Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Zigazig Ah Scarf

Zigazig Ah Scarf
Zigazig Ah Scarf

The inspiration behind this scarf is simple: there are so many chevron patterns scattered around Zürich that I've lost count. Even better, though, is the fact that this slipped stitch color pattern works up quickly and easily once you've gotten the hang of it, and looks almost impossibly good. Long story short, if you wannabe the the best-accessoried human at the grocery store, then this is the pattern for you!

Yarn: Lang Yarns Merino 150 (100% Virgin Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #197.0085 - two skeins (color A), & Lang Yarns Mille Colori Baby (100% Virgin Wool; 208 yards [190 meters]/50 grams); #845.0055 - two skeins (color B)

A closer look at the zigzags.
I mean the zigazig, ah...
Needles: One pair of needles in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches 

And now, let's make a scarf! Using your color A yarn, then, cast on 56 stitches loosely. Then we'll work a few edging rows, as follows:

Row 1 (wrong side): using color A, p4, k3, p2, * k2, p2; rep from * until you have 7 stitches left in row; end k3, p4

Row 2: slip 4 stitches with yarn in back (sl4 wyib), p3, k2, * p2, k2 * until you have 7 stitches left in row; end p3, sl4 wyib

Knit these two rows until piece measures just over 1.25" and you've just finished row 2 of the pattern. Using color A, purl one row across. Then we'll get right to our main pattern, which is Zebra Chevron from page 69 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, plus some i-cord edging, and goes as follows. Remember to keep your yarn loose when you're slipping stitches, unless you're working the i-cord edging. Then you can pull as tight as you want!

Row 1 (right side): using color B, sl4 wyib, * sl1 wyib, k2; rep from * until you have 4 stitches left in row; end sl4 wyib

Row 2: using color B, p4, * p2, sl1 wyif; rep from * until you have 4 stitches left in row; end p4

Row 3: using color A, sl4 wyib, [k1, sl1 wyib, (k2, sl1 wyib) three times, k3, (sl1 wyib, k2) 3 times, sl1 wyib] twice, sl4 wyib

Row 4: using color A, p4, [sl1 wyif, (p2, sl1 wyif) three times, p3, (sl1 wyif, p2) three times, sl1 wyif, p1] twice, p4

Row 5: using color B, sl4 wyib, [k2, (sl1 wyib, k2) three times, sl1 wyib, k1, sl1 wyib, (k2, sl1 wyib) three times, k1] twice, sl4 wyib

Row 6: using color B, p4, [p1, (sl1 wyif, p2) three times, sl1 wyif, p1, sl1 wyif, (p2, sl1 wyif) three times, p2] twice, p4

Rows 7 & 8: using color A, repeat rows 1 & 2

Rows 9 & 10: using color B, repeat rows 3 & 4

Rows 11 & 12: using color A, repeat rows 5 & 6

Knit rows 1 - 12 until piece measures roughly 54", or desired length, and you've just finished a wrong side row of the pattern (you can be more persnickety about which wrong side row, if you'd like, but I don't think you need to be). Clip the tail of your color B yarn, since you're done with it. Using color A, knit one transition row, as follows:

Transition Row (right side): sl4 wyib, knit until you have 4 stitches left in row, sl4 wyib

Once that row's done, we'll do another bit of edging, like so:

Row 1 (wrong side): using color A, p4, k3, p2, * k2, p2; rep from * until you have 7 stitches left in row; end k3, p4

Row 2: sl4 wyib, p3, k2, * p2, k2 * until you have 7 stitches left in row; end p3, sl4 wyib

Knit rows 1 & 2 until edging measures just about 1.25" and you've just finished row 1 of the pattern. Bind off loosely in pattern, tuck in ends, and block. Wear while listening to the Spice Girls, pretending to listen to the Spice Girls, or just reenacting scenes from the Spice World movie in your head. I saw it in the theater, you guys. With a friend that asked every patron "bride or groom?" when they entered the cinema and then tried to direct them to a certain side of the theater based on the response.






29 comments:

  1. ADORE IT!!!! Thank you so much!

    Linda in VA (who just went to the yarn shop but will now need to go back to get yarn for this)...

    ReplyDelete
  2. Question - is this a fingering/sock weight yarn? And also - you used one in self-striping and one in solid?

    Linda in VA

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Linda!

      Nice to hear from you! :) And as far as your questions are concerned - first, this yarn is kind of between sock and sport weight (as a tie breaker in the event of unlabeled yarn, I use the Craft Yarn Council's page, which you can find here: http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/weight.html). And secondly - yes, I used a solid for my color A and a variegated for my color B. It's one of my favorite ways to work color patterns, since you have the single color to balance out any curveballs the variegation may throw your way!!!

