Showing posts with label hat. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hat. Show all posts

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Nikki's Slouch Hat

Nikki's Slouch Hat
Nikki's Slouch Hat
pictured in size Adult Small/Medium

Here's another pretty hat with a simple story: my friend Nikki was struggling to find a nice slouch hat here in Switzerland. Meanwhile, I had just bought some lovely yarns at my local store knowing that they would be *perfect* for something. And what do you know, a few conversations and copious swatching later, Nikki's Slouch Hat was born! With a combination of cabled panels (for squish) and simple striping (for ease), this hat has texture and charm galore!!!

Sizes: Adult Small/Medium (Adult Medium/Large)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Landlust Merino 120 (100% Virgin Wool; 131 yards [120 meters]/50 grams); #105 Taupe - one skein (two skeins) (color A), & #116 Petrol - one skein (both sizes) (color B) (side note: I didn't have a full 10% of my color A skein left over when I finished this hat, so I suppose it's possible that you'll need two skeins to finish the small size too. If you get in that situation, however, I suggest you fudge it and finish with color B, especially if you're gonna add a pompom!)

Nikki's Slouch Hat
A look at the back.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one 16" circular needle in size US 11, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 11, and one cable needle (cn) or extra dpn for cabling (or cable without a cable needle, if you like!)

Notions: tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size US 4 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 10.5 needle and your color A yarn, then, cast on 76 stitches (80 stitches) loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work in a basic ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures roughly 2" (2.5"-3"), and then transfer work to your size US 11 circular needle. Then, we'll work the following transition row. Notice the row is different for the two different sizes.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Xcellent Adventure Hat

Xcellent Adventure Hat
Xcellent Adventure Hat
pictured in small size


What can I say about this hat? Well, I guess I could start by mentioning that I still had a skein of this yarn left over after finishing the Rainbow Rib Mitts, and I thought that the variegation of it might work well for a larger project (since the color sections are on the long side, I thought I would at least get one full round in each color gradient for a hat). And since I also love the look of long slipped stitches with color work, I decided to combine the yarn and slipped stitch pattern for a fun, textured design.

Sizes: Teen/Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Lang Yarns Novena Color (50% Wool, 30% Alpaca, 20% Nylon; 240 yards [220 meters]/50 grams); #0009 Rosa/Violet/Blue - one to two skeins (two skeins) (side note again: I completed my size small hat with one skein)

Xcellent Adventure Hat
A better look at the finish.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6; one 16" circular needle in size US 8, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette 


So let's make a hat! Using your size US 6 circular needle, then, cast on 112 (128) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll do a simple ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row measures roughly 1.75" (2"). Transfer your work to your size US 8 needle and knit three rows around. Then we'll begin the pattern, as follows. Notice that your slipped stitches will seem short by the time you reach rows 11 & 23; simply tug them a bit when you work those rows to make them more pronounced. :)

Rows 1 - 4: * slip 1 stitch with yarn in back (sl1), k6, sl1, k8; rep from *

Row 5: * drop slipped stitch to front of work and slip next 3 stitches purlwise from left needle to right needle, pick up and place dropped stitch on left-hand needle, slip 3 stitches back to left-hand needle, and k4; then, slip next 3 stitches purlwise from left needle to right needle, drop next slipped stitch to front of work, slip the 3 stitches back to your left-hand needle and pick up and place dropped stitch on left hand needle, k12 *

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Zigzag Slouch Hat

Zigzag Slouch Hat
Zigzag Slouch Hat
Pictured in size small

This is another one of those designs that first appeared in my mind half-formed and hazy, and then solidified as soon as I bought the yarn. And while I know I'm reusing some concepts here (I used the same stitch pattern and combination of a solid yarn and a variegated yarn in the Zigazig Ah Scarf), I think that the finished result is pretty and novel, from the faux icords running up the seam to the notched back design.

Oh, and some notes on sizing and design here - first off, I know that there's a fairly significant size difference between the small size (which fits up to about a 23" head) and the large size (which fits bigger ones - up to 26.5" at least). This is for two reasons - one, the design suits either a close-fitting or a loose-fitting wear, so it's not too finicky, and if you're borderline on sizes you can choose based on whether or not you want your hat to fit tightly or slouch (you can also choose a size based on your volume of hair!). And two, the stitch pattern is 24 stitches long, and, though one could create a medium size by only working 12 of the final 24-stitch repeat, it would no longer be symmetrical in the back, which compromises some of the hat's appeal. All of that being said, if you'd like a truly medium sized hat, you could always work the design on needles that give you a slightly different gauge - for instance, work the large size with needles that give you 26 inches per 4" instead of the given 24.

