Showing posts with label sport. Show all posts
Showing posts with label sport. Show all posts

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Morning Glory Shawl

Morning Glory Shawl

You know when you buy yarn for a hat, but then you get confused and suddenly you're making a shawl instead? Well, that's pretty much the story behind this little number, which is made with roughly 430 yards of the light purple yarn and half as much of both the white and the darker shade (however, I should note that, while it is totally possible to use two skeins of the Alpaca Peru for the middle section and one skein apiece for each of the differently-colored sections, I didn't have quite enough left to be 100% sure that everyone can get it done with this four ball approach - if you're a loose knitter, for instance, you may need slightly more yarn, or to quit the short row sections a little early). Either way, though, if you're in the market for a hat-turned-shawl as well, I can highly recommend this pattern!

Finished Dimensions: roughly 16" up the cable in the center; roughly 38" along the top of each "wing" (so about 76" from side to side)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Alpaca Peru 200 (100% Alpaca; 219 yards [200 meters]/50 grams); #201 Tulipwood - two skeins (color A), John Arbon Alpaca Delight (70% Superfine Alpaca, 30% Falklands Merino; 465 yards [425 meters]/100 grams); Natural White - one skein (color B), & Lana Grossa Alpaca Peru 200 #202 Red Purple - one skein (color C)

A better view of the back.
Needles: One 32" or longer circular needle in size US 4, cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling (of course you can also cable without one!)

Notions: tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches on size US 4 needles

Alrighty, then, let's make a shawl! Begin by casting on 3 stitches loosely with your color A yarn, and then working 8 rows in garter stitch to create a tab. Then, without turning work, yarn over (yo) twice, pick up 1 stitch about 1/3rd of the way down along the edge of the tab, (yo) twice again, pick up 1 stitch roughly 2/3rds of the way down the edge of the tab, and (yo) twice again. Complete tab by picking up 3 stitches along cast-on edge; you should now have stitches coming from 3 sides of the tab - 3 along original working edge - 8 along the side (counting each double yo as 2 stitches), and 3 along the cast-on edge. Then, work a few set-up rows as follows, still in our color A yarn. To continue, you'll need the following notation:


front cross (fc): slip next 4 stitches to cn and hold in front; k4, k4 from cn

Set-up Row 1 (wrong side): k3, ((k1, p1) in yo, p1) twice, (k1, p1) in yo, k3


Thursday, September 7, 2017

Follow Your Arrow Shawl

Follow Your Arrow Shawl
Follow Your Arrow Shawl

First and foremost: a quick thanks to Nikki from Zender Studios for taking these photos for me; you're a doll for helping (and lending me your shoes for the pictures)! And with that being said, let's get to some details about the pattern...

... like the fact that I should probably apologize for the fact that I made this delightful shawl using mill ends that I bought at the Edinburgh Yarn Festival, which means that I can't tell you *exactly* what's in the thing. However, I CAN tell you that I carefully measured everything I used, and added a 10% allowance to the values below, so you can find grams/yards/meters for every color, which should help you to choose your own materials (just remember: having the appropriate yardage is more important than the weight, especially for colors D & E [since those are my heavier weight yarns]). I also encourage you to view the pattern as a jumping-off point for your own color ideas; overall, it's made of 10 sections with 2 colors apiece, so the possibilities abound!

Speaking of the fact that it's 10 sections (and kite shaped, when laid out!), I should also mention that this pattern has not been tech edited, and since it's one of my lengthier designs I welcome any questions or comments about errors that you may find. Ultimately, it's not terribly complicated since I used the same pattern all over (a combination of garter and a mesh pattern), but once you add color choices and increases and decreases to the thing, I'm certain I slipped in my notation at least a few times. So again, I'm very happy to help with any issues you may find; in fact, I've even labeled each section of the design so that it's easier for you to identify any problems to me (just give me section and row number and we'll be good to go!).