      Delete
    2. Thanks!!
      I was wondering too about different weights of yarn (like worsted) but see your comment below...
      I was also thinking about how it might look to use a variegated and a solid?.... just to throw another cog in the wheel - LOL!

      Linda in VA

      Delete
  3. Thank you for this beautiful pattern! I'm so excited to start on it. I do have one question: If I use dk or worsted weight yarn, how many stitches should I cast on?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there!

      This is kind of a tricky scarf to change weights with, since the pattern is a 24-stitch repeat, which is pretty long. One choice would be to go with a single repeat, of course, for which you would cast on 32. Depending on your yarn weight, that would probably make your scarf about 5.5" wide. You could also go for a one-and-a-half design, and cast on 44. If you go with that and need help converting the pattern, let me know! :)

      Delete
  4. I don't really care for Chevron--But I really like this scarf!!! I think I've got another project to add to my Ravelry List. Thanks!

    4TruLady

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad to hear it! Let me know if you have any questions!!! :)

      Delete
    2. Actually I only just figured out how to put replies on this blog (I'm "tech-challenged"). I have often wanted to tell you how much I enjoy your designs and appreciate what you do. I have made several of your cowls and am trying to decide on a pair of mitts for next project.
      Thanks for all you do!
      4TruLady

      Delete
    3. Glad to hear it! I aim to please! :) And you can always message me on Ravelry too if that's easier!!!

      Delete
  5. Oh, please do not keep adding temptation to my life. This scarf is yummy, and looks like it has my name on the pattern to make.
    PS. I love your wirk, it is all very tempting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad to hear that! Although I can't promise not to keep adding new patterns... it's an addiction, it is! :)

      Delete
  6. This scarf is certainly a beauty!! HOW in in the world do you keep track of your repeats with 3 little boys in the house?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is "very carefully" a good answer? Also, I had to rip a few rows out... :)

      Delete
  7. I agree that this scarf has to go on my 'must-do' list. I also want to thank you for posting several pictures from different angles. It really helps me decide if a pattern is something I want to tackle or not. Keep up the fabulous work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you like the pattern! And I will certainly try! :)

      Delete
  8. Hello Tracy
    I love your design very much.
    Thank you for sharing your giftedness.
    I have one question: Why is my project so curly on the edge?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi! This scarf is designed with a faux icord on either edge, so it's meant to curl over a few stitches (this hides edges too). If your scarf is curly all the way across, then I recommend blocking it! :)

      Delete
    2. What kind of blocking method do you recommend? I am new in knitting.

      Delete
    3. Hi Julia!

      The method of blocking you use is most dependent on your yarn - if you used a wool like I did, or a wool blend, I recommend soaking the scarf in cold water for roughly 20 minutes, then patting it as dry as you can (you can also use a salad spinner! the only thing you don't want to do is wring it out). Then you can pin it to an old towel or blocking squares to dry (which are basically just those kids' 1' x 1' foam mats - I use some I got in Italy that have punch-out numbers!). If it's slow you can use a fan or something to help it along, but that's basically the process!

      Delete
    4. This is valuable information for me. Thank you very much! I used the same wool like you did.

      Delete
    5. Love, Love, love this scarf! Thank you so much for your generosity! I love the colors you use but wonder if the wool is "itchy" like my wool sweaters were many, many years ago or has wool come a long way?

      Delete
    6. Oh my goodness it TOTALLY depends on the brand/fiber/etc. There are still many itchy wools out there (and to be honest, I can barely even knit those ones!), but there are also lots of delightful soft ones as well. My favorite brand for softness is probably Malabrigo, although many merinos or washable wools are also pretty nice to the touch nowadays too!

      Delete
  9. Just got back to knitting. I was looking for a large zigzag pattern when I found your's. It is stunning. I just love the colors you used. I would love to use the same colour combination but I can't match the color of the Lang yarn Merino 150. the picture you show seems to be dark pink with some orange in it. The colors I found on the internet have different numbers but do not even come close to what you used. The pink (9) is too pale in comparison, the orange(159) is too orange and the red (60) seems too dark. Would you share your color ?
    Thank you so much

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there!

      The pink color I used is #85; unfortunately, I just poked around online and I see that it's out of stock on loveknitting.com and I don't see it on yarn.com either. It might be discontinued! However, since I'm searching from Switzerland all of my results are geared towards European purchase; you should try searching for color 85 too and you might have more luck with local results. Good luck! :)

      Delete
    2. Thank you so much. I'll keep looking

      Delete