Speaking of symmetry and sizing, I would also like to mention that I successfully worked my entire hat on size 4 needles. However, the icord cast on is a little tight, and required blocking to relax it. If you'd prefer, you could work your icord cast on in a needle one size larger than the needle with which you work the rest of your hat. Then you will avoid any too-tight brim issues entirely!

Sizes: Teen/Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Cool Wool Melange (100% Virgin Wool; 175 yards [160 meters]/50 grams); #115 - one skein (two skeins) (color A) and Lana Grossa Cool Wool Degrade (100% Virgin Wool; 175 yards [160 meters]/50 grams); #6002 - one skein (one skein) (color B)

Zigzag Slouch Hat
A better look at the back,
faux icords and all!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 4, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 4 (optional: dpns in size US 5 for icord cast on or a 24" circular in size US 4 if you're making the larger size of the hat)

Notions: Tapestry needle, 36" of scrap yarn, stitch marker

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your color A yarn, and your size US 4 or 5 dpns, cast on 4 stitches loosely. Then we'll work an icord cast on, as follows:

Icord Row (always worked as a right-side row): kfb, k3; then, when you go to begin your next row, use your tapestry needle to thread the first of kfb stitches onto your piece of scrap yarn purlwise to hold for later

Knit this icord row until you're holding 127 (151) stitches on your scrap yarn. Kfb in your first stitch one final time, transfer the first stitch (of your kfb) to your scrap yarn, and then bind off your four icord stitches (which include the second stitch from your kfb). Then, transfer the 128 (152) held stitches from your scrap yarn and onto your circular needle (you can use a 24" if you're making the large size). Once you have all your stitches transferred, continue to use your color A yarn and work as follows. Note that you can pull the yarn tight behind your slipped stitches; this creates the icord look.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Little Birds Hat

Little Birds Hat
Little Birds Hat

Yet again the story behind this hat is simple: while at the Edinburgh Yarn Festival in March, I went on a quest to find the perfect silvery yarn for a hat design. After combing through all of the booths, I finally settled on the subtle luster of this 4 ply from Ripples Crafts. Then, of course, once I had the fiber picked out I had to figure out the pattern, and ultimately decided to let a play on a basic stockinette let the yarn shine through. So if you, too, have a gorgeous 4 ply at home this may just be the design for you! (or - even better - order one of the gorgeous colorways from Ripples!!!!)

Yarn: Ripples Crafts Hand Dyed Yarn 4 Ply - Burras (100% Wool; 400 yards [366 meters]/100 grams); Moonshine - 1 skein (I used 58 grams, or roughly 232 yards)

Little Birds Hat
A look at the finish.
Needles: one 16" circular needle in size US 2, one 16" circular needle in size US 3, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 3

Notions: Tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 28 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 3 needles

Using your size US 2 needle, cast on 154 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures roughly 1.5". Transfer your work to your size US 3 circular needle. Then we'll begin our main pattern, which is Little Birds from page 105 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Rows 1 - 3: knit

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Pink Ponytail Hat

Pink Ponytail Hat
Pink Ponytail Hat

A few of you have been asking for a ponytail/messy bun hat, and I'll admit there are two reasons why I haven't jumped on the trend. #1 - Hedwig (my fake head) looks absolutely RIDICULOUS when I try to put her lovely hair in any kind of updo, which means that I have to model any version of this hat myself. Not exactly my favorite activity. And #2 - when one designs these kinds of hats, one doesn't get to design the very best part - the crown. Even in the face of this sad, crownless world, though, when I got a request to do a ponytail hat with a pattern similar to the Cellular Stitch Kids' Poncho, I put on my big girl pants and got it done. Because I couldn't make a crown, however, I had to get a bit fancier nearer to the face. But if you want to make this hat with the Cellular Stitch and that stitch alone (you can get a better view of it in the picture below - it's the top part, with the holes), simply knit the ribbing and then knit rows 26 - 29 on repeat until your hat measures roughly 6" and you've just finished row 29, and then proceed with the remaining rows as written.