Oh, and I know I'm being verbose today, but one last thing; I noticed, as I worked this, that it's easier to make knitting errors in the sections in which you're beginning with your color A, or the mesh pattern. If you notice that your counts are off, don't despair! This mesh pattern is VERY forgiving of errors, and as long as you correct your stitch counts by the end of each section you will be able to proceed, even if you've made a mistake (and, again, I highly doubt you'll find your error ever again). All in all - bon courage, and I hope you like your finished shawl as much as I like mine (IT'S AMAZING!). Also, if one of you actually makes it in the target yarn (ideally John Arbon Textiles Knit by Numbers 4 Ply) please send me pictures, so I know what it would look like if I didn't have such a strong attraction to the mill ends bin. Of course, even if you make it with a bunch of odds and ends like I did, I think it will turn out great just the same!!! :) (other ideas: scale it up with DK weight yarn and the appropriate sized needles if you'd like, or even worsted it you want a real sleeping bag of a shoulder wrap. and again, send pics!)

Finished Size: 75" long in total, 28" inches wide at the widest point

Yarn: John Arbon Textiles mill ends; White (Alpaca Delight, 70% Alpaca, 30% Merino; Color A; 120 grams, or roughly 510 meters/558 yards), Green (Knit by Numbers 4 ply, 100% Merino; Color B; 8 grams, or roughly 32 meters/35 yards), Orange/Green (unknown fiber; Color C; 30 grams or roughly 120 meters/132 yards), Dark Orange/Red (100% Merino; Color D; 58 grams or roughly 145 meters/159 yards), Light Orange (Knit by Numbers DK, 100% Merino; Color E; 100 grams or roughly 250 meters/274 yards)

Follow Your Arrow Shawl
From the side
Needles: One pair of needles in size US 3 (3.25 mm) (I used a 32" circular needle, but I think you should be able to make this on straights if need be, although they will get quite crowded!)

Notions: tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: I am a terrible person and used two different weight yarns in this shawl, as mentioned. Colors A, B, and C are 28 stitches = 4 inches on US 2 needles, the rest are 24 stitches = 4 inches on size US 4 needles. I am loosely averaging this to mean 26 stitches = 4 inches on US 3 needles for all. Like I said, terrible!

So let's get started! Using your color B yarn, cast on 2 stitches. Then, right next to those 2 stitches, use your color A yarn to cast on 3 stitches as well (at this point, that means that these two sets of stitches are not connected). Then, using intarsia color joins for all color changes, we'll begin our first color section like so:

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Zigzag Slouch Hat

Zigzag Slouch Hat
Zigzag Slouch Hat
Pictured in size small

This is another one of those designs that first appeared in my mind half-formed and hazy, and then solidified as soon as I bought the yarn. And while I know I'm reusing some concepts here (I used the same stitch pattern and combination of a solid yarn and a variegated yarn in the Zigazig Ah Scarf), I think that the finished result is pretty and novel, from the faux icords running up the seam to the notched back design.

Oh, and some notes on sizing and design here - first off, I know that there's a fairly significant size difference between the small size (which fits up to about a 23" head) and the large size (which fits bigger ones - up to 26.5" at least). This is for two reasons - one, the design suits either a close-fitting or a loose-fitting wear, so it's not too finicky, and if you're borderline on sizes you can choose based on whether or not you want your hat to fit tightly or slouch (you can also choose a size based on your volume of hair!). And two, the stitch pattern is 24 stitches long, and, though one could create a medium size by only working 12 of the final 24-stitch repeat, it would no longer be symmetrical in the back, which compromises some of the hat's appeal. All of that being said, if you'd like a truly medium sized hat, you could always work the design on needles that give you a slightly different gauge - for instance, work the large size with needles that give you 26 inches per 4" instead of the given 24.

Speaking of symmetry and sizing, I would also like to mention that I successfully worked my entire hat on size 4 needles. However, the icord cast on is a little tight, and required blocking to relax it. If you'd prefer, you could work your icord cast on in a needle one size larger than the needle with which you work the rest of your hat. Then you will avoid any too-tight brim issues entirely!

