless Gloves

Staghorn Fingerless Gloves, with tweeting bird, to complete the natural vibe

Well, I'm still picking away at the same skein of yarn that I used for the Razor Shell Fingerless Gloves, and I'm still digging the results (and amazingly, even after finishing these bad boys, I think I'm still going to be able to put together a two-color cowl with the rest of my single skein). Anyway, this pair of fingerless gloves uses a basic stockinette and a pretty cable to create a bit of interest in the thumbs. And it's still such a lover-ly green!

Just one hand.
It looks lonely, doesn't it?
Sizes: smaller (for a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb) and larger (for a hand roughly 8 1/2" - 9" in circumference at the base of the thumb) - directions for larger size will follow those for the smaller size in parentheses

Yarn: Berroco Ultra Alpaca Fine (50% Superwash Wool, 20% Super Fine Alpaca, 30% Nylon; 433 yards [400 meters]/100 grams); #12177 Kaffir Mix - one skein

Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size 2, one set of dpns in size 1, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 30 stitches = 4 inches

Using your size 1 needles, cast on 56 (66) stitches loosely, and distribute between your three double pointed needles as follows: 20 stitches on your first needle, 16 stitches on your second needle, and 20 stitches on your third needle (for larger size: 20 stitches on you first needle, 26 stitches on your second needle, and 20 stitches on your third needle). Join in round. Then, we'll knit the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1 *

Friday, April 4, 2014

Razor Shell Fingerless Gloves

Razor Shell Fingerless Gloves

I've worked with this yarn before, and enjoyed it (with the Lady Lawyer Arm Warmers and the Oopsie Daisy Diagonal Hat). Therefore, when I saw it in this delicious brand-new-leaf green, I knew I had to bring it home. And the Razor Shell Fingerless Gloves have a nice open pattern that's great for spring, with the added benefit that the yarn overs give them a ribbing-like quality which makes them conform nicely to the hands. So, you know, the yarn is nice, the shape is good, and the pattern looks decent, to boot. And what more can you look for in a fingerless glove?

My husband calls this pose the "claw."
Apparently, I don't have a future in hand modeling.
Sizes: smaller (for a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb) and larger (for a hand roughly 8 1/2" - 9" in circumference at the base of the thumb) - directions for larger size will follow those for the smaller size in parentheses

Yarn: Berroco Ultra Alpaca Fine (50% Superwash Wool, 20% Super Fine Alpaca, 30% Nylon; 433 yards [400 meters]/100 grams); #12177 Kaffir Mix - one skein

Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size 2, one set of dpns in size 1

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 30 stitches = 4 inches

Using your size 1 needles, cast on 55 (65) stitches loosely, and distribute between your three double pointed needles as follows: 20 stitches on your first needle, 15 stitches on your second needle, and 20 stitches on your third needle (for larger size: 20 stitches on your first needle, 25 stitches on your second needle, and 20 stitches on your third needle). Join in round. Then, we'll knit the following ribbing row:

Monday, January 20, 2014

Starry Night Cowl

Starry Night Cowl

I fell in love with this yarn as soon as I touched it; the bamboo and superwash wool give it a very nice feel, and it knits up really nicely, giving the finished fabric a beautiful drape. And as far as my design goes, I started with a cables and lace pattern and then dropped the cables towards the top, so it would drape more gently around the neck. Ultimately, I'm sure a solid color would show off the pattern better than this variegated one does, but this delicate cowl still feels super-good on.
The shoulder. Here, you can see the transition
of the cable into the "starry night" eyelets
above it.

Yarn: Crystal Palace Yarns Panda Superwash (51% Bamboo, 39% Superwash Wool, 10% Nylon; 186 yards [172 meters]/50 grams); #2004 Mint Print - 2 skeins

Needles: One 24" circular needle in size 2, cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle (dpn) for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle and 3 stitch markers, or scraps of yarn to mark your stitches (this is probably the better option, given the gauge)

Gauge: 31 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's get started! First, cast on 248 stitches loosely, place marker or yarn scrap, and join in round. Then, knit 24, place another marker, and knit until you have 24 stitches left in your row and place another. Finish the row knitting. And before we get started on the main pattern, let's complete the following rows:

Row 1: purl, slipping extra markers when you come to them

Row 2: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

Saturday, November 16, 2013

Zigzag Cowl

Zigzag Cowl

Okay, last year I knit my mother a cowl out of a different color of this same yarn, and I was very impressed by its airy texture and attractive folding. So when I saw another color, especially one with such nice earth tones, I had to get it and try again. This particular cowl is really dang wide (roughly 15" - which makes it layer so nicely), and this variegated yarn suits it perfectly, creating delicate and even stripes. I chose to knit it on the shorter side so that it would sit close to the neck and keep a person warm, but with a few more inches of length it would suit warmer temperatures as well. And it's just so pretty!

The pattern
Yarn: Berroco Comfort Sock (50% Super Fine Nylon, 50% Super Fine Acrylic; 447 yards [412 meters]/100 grams); #1814 Dunedin - one skein

Needles: One set of straight needles in size 3 (fine, I knit it on a 16" circular needle, but that's because I can't stand straights. It's a back-and-forth knit either way)

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 30 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Cast on 80 stitches (you can cast on less, as long as you cast on an even number, if you don't want your piece to be quite as wide. you will lose volume, however). And now, let's begin the pattern, which is Zigzag Lace Trellis from page 190 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns.

Row 1 (wrong side) & all other odd rows: purl

Rows 2, 4, and 6: k1, * yo, k2tog; rep from *, end k1

Rows 8, 10, and 12: k1, * ssk, yo *, end k1