Yarn: Sommer Merino 85 (100% Superwash Wool; 96 yards [85 meters]/50 grams); #867 - 2 skeins

Pink Ponytail Hat
A better view of the back.
And my small, sad little ponytail.
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 6, one 16" circular needle in size US 8, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make one of these hats, shall we? Using your size US 6 circular needle, cast on 90 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the following ribbing:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 2". Transfer work to your size US 8 circular needle, and then we'll work a variation on the Wide Leaf Border from page 342 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns that transitions into the Cellular Stitch. I wish I had better news for you at this point, but sadly you'll have to follow the pattern for every single row of this hat, as follows:

Rows 1 & 2: knit

Row 3:* k5, k2tog, (k1, yo, k1) in next stitch, ssk, k5 *

Row 4: * p5, k5, p5 *

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Arrowhead Hat

Arrowhead Hat
Arrowhead Hat
Pictured in Adult Large (that's why Hedwig's in
her big hair today)

The story behind this hat is simple: I have a friend who struggles to find a hat big enough for her hair, and I happen to know an independent knitwear accessory designer who loves to make people stuff they can't seem to find in stores (hint: it's me!). So, basically, the Arrowhead Hat is designed with plenty of slouch and two different sizes to accommodate as much or as little hair as you'd like to put inside of it.

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large) 

Yarn: Sommer Merino 125 (100% Superwash Wool; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #167 - 2 skeins (both sizes)

Arrowhead Hat
A better look
at the back.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, 1 stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 6 needles

And that makes it hat time! Using your size US 5 needle, then, cast on 112 (128) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 2.5" in length, and then transfer work to your size US 6 circular needle. Then we'll begin our main pattern, which is a combination of Arrowhead Lace and Little Arrowhead Lace from page 193 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Row 1: knit

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Super Baby Beanie

Super Baby Beanie
Super Baby Beanie
Pictured in size Adult Large

Before we dive into the specifics of the pattern, let's get one thing straight: yes, this hat is practically the same color as the last one I posted, the Four Winds Hat. As you'll remember, though, that's the yarn I snatched away from my husband before he could get too attached to it, and subsequently, the yarn that made me feel very, very guilty for the snatching. Hence the Super Baby Beanie for the Super Baby himself (hmm, that doesn't sound quite as flattering as I imagined it did). Anyway, this hat is made with an extra bulky fiber and big ol' needles, which makes it a perfect quick knit that still has plenty of pizazz. And while my girl Hedwig here looks pretty freakin' nice with it on (yes, I spent time braiding her wig), I should mention that it looks ever cuter on my husband!

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Alta Moda Super Baby (67% Wool, 30% Alpaca, 3% Polyamide; 65 yards [60 meters]/50 grams); #01 Oliv Meliert - 2 skeins

A closer look at the pattern
and the finish.

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 11, one 16" circular needle in size US 15, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 15

Notions: Tapestry needle, 1 stitch marker

Gauge: 10 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat! Using your size 11 needle, then, cast on 52 (56) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, we'll work the ribbing as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Work this ribbing row until hat measures just over 2". Transfer work to your size US 15 circular needle, and then we'll begin the main pattern, which is Ringlet Stitch from page 136 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. To do it, you'll need the following notation:

make ringlet (mr): purl 2 stitches, then keeping the yarn in front slip these 2 stitches back to your left-hand needle, pass yarn from front of work to back of work and slip the 2 stitches back to your right-hand needle, effectively wrapping the 2 purled stitches

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Four Winds Hat

Four Winds Hat

Okay, I should begin any description of this hat with an admission: that I bought the yarn for my husband, and originally intended to design this bad boy for him. Then, however, the yarn told me that it didn't want to belong to him, it wanted to belong to me instead. And then it said that this was the form that it dreamed of taking...

... sure, I'm exaggerating a bit. Truly, though, this design was 100% inspired by the fiber, and creates a very plush, delicious hat because of the twisted stitch pattern. Of course, since ALL of the stitches are twisted every other row it's a tad annoying to work, but I think the end result is definitely worth it!

