Thursday, March 30, 2017

Reverb Shawl

Reverb Shawl
Reverb Shawl

First off, I hate to admit how long I've been working on this shawl, because, to be quite honest, I can no longer even remember when I started (nevertheless, I am 98% sure it was last year). And I know that may not sound like *that* long to some of you with years-old WIPs sitting around in your drawers, but I'm one of those people who loses steam VERY EASILY the minute I set something down, and will often literally throw out a project to ease the psychic burden of staring at it, unfinished, for too long (but I swear I've gotten better about this as I get older!!! really, it's true!!!). Anyway, what was my point? I have no idea, but I did make a shawl! And quite a shawl it is - made with worsted weight so it doesn't work up too slowly, the Reverb Shawl also combines twisted stitches and mesh for some interesting textural detail. So make one of your own, if you want! I will send lots of good energy your way so you don't get bogged down halfway through. :)

Yarn: Malabrigo Worsted (100% Merino Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #193 Jacinto - 2 skeins

Reverb Shawl
Another look at the pattern
Needles: One 32" or longer circular needle in size US 7
 

Notions: Tapestry needle, 2 stitch markers

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a shawl! Begin by casting on 3 stitches loosely, and then working 8 rows in garter stitch to create a tab. Then, without turning work, yarn over (yo) twice, pick up 1 stitch about 1/3rd of the way down along the edge of the tab, (yo) twice again, pick up 1 stitch roughly 2/3rds of the way down the edge of the tab, and (yo) twice again. Complete tab by picking up 3 stitches along cast-on edge; you should now have stitches coming from 3 sides of the tab - 3 along original working edge - 8 along the side (counting each double yo as 2 stitches), and 3 along the cast-on edge. Then, work a few set-up rows as follows. Oh, and you'll need the following terminology, as well:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Pink Ponytail Hat

Pink Ponytail Hat
Pink Ponytail Hat

A few of you have been asking for a ponytail/messy bun hat, and I'll admit there are two reasons why I haven't jumped on the trend. #1 - Hedwig (my fake head) looks absolutely RIDICULOUS when I try to put her lovely hair in any kind of updo, which means that I have to model any version of this hat myself. Not exactly my favorite activity. And #2 - when one designs these kinds of hats, one doesn't get to design the very best part - the crown. Even in the face of this sad, crownless world, though, when I got a request to do a ponytail hat with a pattern similar to the Cellular Stitch Kids' Poncho, I put on my big girl pants and got it done. Because I couldn't make a crown, however, I had to get a bit fancier nearer to the face. But if you want to make this hat with the Cellular Stitch and that stitch alone (you can get a better view of it in the picture below - it's the top part, with the holes), simply knit the ribbing and then knit rows 26 - 29 on repeat until your hat measures roughly 6" and you've just finished row 29, and then proceed with the remaining rows as written.

Yarn: Sommer Merino 85 (100% Superwash Wool; 96 yards [85 meters]/50 grams); #867 - 2 skeins

Pink Ponytail Hat
A better view of the back.
And my small, sad little ponytail.
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 6, one 16" circular needle in size US 8, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make one of these hats, shall we? Using your size US 6 circular needle, cast on 90 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the following ribbing:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 2". Transfer work to your size US 8 circular needle, and then we'll work a variation on the Wide Leaf Border from page 342 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns that transitions into the Cellular Stitch. I wish I had better news for you at this point, but sadly you'll have to follow the pattern for every single row of this hat, as follows:

Rows 1 & 2: knit

Row 3:* k5, k2tog, (k1, yo, k1) in next stitch, ssk, k5 *

Row 4: * p5, k5, p5 *

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Quatrefoil Cowl

Quatrefoil Cowl
Quatrefoil Cowl

What can I say about this yarn? The minute I saw the color I KNEW I HAD TO HAVE IT, even though this yarn weight (worsted) in a mostly-cotton blend can be hard to design for (Why? Because lace isn't very crisp in this weight, the lack of stretch compared to wool makes it less ideal for cables, etc). So I had to play around with a few patterns before I came up with something I liked, but I enjoy the way this combination of a picot hem and a basic eyelet design creates a feminine, but not overly girly, aesthetic. Of course, just because I used a mostly-cotton fiber doesn't mean you're stuck with that choice; this design would look equally good with wool, and would probably even take the right variegated yarn as well... 

Oh, and before I forget - special thanks to my friend Nikki at Zender Studios for helping me with the pics! :)

Yarn: Lana Grossa 365 Yak (66% Cotton, 12% Yak, 22% Polyamide; 159 yards [145 meters]/50 grams); #004 - 2 skeins

Quatrefoil Cowl
A better look at the eyelets.
Needles: 16" or 20" circular needle in size US 9

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a cowl! First, then, we're going to start with a picot hem. You can find tons of tutorials for this online if you need extra help, but I'll walk you through the steps here as well. So, to begin, cast on 96 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Knit five rows around. Then, work the following row:

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Arrowhead Hat

Arrowhead Hat
Arrowhead Hat
Pictured in Adult Large (that's why Hedwig's in
her big hair today)

The story behind this hat is simple: I have a friend who struggles to find a hat big enough for her hair, and I happen to know an independent knitwear accessory designer who loves to make people stuff they can't seem to find in stores (hint: it's me!). So, basically, the Arrowhead Hat is designed with plenty of slouch and two different sizes to accommodate as much or as little hair as you'd like to put inside of it.

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large) 

Yarn: Sommer Merino 125 (100% Superwash Wool; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #167 - 2 skeins (both sizes)

Arrowhead Hat
A better look
at the back.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, 1 stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 6 needles

And that makes it hat time! Using your size US 5 needle, then, cast on 112 (128) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 2.5" in length, and then transfer work to your size US 6 circular needle. Then we'll begin our main pattern, which is a combination of Arrowhead Lace and Little Arrowhead Lace from page 193 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Row 1: knit