Friday, April 11, 2014

Staghorn Fingerless Gloves

Staghorn Fingerless Gloves, with tweeting bird, to complete the natural vibe

Well, I'm still picking away at the same skein of yarn that I used for the Razor Shell Fingerless Gloves, and I'm still digging the results (and amazingly, even after finishing these bad boys, I think I'm still going to be able to put together a two-color cowl with the rest of my single skein). Anyway, this pair of fingerless gloves uses a basic stockinette and a pretty cable to create a bit of interest in the thumbs. And it's still such a lover-ly green!

Just one hand.
It looks lonely, doesn't it?
Sizes: smaller (for a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb) and larger (for a hand roughly 8 1/2" - 9" in circumference at the base of the thumb) - directions for larger size will follow those for the smaller size in parentheses

Yarn: Berroco Ultra Alpaca Fine (50% Superwash Wool, 20% Super Fine Alpaca, 30% Nylon; 433 yards [400 meters]/100 grams); #12177 Kaffir Mix - one skein

Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size 2, one set of dpns in size 1, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 30 stitches = 4 inches

Using your size 1 needles, cast on 56 (66) stitches loosely, and distribute between your three double pointed needles as follows: 20 stitches on your first needle, 16 stitches on your second needle, and 20 stitches on your third needle (for larger size: 20 stitches on you first needle, 26 stitches on your second needle, and 20 stitches on your third needle). Join in round. Then, we'll knit the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1 *

Knit this row 4 times, at which point we'll switch to our size 2 needles and our main pattern, which incorporates the Staghorn Cable from page 251 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. We'll need the following notation:

fc (front cross): slip 2 stitches to cn and hold in front, k2, then k2 from cn

bc (back cross): slip 2 stitches to cn and hold in back, k2, then k2 from cn

And then we'll proceed as follows (both sizes): 

Rows 1, 3 & 5: k8, p2, knit until there are 10 stitches left in round, p2, k8

Row 2: fc, k4, p2, knit until there are 10 stitches left in round, p2, k4, bc

Row 4: k2, fc, k2, p2, knit until there are 10 stitches left in round, p2, k2, bc, k2

Row 6: k4, fc, p2, knit until there are 10 stitches left in round, p2, bc, k4

Knit rows 1 - 6 six times. And now, it's time to begin gusseting in the thumb. So let's proceed as follows (both sizes):

Rows 1, 3 & 5: knit until there are 20 stitches left on first needle, m1r, k8, p2, knit across second needle, k10 from third needle, p2, k8, m1l, knit until end of round (and yes, this means that you won't be knitting at all before adding a stitch on your first repeat of this instruction)

Row 2: knit until there are 20 stitches left on first needle, fc, k4, p2, knit across second needle, k10 from third needle, p2, k4, bc, knit until end of round

Row 4: knit until there are 20 stitches left on first needle, k2, fc, k2, p2, knit across second needle, k10 from third needle, p2, k2, bc, knit until end of round

Row 6: knit until there are 20 stitches left on first needle, k4, fc, p2, knit across second needle, k10 from third needle, p2, bc, knit until end of round

Work rows 1 - 6 three times (for larger size, work rows 1 - 6 three times, and then work rows 1 - 2 once more). At this point, you should have 29 (30) stitches on your first and last needles. Knit across first 9 (10) stitches on your first needle and then transfer these 9 (10) stitches and the final 9 (10) stitches on your third needle to a scrap piece of yarn, to hold for working later as the thumb. And now, we'll resume our original pattern, joining the mitt back in the round at the thumb break. I've copied the pattern below again even though there are no changes. Naturally, that means it's still the same for both sizes, although you'll be beginning with row 3 of the pattern if you're making the larger size:

Rows 1, 3 & 5: k8, p2, knit until there are 10 stitches left in round, p2, k8

Row 2: fc, k4, p2, knit until there are 10 stitches left in round, p2, k4, bc

Row 4: k2, fc, k2, p2, knit until there are 10 stitches left in round, p2, k2, bc, k2

Row 6: k4, fc, p2, knit until there are 10 stitches left in round, p2, bc, k4

Knit rows 1 - 6 three times, and then knit row 1 once more (I think this should be perfectly sufficient for both sizes. Feel free to knit a few less or a few more rows, depending on your personal preference). Switch to your size 1 needles, and then work four rows in a * k1, p1 * ribbing. Bind off loosely in ribbing pattern. And then, using your size 2 dpns, pick up your thumb stitches again, taking care not to put a seam where the break in the stitches occurs (where you rejoined your glove in the round after removing the thumb stitches from your dpns). Knit around, picking up two extra stitches at the break, and completing 5 knit rows in total. Switch to your size 1 needles and knit two more rounds. Bind off loosely, and tuck in ends. Make another.


Photobombed by my two-year-old. But it gives nice size perspective...


15 comments:

  1. Lovely pattern...thank you.

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  2. These are beautiful! I'll have to have a go.

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    Replies
    1. I'm glad to hear you like them! And please, let me know if you have any questions!

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  3. Can I use circular needles instead of double pointed?

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    1. Hi Monica! The smallest circular needle I know of is 9", which is probably too large to work these gloves (and definitely too small to work the thumbs). There is a technique to use two circulars instead of dpns, however. Here's a link: http://www.weebleknits.net/twocirculars.html

      Hope that helps! :)

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    2. Another person suggested the magic loop.... here's a link to a video:

      http://www.knittinghelp.com/video/play/magic-loop

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  4. I think you will find it is the "throes" of winter or was that a play on words since it is a knitting column?

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    1. I do have a tendency to pun, but that wasn't one I made on purpose. Oops! :)

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  5. You could use the magic loop on one circular needle

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  6. Hello, first, thank you for a lovely free pattern! It looks wonderful and I'm ready to cast on!
    I have a silly question... is there no Left or Right mitten to this pattern, in other words, are they knitted exactly the same way, thumb and all? Since there was only instruction to 'make another'! (only had one other experience with mittens, sort of a newbie) Thank you!

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    1. Hello!

      First of all, there are no silly questions, only silly... I think I forgot how that saying goes :) And secondly, you are correct that they are exactly the same! That's one of the benefits of this pattern :)

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    2. Well, I'm silly too! ke ke ke
      And thank you for such a record time lightning fast response! Jimmy John's got nothing on you!
      I appreciate you! =)
      Maggie

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    3. Ha! Yes, knitting responses so fast you'll freak! :)

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