Yarn: Malabrigo Worsted (100% Merino Wool; 210 yards [191 meters]/100 grams); #56 Olive - one skein 

A closer look at the stitch pattern and the
crown.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6, one 16" circular needle in size US 9, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 9

Notions: Tapestry needle, four stitch markers

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 8 needles (I'm giving you package gauge in case you're using a substitute yarn)

Okay, so let's make a hat! To start with, then, using your size US 6 needle, cast on 100 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, we'll knit the following marker placement row:

Marker Placement Row: (k1, [p1, k1] x 12, place marker) three times; then, k1, * p1, k1; rep from * until you reach the end of the row

Knit this marker placement row. Then we'll work our ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: (k1, * p1, k1; rep from * until you reach next marker, slip marker) four times

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures just over 2". Then, transfer work to your size US 9 circular needle, and continue to work as follows. Notice that you'll need the following terminology to continue:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Nightmare Yarn Hat

Nightmare Yarn Hat
Nightmare Yarn Hat
Pictured in Adult Large

Okay, first and foremost, let's get this straight: I'm not actually saying that this yarn (Lana Grossa Colorato Nodo) is a nightmare - I mean, heck, I picked it out, and was pretty darn excited when I saw it! However, as you can clearly see in every picture, this yarn has one peculiarity that makes it difficult to work with - the significant size changes of the fiber, which make roughly 1/10 of the stitches look like they gorged on cured ham until they become monstrously swollen. And because this is not a peculiarity that I noticed until I got the yarn home, my original plan for this yarn was a total disaster - this stuff doesn't take ribbing (who knew ribbing could look terrible!?!?), and looks even worse as a rolled brim (unless you want to look like an incompetent knitter). So, basically, I had to punt. Therefore, I went with the most fool-proof design I could think of, and one that you, too, can put to work for that almost-novelty yarn you accidentally bought and then realized swallows every pattern you put near it (or that you bought on purpose! hi there! no shame, we'll start a club!). (Of course, this pattern is perfectly good for non-nightmarish yarns too!)

Oh, and a quick word on sizing - usually, of course, when you're sizing your hat the biggest concern is head size. That doesn't work quite as well with the nightmare yarn conundrum. And in fact, if you're working with a fiber that isn't predominately wool, you may want to veer in the adult small direction just to accommodate the inevitable stretching.

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Colorato Nodo (90% Virgin Wool, 10% Polyamide; 120 yards [110 meters]/50 grams); #109 - two skeins 

Nightmare Yarn Hat
A better look at the finish,
the cable, and those pesky big
stitches.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles, also in size US 10, one cable needle (cn) or dpn for cabling, and one needle in size US 11 for provisional cast-on

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker, scrap yarn for provisional cast-on

Gauge: 15 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a cute hat from some difficult yarn! Using your size US 11 needle, cast on 18 stitches provisionally. Then, transfer the stitches to either one of your dpns or your size US 10 circular (you can use either since we're starting by knitting flat). Then we'll work the cabled bottom edge of the hat as you'll find below. To do this, you'll need the following notation. And remember you can always cable without a cable needle!

back cross (bc): transfer next 2 stitches to your cn and hold in back; k2, k2 from cn

front cross (fc): transfer next 2 stitches to your cn and hold in front; k2, k2 from cn

Friday, December 9, 2016

Bump Up From Basics Beanie

Bump Up From Basics Beanie
Pictured in Child Size

Okay, I'm doing something a little bit different with this pattern, since I'm not offering it on my website, but through a video tutorial I created on Skillshare instead. Which means that, yes, I've had to face my fear of being on camera (don't worry, I deleted all the takes where I opened my eyes super-wide for no reason), and that this pattern is not technically "free" since it requires a membership on the website to access it. If you sign up through the link above, however, you can get 3 months on the website for $0.99, and access to tons of video content from all sorts of talented and amazing people (and I get some compensation as well!).