Sizes: Teen/Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Cool Wool Melange (100% Virgin Wool; 175 yards [160 meters]/50 grams); #115 - one skein (two skeins) (color A) and Lana Grossa Cool Wool Degrade (100% Virgin Wool; 175 yards [160 meters]/50 grams); #6002 - one skein (one skein) (color B)

Zigzag Slouch Hat
A better look at the back,
faux icords and all!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 4, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 4 (optional: dpns in size US 5 for icord cast on or a 24" circular in size US 4 if you're making the larger size of the hat)

Notions: Tapestry needle, 36" of scrap yarn, stitch marker

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your color A yarn, and your size US 4 or 5 dpns, cast on 4 stitches loosely. Then we'll work an icord cast on, as follows:

Icord Row (always worked as a right-side row): kfb, k3; then, when you go to begin your next row, use your tapestry needle to thread the first of kfb stitches onto your piece of scrap yarn purlwise to hold for later

Knit this icord row until you're holding 127 (151) stitches on your scrap yarn. Kfb in your first stitch one final time, transfer the first stitch (of your kfb) to your scrap yarn, and then bind off your four icord stitches (which include the second stitch from your kfb). Then, transfer the 128 (152) held stitches from your scrap yarn and onto your circular needle (you can use a 24" if you're making the large size). Once you have all your stitches transferred, continue to use your color A yarn and work as follows. Note that you can pull the yarn tight behind your slipped stitches; this creates the icord look.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Divine Drape Cowl

Divine Drape Cowl
Divine Drape Cowl

If this cowl is one thing, it's a summer-to-autumn wardrobe staple that would look great in any color, at virtually any length. And if it's two things, it's also yet another one of my attempts at the absolute perfect cowl design: not too bulky around the back of the neck, but with enough fun in the front to attract some attention. And heck, while we're at it - why not make it THREE things -- or in other words, your next project? ;)

Yarn: Premier Yarns Cotton Fair (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 317 yards [290 meters]/100 grams); #27-09 Lavender - one skein

Divine Drape Cowl
The main stitch pattern. Airy
and pretty, no?
Needles: Straight needles in size US 3, straight needles in size US 4, straight needles in size US 8, and straight needles in size US 5 for provisional cast-on

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 23 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

So let's make a cowl! Using your size 5 needles and a length of scrap yarn, then, cast on 35 stitches provisionally. Transfer work to your size 4 needles and knit two transition rows, as follows:

Transition Row 1 (wrong side): purl

Transition Row 2: knit

Knit these two transition rows, and then transfer work to your size 3 needles and we'll work a ribbing for a bit, like so:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): p1, * k1, p1; rep from * until you reach the end of the row

Ribbing Row 2: k1, * p1, k1 *

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag

Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
pictured in size medium

I came up with the idea for this bag for a very simple reason: you can find this style EVERYWHERE in Switzerland. Seriously, what I remember (perhaps incorrectly) as a passing fad in the United States took deep roots in Swiss soil, much like the "Parental Advisory" branded clothing and hats that, while virtually extinct stateside, still roam the Swiss countryside like long-hunted wolves. Wait! What am I talking about? Oh yeah - the bag! They're everywhere here, and they're all the same size: adult. Which gave me the oh-so-clever idea to create a variety of kid sizes, since kids, without question, freakin' love bags. Oh, and if you love the look of this too, you're in luck, since the extra-large size is basically just adult. :)

Sizes: Small (Medium; Large; Extra-Large) (approximate finished dimensions: 6" wide by 7.5" tall [8" x 9.5"; 10" x 11.5", 12" x 13.5"])

Yarn: Patons Grace (100% Mercerized Cotton; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #62628 Fiesta - 2 skeins (2 skeins; 3 skeins; 3 - 4 skeins)

A closer view of the grommet
hole thingamabob. I know, I'm a poet.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 4, one 16" circular needle in size US 5, double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5 for making i-cords, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, 3 stitch markers

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's get this started! To begin this bag, then, we'll start by knitting the two drawstring-holding portions at the top separately and back-and-forth before joining them in the round (so the purled strips at the top that your straps lace through). With that in mind, and using your size US 4 needles, cast on 36 (48; 60; 72) stitches loosely. Then work the following rows:

Row 1 (right side): slip 1 stitch, purl until end of row

Row 2: slip 1 stitch, knit until end of row

Knit rows 1 & 2 five times and then knit row 1 once more (all sizes). Then, clip yarn tail and transfer work to your size US 5 circular needle to resume later. Again, using your size US 4 needles, cast on 36 (48; 60; 72) stitches loosely and work rows 1 & 2 five times and row 1 once more, although this time, when you finish, don't clip the tail. Transfer the work you've just finished to your size 5 needle, next to your other piece, making sure that the right sides (purl sides) are both oriented correctly, and that the piece you've just finished, with the running yarn connected, is lined up on the right-hand needle of your circulars so that you can continue work in the round. At that point, join in round, place row marker, and then knit one row around. Then we'll knit one transition/marker placement row, as follows. Since it's different for the different sizes, I have listed each size's row separately for ease.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Carved Diamond Cowl

Carved Diamond Cowl
Carved Diamond Cowl

I would like to tell you something about this cowl, but the Pentatonix video blaring at 1,000 decibels to my right is distracting me slightly (what can I say, my children are obsessed!). So I'll just say, first of all, thank you to the dear friend who mailed me this yarn all the way from Alaska. And then I'll get right to the pattern part, so you can make one of your own!

