Friday, May 9, 2014

Cellular Stitch Kids' Poncho

Cellular Stitch Kids' Poncho

As I'm sure I've mentioned, I have a hard time letting a house guest leave without a knit good or two. And since a friend stayed for weeks to help with our family's latest addition (who I'm sure I'll knit something for soon as well), I designed this poncho for her daughter in return. Since I was working with a variegated yarn, I tried to keep the pattern simple but appealing, and worked a basic openwork for the majority of the design with a couple of lace stripes for the shoulders. As I found out as soon as my friend's daughter put it on, however, it looks just as good with the stripes going up the front and the back of the poncho as it does with them on the shoulders!

The cellular stitch, closer up.
Sizes: Toddler (2 - 3 years); Child (4 - 7 years) (the instructions for the larger size will follow the instructions for the smaller size in parentheses)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Jelli Beenz (75% Acrylic, 25% Wool; 214 yards [196 meters]/100 grams); #2385 Flamingo - two skeins (if you have the 50 gram skeins instead, 3 will do you)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size 8, one 24" circular needle in size 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, four stitch markers

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches

So let's begin! Using your 16" circular needle, cast on 72 stitches loosely (80 for the larger size), place marker, and join in round. Knit 1" in a k1, p1 ribbing, and then we'll knit the following addition row:

Addition Row: * k2, m1, k1 * (larger size: * k3, m1, k2; rep from *) (96 stitches, both sizes)

And once that's done, we'll knit the following transition row, in order to place our extra stitch markers. It is the same for both sizes.

Transition Row: k39, place marker, k9, place marker, k39, place marker, knit until end of round 

After that, we'll complete the rest of our increases, during which time we'll also begin the shoulder pattern, which is Razor Shell, from page 206 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. So let's proceed as follows:

Row 1: knit until first marker, slip marker, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, knit until third marker, slip marker, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

Row 2: yo, knit until first marker, yo, slip marker, k9, slip marker, yo, knit until third marker, yo, slip marker, k9

Knit rows 1 & 2 six times (nine times for larger size). You'll be able to switch to your longer needle after about three repeats. And once you're done with those increases, it's time to begin our eyelet pattern, which is Cellular Stitch from page 246 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns (plus some more, less frequent increases). So let's proceed as follows:

Row 1: k2, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're one stitch before first marker, k1, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k2, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're one stitch before third marker, k1, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

Row 2: yo, knit until first marker, yo, slip marker, k9, slip marker, yo, knit until third marker, yo, slip marker, k9

Row 3: k3, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're two stitches before first marker, k2, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k3, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're two stitches before third marker, k2, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

Row 4: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

Row 5: k3, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're two stitches before first marker, k2, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k3, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're two stitches before third marker, k2, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

Row 6: yo, knit until first marker, yo, slip marker, k9, slip marker, yo, knit until third marker, yo, slip marker, k9

Row 7: k4, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're three stitches before first marker, k3, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k4, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're three stitches before third marker, k3, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

Row 8: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

Row 9: k4, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're three stitches before first marker, k3, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k4, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're three stitches before third marker, k3, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

Row 10: yo, knit until first marker, yo, slip marker, k9, slip marker, yo, knit until third marker, yo, slip marker, k9

Row 11: k5, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're four stitches before first marker, k4, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k5, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're four stitches before third marker, k4, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

Row 12: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

Knit rows 1 - 12 three times (four times for the larger size). Then, purl four rows around and bind off loosely. Tuck in ends and, if desired, stitch purled edge in place where it naturally curls, for the border.




15 comments:

  1. Do you have instructions for a size 10-12 poncho?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Barbara!

      I don't currently have instructions for that size, but I've found some sizing stuff and think I could adapt it. Give me a day or two and I'll post additional instructions! :)

      Delete
    2. Hi again!

      I did my best to convert this pattern. Of course, I haven't knit this size and I'm working from industry standard measurements, which aren't exactly the same as the ones I would take if I had a 12 year old girl standing in front of me. I think it should work out well since the math is right, but my standard disclaimer in these circumstances still applies - since I haven't made it, I can't make guarantees, and if anything seems wonky, let me know and we'll try to fix it! Anyway, the pattern is below. :)

      Sizes: Girls 10-12

      Using your 16" circular needle, cast on 88 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Knit 1" in a k1, p1 ribbing, and then we'll knit the following
      transition row, in order to place our extra stitch markers.