Oh, and as far as the actual pattern is concerned - I designed the Bump Up From Basics Beanie as a sort of next-level project for beginning knitters who've gotten comfortable with knitting and purling and are ready to move on to something more complicated. Or in other words, I demonstrate every technique you need to make this hat in the video except for knitting, purling, and tucking in your ends! :)

Anyway, here are the details:

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Susan's Slouch Hat

Susan's Slouch Hat
(even though Hedwig is wearing it)

As you can probably guess from the name in the title, this hat was designed with a specific person in mind. And in fact, I've been meaning to knit this person something for some time, but it wasn't until autumn descended and I saw her seasonal red jacket that I realized EXACTLY what she needed (to be fair, she also told me she wanted something in the white/natural color family and tried to get knitting tips before I stole the project right out from under her and told her I'd come up with something instead). What was I saying? Oh right, Susan's Slouch Hat will be your go-to head covering since it knits up quickly in chunky weight yarn and has a simple but elegant design. (Oh, and let's keep our fingers crossed that it becomes Susan's go-to head covering as well, or the whole thing is a monumental failure!)

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Pure Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #063 Natural - one skein

A close-up of the detail that takes this hat from
blah to boo-yah (yeah, nobody says that)!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 8, one 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one 5 or 6 mm crochet hook, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 10.5, scrap yarn measuring roughly 24"

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 10.5 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 8 circular needle, then, cast on 72 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from * until end of round

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Friend of the Forest Hood

Friend of the Forest Hood
Size Medium

This particular design represents a perfect confluence of events; first, I got a request for a hooded cowl with a rounded crown, and then I found this rather spectacular alpaca yarn in the sale bin at my local yarn shop and knew that it would be perfect for the job. And if that isn't delightful enough, I also played a harrowing game of yarn chicken and managed to finish this medium size hood with just two skeins of the yarn. As you'll notice, however, I recommend a bit extra if you're making this size - unless, of course, you like to live as dangerously as I do. ;)

Sizes: Small (Medium; Large) (Small is perfect for toddlers & young children; medium for large children, teens, and small adults; large for large adults or simply a fuller-fitting hood)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Alta Moda Alpaca (90% Alpaca, 5% Virgin Wool, 5% Polyamide; 153 yards [140 meters]/50 grams); #035 Lime Sherbet - 2 skeins (3 skeins; 3 skeins)

A better look at the back finish.
Short rows give it a nice rounded seam.
Needles: one 16" circular needle in size US 9, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 9 for three needle bind off (you can also use regular straight needles and your circular needle for your third)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hood thingy thing! And let's start by casting on 96 (108; 120) stitches loosely, placing marker, and joining it in the round. Next, purl four rows around as edging. And once that's done, knit until knit section measures roughly 4" (4.5"; 5"). Then we'll work a few transition rows, as follows:

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Lollipop Beanie

Lollipop Beanie

The story behind this hat is mostly just a story about the yarn; I first spotted this perfect color in my local yarn store back in Madison, and, though I wanted to buy it about 1,000,000 times, I never did. Why? Well, because I have a tendency to psych myself out when trying to design with yarns I really love, and I never quite figured out exactly what I'd do with the skein. Then, of course, I moved to Switzerland, where I can no longer buy Malabrigo at my local yarn store, and I finally had to face the facts. I missed the brand, and wanted this exact skein. So I ordered the fiber online just a few weeks ago, and, this time, I knew exactly what I'd do with it as soon as I touched the stuff. Specifically, I decided to make a hat that looks good enough to eat, aka the Lollipop!

Yarn: Malabrigo Worsted (100% Merino Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #12 Very Berry – one skein

A better look at the cables.
They're lollipop-esque, no?
Needles: one 16" circular needle in size US 8, one 16" circular needle in size US 9, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size 9, and one cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 16 stitches = 4 inches on size US 9 needles in stockinette

So let's make a hat then! Using your size US 8 needles, cast on 80 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the ribbing as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from * 

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 2". Transfer work to your size US 9 circular needle, and then we'll knit one transition row, as follows:

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Twilight Rose Beanie

Twilight Rose Beanie
Twilight Rose Beanie

I have developed a weird fetish for the game of yarn chicken, and found the completion of this hat very exciting for exactly that reason; for a good hour or two, I was convinced I would have to run to the store for another skein of my fiber, and then for an hour or two after that I felt bold enough to continue without. At the end of the day, I finished this bad boy with about 2 yards of my first skein remaining, something I would brag about incessantly if anyone in my household actually cared (the boys are far more concerned about whether or not I'm going to feed them vegetables, and the husband makes an effort to nod politely, but I still know he doesn't know what I'm talking about, which ruins the fun). So what's my point? Oh yeah, this hat is lightweight, pretty, and a reasonably easy knit considering the look of the finished result, whether you require one skein or two.