Yarn: Premier Yarns Cotton Fair (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 317 yards [290 meters]/100 grams); #27-04 Turquoise - one skein

Carved Diamond Cowl
Another view of the pattern.
Quite pretty, no?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 4 (optional but recommended: one 16" circular needle in size US 3 for edging)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 23 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 4 needle, cast on 128 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round (if you're doing your edging in size 3, use that needle instead). Purl five rows around. Switch to your size 4 needle, if you didn't cast on with it, and then we'll continue in Carved Diamond Pattern from page 150 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. You will need the following notation to continue:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Something Special Gift Bags

Something Special Gift Bags
Something Special Gift Bags

Now that I live in Switzerland, much of my life revolves around chocolate. More specifically, where to buy it, how to distribute it, and whether or not I should ship it back to friends and loved ones or just lock myself in the bathroom and gobble it up while the children bang on the door (note: I have never actually done this. I have a much cleverer hidden chocolate-eating system that involves a cupboard door and pretending to look for the ingredients I need for dinner). What was I talking about? Oh yeah, gift bags! A friend of mine recently divulged her cost-saving practice of buying chocolate at the factory store and then rebagging it for Christmas gifts, and a light turned on in my head. What better summer knitting project than these little gift bag delights, after all, which are not just scrap-busters, but also earth-friendly and quick-knitting?

Sizes: Small (Medium; Large) (Finished dimensions roughly as follows, with a note that the closed hole pattern will be slightly narrower than the open hole pattern in all sizes. That being said, the small is roughly 3.5" wide x 4.75" tall, the medium 4.75" x 6.25", and the large 6" x 7.75")

Yarn: Maddison Bio Baby (100% Organic Cotton; 197 yards [180 meters]/50 grams); #06 Purple - one skein; #03 Tan - one skein, & #01 White - one skein

Something Special Gift Bags
A better look at the openwork pattern;
you can find a close-up of the
closed version below.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 26 stitches = 4 inches 

Which brings us to the pattern! Please note that I used the yarn I had leftover from the Crystal and Pearl Cowl for these gift bags, and, while I've identified the colors above, I haven't prescribed colors in the pattern since you can pick whichever color you dang want for each piece. Having said that, cast on 48 (64; 80) stitches in whichever color you'd like to use for the body of the bag and then divide between 3 or 4 dpns (whichever you prefer) as evenly as possible while still maintaining groups of 8 stitches. Join in round. Then we'll work the following edging rows, which are the same for all sizes:

Edging Rows 1 - 4: * k2, p2; rep from *

Edging Row 5: knit

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Twilight Rose Beanie

Twilight Rose Beanie
Twilight Rose Beanie

I have developed a weird fetish for the game of yarn chicken, and found the completion of this hat very exciting for exactly that reason; for a good hour or two, I was convinced I would have to run to the store for another skein of my fiber, and then for an hour or two after that I felt bold enough to continue without. At the end of the day, I finished this bad boy with about 2 yards of my first skein remaining, something I would brag about incessantly if anyone in my household actually cared (the boys are far more concerned about whether or not I'm going to feed them vegetables, and the husband makes an effort to nod politely, but I still know he doesn't know what I'm talking about, which ruins the fun). So what's my point? Oh yeah, this hat is lightweight, pretty, and a reasonably easy knit considering the look of the finished result, whether you require one skein or two.