      Transition Row: k35, place marker, k9, place marker, k35, place marker, k9

      After that, we'll complete the rest of our increases, during which time we'll also begin the shoulder pattern. So let's proceed as follows:

      Row 1: knit until first marker, slip marker, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, knit until third marker, slip marker, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

      Row 2: yo, knit until first marker, yo, slip marker, k9, slip marker, yo, knit until third marker, yo, slip marker, k9 (+4 stitches)

      Knit rows 1 & 2 fourteen times. You should now have 144 stitches total. Switch to your longer needle when you can, after about three repeats. And once you're done with those increases, we’ll proceed as follows:

      Row 1: k2, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're one stitch before first marker, k1, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k2, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're one stitch before third marker, k1, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

      Row 2: yo, knit until first marker, yo, slip marker, k9, slip marker, yo, knit until third marker, yo, slip marker, k9

      Row 3: k3, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're two stitches before first marker, k2, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k3, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're two stitches before third marker, k2, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

      Row 4: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Row 5: k3, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're two stitches before first marker, k2, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k3, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're two stitches before third marker, k2, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

      Row 6: yo, knit until first marker, yo, slip marker, k9, slip marker, yo, knit until third marker, yo, slip marker, k9

      Row 7: k4, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're three stitches before first marker, k3, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k4, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're three stitches before third marker, k3, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

      Row 8: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Row 9: k4, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're three stitches before first marker, k3, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k4, * k2tog, yo, k1 * until you're three stitches before third marker, k3, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

      Row 10: yo, knit until first marker, yo, slip marker, k9, slip marker, yo, knit until third marker, yo, slip marker, k9

      Row 11: k5, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're four stitches before first marker, k4, and slip marker; then, k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1, slip next marker, k5, * yo, k1, k2tog * until you're four stitches before third marker, k4, and slip marker; end k1, yo, k2, sl1-k2tog-psso, k2, yo, k1

      Row 12: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Knit rows 1 - 12 six times. Then, purl four rows around and bind off loosely. Tuck in ends and, if desired, stitch purled edge in place where it naturally curls, for the border.

      Delete
  2. I'm having trouble with Row 1 after the transition row. There are not enough stitches left after the third marker to follow the pattern. I've restarted this project 3 times and always end up short stitches. Can anyone give some insight as to what I am doing wrong.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there!

      After the transition row, you should have 96 stitches on your needle for either size. I've rechecked the math on this, and it seems like everything adds up, so my best guess is that you're simply missing some of the added stitches (sorry!). This is an annoying suggestion, but you could place stitch markers every three stitches (smaller size) or 5 stitches (larger size) when you knit the addition row, as a trigger to remember those addition stitches. You could also simply count your stitches at the end of the row and make sure you've got 96; if not, you could just rip back a handful and add as many as you need, not in pattern (it shouldn't make too big of a difference, unless you're really short). I hope that helps! :)

      Delete
  3. you have converted this poncho to size girls 10-12, is it asking too much of you to convert to
    adult size large? I really like this pattern, but need adult size. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi! The measurements I need in order to convert it are neck, shoulders, and distance from neck to shoulder measured more or less along the collarbone. If you can get me those dimensions I can help you with a conversion! :)

      Delete
  4. good afternoon

    this is a beautiful pattern and was wondering if there is a crochet conversion? thank you so much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi!

      I'm glad you like the pattern. Unfortunately, my crochet skills are definitely not good enough to come up with a conversion (I haven't picked up my hooks in years!). Sorry I can't be more help! :)

      Delete
  5. Hi Gretchen!

    First, thank you for sharing your patterns freely with everyone. I have made two of your hats so far and love them. I have been searching the web the last few days for a pattern to make a "messy bun hat" and nothing has jumped out at me until I saw your poncho. I'm very new to knitting so I was wondering what part of the pattern is the "bobble type stitch'? Also, have you by any chance done a hat out of that stitch pattern? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Happy Knitting :-)
    Sky

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    Replies
    1. Hi Sky!

      This pattern doesn't have any bobbles in it - I think the only thing I've designed with bobbles is the Cherry Blossom Cowl. And unfortunately I also haven't designed any messy bun hats yet - this is the (only) time of year that I make many gifts, and everyone this year has just wanted plain hats, so that's what I've been up to recently! :)

      Anyway, I'm a bit confused about your question - are you interested in a hat with bobbles, or a hat with a stitch pattern similar to this poncho? Either way it's probably not something I've designed yet, but I am definitely planning to design a messy bun hat in the near future and would be happy to work in your suggestions. :)

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  6. Hi Gretchen,

    Thanks for the reply. I guess I'm calling the bottom part of the Cellular Stitch Poncho "bobble like" So what I'm wondering is what the repeat pattern is on that part (bottom half of the poncho). I purchased some of Lion Brand's Scarfie yarn and think a messy bun hat would look great in that yarn and your pattern.

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    Replies
    1. Ah hah, gotcha! :) Like I said I've got a few other projects going on right now but I'll definitely add this one to the list! :)

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    2. Thanks. I'll keep checking back. :-)

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    3. I know it's been awhile but it's done! http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/2017/03/pink-ponytail-hat.html As you'll notice, I give instructions if you want to complete the hat using only the Cellular Stitch pattern. :)

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