Yarn: Lang Fantomas Superwash (75% Virgin Wool, 25% Polyamide; 153 yards [140 meters]/50 grams); #0209 Rosa Dunkel - 1-2 skeins

Twilight Rose Beanie
A better view of the finish.
I'm pleased with how it turned out.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 3; one 16" circular needle in size US 4; one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 4, cable needle (cn) or dpn for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 25 stitches = 4 inches on size US 4 needles 

So let's make a hat, shall we? Using your size US 3 needle, then, cast on 130 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. We'll need the following definitions to continue - and remember, you can always skip the cable needle if you're so inclined:

front cross (fc): slip next 3 stitches to cn and hold in front; k3, k3 from cn

back cross (bc): slip next 3 stitches to cn and hold in back; k3, k3 from cn

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Vine Lace Hat

Vine Lace Hat

Sometimes I feel creepy for the amount of time I spend combing Hedwig's new wig (that's my model). Other times, I figure I just feel like the Real Housewives of Atlanta's Kim Zolciak must feel, and think it's high time for me to launch my pop career and have more kids. Wait... where was I going with all this? Oh, right, I treated Hedwig to a new hat this week, and it's a lovely spring-weight design if I do say so myself. Made with an exceedingly simple but pretty lace pattern and a gathered, slouchy top, this hat would look good on just about anyone. Especially if that someone has a spray tan and a wig...

Sizes: adult small (adult medium/large)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash Sport (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #220 Spring Green - two skeins (both sizes)

A closer look at the lace.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpn), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, 3 stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 6 needles

Which brings us to the hat! To begin, then, using your size US 5 circular needle, cast on 112 (120) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *


Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Inside Outside Hat

Inside Outside Hat
pictured in Child Large (I made it with lots of
room to grow for the kid!)

This hat was spawned with a variety of inspirations in mind; first and foremost, of course, I had to consider the yarn that my eldest son fell head-over-heels in love with at the store. And while I'm not usually a huge fan of a purled fabric, I do love the way it looks with a variegated fiber, which gave me the first clue about how to approach this hat. But since I didn't want it to be too basic, I also gave it the small detail of the knit stitches in the decrease to add that extra pop. All in all, I hope you'll appreciate this hat's pinwheel finish and sleek look, and super-appreciate the fact that it's also knit inside out, so you don't actually have to work all those purls!

Sizes: Toddler (Child Small; Child Large; Adult Small; Adult Large)

Yarn: Debbie Bliss Rialto DK Print (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 114 yards [105 meters]/50 grams); #47014  - two skeins (two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two - three skeins)

The pinwheel finish.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat, then! As I mentioned above, this hat will be knit inside out, so that the bulk of the work will be knitting rather than purling. With that in mind, then, and using your size US 5 needle, cast on 96 (100; 104; 112; 120) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, purl roughly 1" (1"; 1.5"; 1.5"; 1.5") and transfer work to your size US 6 circular needle. And now, knit until piece measures roughly 5" (5.5"; 6"; 6.5"; 7") from purled band.

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

She's A Betty Bonnet

She's A Betty Bonnet
She's A Betty Bonnet
Isn't she, though?

When's the last time I mentioned how much I love Malabrigo yarn? Let's be honest: I probably bored my kids with that knowledge earlier this morning. However, just because I'm a broken record doesn't mean that you can't make this super-sweet bonnet for yourself or a loved one (and I'll even let you use a chunky weight fiber that isn't Malabrigo if you really insist). My only note is that, while I finished this bad boy with just one skein of the Mecha, or 130 yards, it was a close call so you may need slightly more yarn to complete yours. But don't worry - this fancifully-finished design (check out the back below!) will be worth it either way.