Yarn: Lang Fantomas Superwash (75% Virgin Wool, 25% Polyamide; 153 yards [140 meters]/50 grams); #0209 Rosa Dunkel - 1-2 skeins

Twilight Rose Beanie
A better view of the finish.
I'm pleased with how it turned out.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 3; one 16" circular needle in size US 4; one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 4, cable needle (cn) or dpn for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 25 stitches = 4 inches on size US 4 needles 

So let's make a hat, shall we? Using your size US 3 needle, then, cast on 130 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. We'll need the following definitions to continue - and remember, you can always skip the cable needle if you're so inclined:

front cross (fc): slip next 3 stitches to cn and hold in front; k3, k3 from cn

back cross (bc): slip next 3 stitches to cn and hold in back; k3, k3 from cn

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Vine Lace Hat

Vine Lace Hat

Sometimes I feel creepy for the amount of time I spend combing Hedwig's new wig (that's my model). Other times, I figure I just feel like the Real Housewives of Atlanta's Kim Zolciak must feel, and think it's high time for me to launch my pop career and have more kids. Wait... where was I going with all this? Oh, right, I treated Hedwig to a new hat this week, and it's a lovely spring-weight design if I do say so myself. Made with an exceedingly simple but pretty lace pattern and a gathered, slouchy top, this hat would look good on just about anyone. Especially if that someone has a spray tan and a wig...

Sizes: adult small (adult medium/large)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash Sport (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #220 Spring Green - two skeins (both sizes)

A closer look at the lace.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpn), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, 3 stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 6 needles

Which brings us to the hat! To begin, then, using your size US 5 circular needle, cast on 112 (120) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *


Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Mossy Path Mitts

Mossy Path Mitts

I've been noticing a lot of things as I walk around recently; pretty windows, even prettier balconies, and a plethora of semi-indecent carvings and statues. I've also noticed a lot of moss. It creeps between bricks, climbs up walls, and spreads over stones. It was also the inspiration for the slipped stitch color pattern of these lovely, snuggly mitts. :)

Oh, and a big note on the sizing of these bad boys, too: I debated casting on an extra 5 stitches for each size (i.e. instructing to cast on 45 stitches for the smalls instead of 40), but ultimately decided that the sizing is correct as given because, at the very upper end of the size small, I love the snug hug of these mitts. However, if you have any trouble keeping your yarn loose behind your slipped stitches or if you don't want a super snug-fitting mitt, I highly recommend that you knit one size larger than you might otherwise. Same goes if you're making these as a gift - don't make the small unless you've got specific hand dimensions or you're making them for a child, a bird, or a frenemy you want to feel guilty about the time you put into knitting mitts that she simply can't squeeze on.

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium up to 9", and the large goes up to about 9.75")

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash Sport (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #859 Lake Chelan Heather - one skein (color A) & #220 Spring Green - one skein (color B)

A closer look at the mitts.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 6 needles (roughly 26 inches = 4 inches unstretched in pattern)

So let's make some mitts! Using your size US 5 needles and your color A yarn, then, cast on 40 (45; 50) stitches loosely, dividing stitches between three dpns as follows: 15 stitches on your first needle; 10 on your second; and 15 on your third ([15; 15; 15]; [15; 20; 15]). Join in round. Then we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * (k1, p1) twice, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 6 (6; 7) times. Then, transfer work to your size 6 needles. Once that's done, we'll move to our main pattern, as follows:

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Oops I Did It Again Beanie

Oops I Did It Again Beanie

So here's the thing. I had the inspiration for the texture of this hat very organically - proof lies in the picture below - when I was walking near my sons' new school. I was even more excited when I realized that I had actually brought a perfect yarn for the job with me from Wisconsin. So I cast on, got working, and then about halfway through realized that it's basically the same pattern I used in the Belt Welt Hat, except in miniature. Oops. On the plus side, the Oops I Did It Again Beanie is a great study in how yarn weight affects texture, and is also a nice unisex design. So... that's something, right?

Yarn: Three Irish Girls Yarn Inc. Springvale DK (100% Superwash Merino; 270 yards [245 meters]/4 ounces); Tête de fromage - one skein

The pattern. As you can see from the rolled-back brim,
it's pretty on the wrong side as well!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 4; one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat! Using your circular needles, then, cast on 128 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Oh, and here's an inspirational picture for you in case you're already tired. See how pretty the texture is?

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

XOXO Beanie

XOXO Beanie

First, the good news: the new head is here! She's a bit sullen and weird looking, but she'll do. I think I'll call her Hedwig (GET IT!!?!?!?!?!). Next, the even better news: I'm thinking about buying her a wig or two, just for funsies. I lined this hat with one of my husband's biking beanies to highlight the lace portion for the photos (my first attempt at lining it with a pair of my six year old's underwear was a total bust), but I think some hair might be nice. Plus, if I get her a wig I can borrow it the next time I'm antsy for a makeover.