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #809 Solis - 1 - 2 skeins

She's A Betty Bonnet
A closer view of the back finish.
It's different, no?
Needles: Straight needles in size US 10.5, one 16" circular needle in size US 11 needle, and one set of double pointed needles in size US 11

Notions: Tapestry needle, 5 stitch markers

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 11 needles

So let's make a hat, then! First, then, since we'll begin by knitting flat, go ahead and use your size 10.5 needles to cast on 80 stitches loosely. Then we'll knit some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): * p1, k2, p1; rep from *

Ribbing Row 2: * k1, p2, k1 *

Knit ribbing rows 1 & 2 until piece measures roughly 1.5" and you've just finished row 2 of the pattern. Transfer work to your size US 11 needle (yes, it's circular, but we're still working flat!). Then we'll work one marker placement row, as follows:

Marker Placement Row (wrong side): p8, place marker, p24, place marker, p16, place marker, p24, place marker, p8

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Rainbow Maze Hat

 
Rainbow Maze Hat
Rainbow Maze Hat
Size Toddler

The story behind this hat is simple: I've been hat-shamed for not sending my youngest to his preschool with a proper head-covering, so I decided to make one for him (to be fair, he's a very stubborn child, and has only recently been willing to wear one). And not only did the Rainbow Maze Hat turn out quite well, but he's also even worn it once or twice. Small victories, you know!

Sizes: 12 Months (Toddler; Child Small; Child Large; Adult Small; Adult Large)

Yarn: Lang Yarns Merino 150 (100% Virgin Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #197.0035 - one skein (one skein; one - two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two skeins) (color A), & Lang Yarns Mille Colori Baby (100% Virgin Wool; 208 yards [190 meters]/50 grams); #845.0050 - one skein (all sizes) (color B)

Rainbow Maze Hat
The pattern, and the back
Plus the baby's new jacket
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 3, one 16" circular needle in size US 4, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 3 circular needle and your color A yarn, then, cast on 114 (120; 126; 132; 144; 156) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll move to our ribbing, which goes as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 3.5" (3.5"; 3.5"; 4"; 4"; 4"). Transfer work to your size US 4 circular needle, and then we'll knit two transition rows as follows:

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

I'm Lichen This Hat

I'm Lichen This Hat
No, really. I'm really, really, REALLY lichen it.

If recent years have taught me anything, it's that I am one of about six Americans who would rather eat rocks than watch a televised singing competition. Of course, I do have one odd exception to my music-free reality television preferences, the always-delightful The Sing-Off (I'm also lying when I say it's always delightful - 2014's weird Christmas special was no good. I miss Sara Bareilles). What's my point here? OH YEAH, PUNS! I think I like the show because of the constant and terrible puns that are constantly coming forth from host Nick Lachey's mouth. And, based on the name I came up with for this pattern, I also think the nice folks on TV's best a cappella singing competition program might tap me as a writer if the show ever gets another season.

Speaking of this hat, I got the design idea from a strange, ruched-looking entrance way I pass by every day on my way to my kids' schools, but you're just going to have to take my word for it because I've been too lazy to take a picture. I did get a lovely shot of some similarly-colored lichen, though, which made for a better pattern name anyway. You can find that below!

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #031 Mostaza - one skein

A better view of the back, cute little
braid and all!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10, one 16" circular needle in size US 11 needle, one set of double pointed needles in size US 11, and a cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, 4 stitch markers

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 11 needles

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 10 circular needle, then, cast on 66 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a few edging rows, for which you'll need the following terminology. Remember you can always skip your cable needle, if you'd like.

back cross (bc): slip 2 stitches to cn and hold in back; k2, k2 from cn

front cross (fc): slip 2 stitches to cn and hold in front; k2, k2 from cn

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Oops I Did It Again Beanie

Oops I Did It Again Beanie

So here's the thing. I had the inspiration for the texture of this hat very organically - proof lies in the picture below - when I was walking near my sons' new school. I was even more excited when I realized that I had actually brought a perfect yarn for the job with me from Wisconsin. So I cast on, got working, and then about halfway through realized that it's basically the same pattern I used in the Belt Welt Hat, except in miniature. Oops. On the plus side, the Oops I Did It Again Beanie is a great study in how yarn weight affects texture, and is also a nice unisex design. So... that's something, right?

Yarn: Three Irish Girls Yarn Inc. Springvale DK (100% Superwash Merino; 270 yards [245 meters]/4 ounces); Tête de fromage - one skein

The pattern. As you can see from the rolled-back brim,
it's pretty on the wrong side as well!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 4; one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat! Using your circular needles, then, cast on 128 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Oh, and here's an inspirational picture for you in case you're already tired. See how pretty the texture is?