What was I talking about? Oh yeah, the hat! I've been eyeing this cable pattern for some time now, and finally decided that it would look nice with some lace accents. It also took me about a month to finish the thing with the move and all, so I'm glad I actually completed it. Furthermore, I managed to squeak out the small size with just one skein of the Superwash Sport, although you'll definitely need two if you're making the larger size. Oh my goodness, I just keep typing! Let's get to the hat already.

Sizes: adult small (adult medium/large)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash Sport (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #859 Lake Chelan Heather - one to two skeins (two skeins)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, one cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling, and one set of double pointed needles (dpn), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 6 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 5 circular needle, then, cast on 108 (120) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work our ribbing as follows for both sizes:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until hat measures roughly 1.5" (2"). Transfer work to your size US 6 circular needle. Then, and we'll begin the main pattern, which incorporates the Oxox Cable from page 255 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns and some lace strips. To knit it, you'll need to know these definitions:

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Bippity Boppity Beanie

Bippity Boppity Beanie

There are times when I feel like a perfectly ordinary adult woman going about her life in a perfectly ordinary fashion. Then I get terrible ideas (such as naming this hat the Bippity Boppity Beanie) and I JUST CAN'T LET THEM GO. Then it's clear that something went wrong somewhere. I blame my mother. 

Something I can't blame her for, however, is how magical this hat turned out (hence the name). Made with a basic striped knit and purl design, this hat's texture is both incredibly easy to achieve and optical illusion-tastic. So if you're ready to knit up a little magic, I highly recommend this beanie. Yes, it's unfortunate that you won't be able to tell your friends the name of the pattern out of sheer embarrassment. But perhaps you can just email them a link.*

* Double bonus: I made this hat with the leftovers from the Another Brick Cowl. Just in case you're bundle knitting for the holidays!

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8891 Cyan Blue - one skein (color A) & #9421 Blue Hawaii - one skein (color B)

A closer look. The pattern manages to give an
appearance of vertical color stripes despite the
fact they're horizontal.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6, one 16" circular needle in size US 5, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles 

So let's make a hat! First, then, using your size 5 needle and your color A yarn, cast on 114 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k3, p3; rep from *

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Another Brick Cowl

Another Brick Cowl

I created this week's design in response to another user request; specifically, I got feedback that someone was looking for a slipped stitch cowl pattern that used three colors, but in stripes rather than all at once (does that make any sense?). Anyway, I think it took me longer to settle on my color choices than it did on the slipped stitch pattern, especially since this one knits up beautifully and cleanly, without the stitch tugging effect that some such patterns can have. So, basically, if you're in the mood for a fun color project (or a scrap-buster; think what you could do with more colors!), this cowl might be just what you're looking for! :)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8010 Beige - one skein (color A), #9421 Blue Hawaii - one skein (color B), & #8891 Cyan Blue - one skein (color C)

A closer view of the slipped stitch pattern
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6; one 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles 

So let's make a cowl! First, then, using your size 5 needle and your color A yarn, cast on 120 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k2, p2; rep from *

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Lizard People Fingerless Gloves

Lizard People Fingerless Gloves

My husband had just one job with this project: to convince me not to call these mitts the "Lizard People Fingerless Gloves." Obviously, he failed. Luckily, it doesn't matter what I name them, since these fingerless gloves will remain beautifully textured and fun to make either way. So break out your favorite sport weight yarn and get started on a pair of fantastic gloves for all of your lizard friends!

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium up to 8 3/4", and the large goes up to about 9.5")

Yarn: Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8910 Citron - one skein

A closer look at the pattern.
It's lizard-y, no?
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make some mitts! Using your size 5 needles, cast on 40 (44; 48) stitches loosely and then divide among three double-pointed needles as follows: 12 stitches, 16 stitches, 12 stitches (14 stitches, 16 stitches, 14 stitches; 16 stitches, 16 stitches, 16 stitches). Then we'll work a ribbing row as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 6 times (all sizes). Transfer work to your size 6 needles. Then, we'll begin to incorporate a pattern stripe. All sizes can follow the same directions, below:

Row 1: knit

Row 2: knit across first needle, k4, p8, k4, knit across third needle

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Ribbon Cable Socks

Ribbon Cable Socks

It's been days, at least, since I last mentioned my obsession with Malabrigo yarn. Therefore I'll this opportunity to say it again: I am obsessed with Malabrigo yarn. Especially this lovely Arroyo fiber, a sport-weight superwash that, for me at least, knit up slightly smaller than gauge. And speaking of gauge, these socks are designed for a sport-weight fiber, but you will, as always with something as finicky as socks, want to check your gauge. And remember that your dpn knitting will probably look better on a thicker fiber knit with smaller needles than the opposite, so I would definitely try to gauge down a slightly larger fiber before I'd try to gauge up a finer fiber. Am I making any sense here? Feel free to hit me up with questions in the comments; in the meantime, let's get to the pattern.

Update: Please note that I updated gusset rows 6 & 12 and body rows 2 & 8 on May 31, 2017. :)

Sizes: adult small (adult medium; adult large) (for the record, small corresponds to the following US shoe sizes: women's 5 - 7 and men's 4 - 6, medium corresponds to women's 8 - 10 and men's 7 - 9, and large corresponds to women's 11 - 14 and men's 10 - 13)

Yarn: Malabrigo Arroyo (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 335 yards [305 meters]/100 grams); #046 Prussia Blue - one skein

A better view of the ol' snockerinos.
Not that anybody calls them that.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles in size US 4, cable needle (cn) or dpn for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch holder or scrap of yarn for holding stitches

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make some socks! Of course, before we get to that, I should mention that I'm using Ann Budd's delightful Getting Started Knitting Socks (Getting Started series) for the sizing and basic design elements of these socks, as well as a couple of Ribbon Stitch cables from page 245 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns for the stitch pattern. And now that that's covered, let's actually make those socks!

First, then, using a Long-Tail or an Old Norwegian Cast-On (for stretch) and your dpns, cast on 48 (52; 56) stitches, divide between 3 dpns as follows: 15, 18, 15 ([17, 18, 17]; [19, 18, 19]), and join in round. And since we're getting straight to the pattern, we'll need the following notation:

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Rib & Welt Baby Blanket

Rib & Welt Baby Blanket


It's embarrassing to admit, but I'll do it anyway; I started knitting this blanket very shortly after my six month old baby was born, and I only just finished it yesterday. Of course, that doesn't mean that I don't dig the pattern or anything - I do!!! It's reversible and everything!!! It is not, however, as quick of a knit as I'm used to, since it's basically a 26" wide x 29" high rectangle made out of sport weight yarn. That being said, if you're going to make a baby blanket, the Rib & Welt Baby Blanket is a pretty good option. It's strikingly graphic, and did I mention the whole reversible thing? Plus, the pattern is very easy to learn, and babies look super cute on it.

Yarn: Patons Beehive Baby Sport (70% Acrylic, 30% Nylon; 304 yards [278 meters]/85 grams); #11142 Little Boy - three skeins

The pattern
Needles: 24" or longer circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! First, then, cast on 174 stitches loosely. Then knit 1" in a * k1, p1 * ribbing. On your last row like this, place one stitch marker 10 stitches from the beginning of the row, another 82 stitches from the beginning, another 92 stitches from the beginning, and the final marker 10 stitches from the end of the row. And then let's proceed as follows in the main pattern, which incorporates two panels of Rib and Welt Diagonals from page 9 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. Like so, then:

Row 1: * k1, p1 * until you reach first marker, slip marker, then; * k1, p1, k1, p5; rep from * until you reach second marker. Slip marker, * k1, p1 * until third marker, slip marker, and then; * k1, p1, k1, p5 * until you reach final marker; slip marker, * k1, p1 * to end

Row 2 and all even rows: knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches, slipping all markers when you come to them

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Star Cluster Mini Shawl

Star Cluster Mini Shawl

I was only a few rows into the Twin Leaf Cowl when I realized that I absolutely wanted to work with the yarn again, especially since it was on clearance at my local store and I didn't know how much longer it would be available. So I bought another color of the stuff, this (in my opinion) gorgeous red. Then, I held on to it for a few months until inspiration struck in the form of this scarf-like thing, the Star Cluster Mini Shawl. Long story short, I've had this item on my mind for a while, and I couldn't be happier about how it turned out! As a warning, however, this item does use a few intermediate techniques, such as a provisional cast on and some short rows.

Yarn: Schoeller + Stahl Spray (100% Cotton; 153 yards [140 meters]/50 grams); #8 - two skeins

The pattern
Needles: Straight needles in size US 8, straight needles in size US 10 - 11

Notions: Tapestry needle
Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

To make this piece, we're going to begin in the middle, work one half, and then pick up stitches from the middle to work the other half again (by using a provisional cast on, not by actually picking up stitches). So, using your largest gauge needles and the provisional cast-on technique, cast on 71 stitches. Then switch to your size 8 needles and purl one row cross. Once that's done, we'll begin our pattern, which features the Star Cluster from page 217 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns and a decrease worked every odd row. First comes the terminology, and then the pattern.

Cluster 2 (c2): slip 2 stitches with yarn in back, bring yarn to front between needles, slip the same 2 stitches back to your left hand needle, pass yarn to back between needles, and then slip the same to stitches with yarn in back again

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Zigzag Ribbon Stitch Cowl

Zigzag Ribbon Stitch Cowl

There's only one way to intro this piece, and that's with an extensive discussion of the yarn. I knew I had been eyeing this particular fiber for awhile, but I didn't realize how long it had been until I finally bought it and brought it home. I say that, of course, because as much as I look for this yarn online, I can't find it. By the label alone, in fact, it appears to be the exact same yarn that I used for the Pretty Plum Cowl. But it isn't - it's lighter weight, and a different color. At the end of the day, then, all I can really tell you about this yarn is that it's a cotton bamboo blend that's more of a sport weight (even if the label calls it a dk).

And now that that's out of the way, let's talk about the pattern! Since I knit a lighter-weight yarn on slightly larger needles, the piece gets that nice stretched-stitch look. The subtle stitch pattern is also very suitable for both solids and variegated yarns, and adds nice texture to the piece. Furthermore, although this piece is knit back-and-forth, it's seamless, and is joined by a provisional cast-on and a Kitchener stitch graft. This gives the mesh neck even more delicacy, and really suits the airiness of this cowl!

Yarn: Schachenmayr smc Cotton Bamboo Batik (50% Cotton, 50% Bamboo; 131 yards [120 meters]/50 grams); #95 - one to two skeins (I got by with one)

Close-up, for your viewing pleasure
Needles: Size 6 straight needles

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches on size 4 needles

So let's get started! We're going to begin this piece with a provisional cast-on, instructions for which you can find here. So, using this technique, cast on 20 stitches. Then, knit the following set-up rows:

Set-up Row 1 (right side): knit

Set-up Row 2: purl

And once that's done, we're going to work the following row until the piece measures about 8" long and you've just finished a wrong-side row. So here's how you'll proceed:

Neck Row: k1, * yo, ssk; rep from *, end k1

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Arrowhead Lace Cowl II

Arrowhead Lace Cowl II

When I first bought this yarn, I had a certain idea of what to do with it. Then, of course, the minute I started knitting, I realized that this fiber was unsuited for my plan - although it drapes nicely in this particular piece, it was too stiff for my original design. And THEN I remembered how lovely the lace pattern from the original Arrowhead Lace Cowl was, and I knew I had a winner for this fiber. To create a more necklace-like appearance, I also decided to seam the stockinette portion at the back of this piece. This also keeps it a lighter weight for warmer weather!
The pattern, again.

Yarn: Schachenmayr smc Cotton Bamboo (75% Cotton, 50% Bamboo; 131 yards [120 meters]/50 grams); #64 Aqua - two skeins

Needles: 24" circular needle in size 4

Notions: Tapestry needle, five stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! First, cast on 181 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, knit 10, place first extra marker, k71, place second extra marker, k19, place third extra marker, and then knit until the you have 10 stitches left in the round and place your final extra marker. Then, knit until end of the round. And once that's done, it's time to begin our pattern, which incorporates Arrowhead Lace from page 193 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. As a side note, I read somewhere on the Internet (wish I remembered where!) that you can straighten out your ssk's by knitting the ssk stitch through the back loop when you come to it on the next round. I used that technique. You can too, if you want! Anyway, we'll proceed as follows: