Wednesday, February 10, 2016

I'm Lichen This Hat

I'm Lichen This Hat
No, really. I'm really, really, REALLY lichen it.

If recent years have taught me anything, it's that I am one of about six Americans who would rather eat rocks than watch a televised singing competition. Of course, I do have one odd exception to my music-free reality television preferences, the always-delightful The Sing-Off (I'm also lying when I say it's always delightful - 2014's weird Christmas special was no good. I miss Sara Bareilles). What's my point here? OH YEAH, PUNS! I think I like the show because of the constant and terrible puns that are constantly coming forth from host Nick Lachey's mouth. And, based on the name I came up with for this pattern, I also think the nice folks on TV's best a cappella singing competition program might tap me as a writer if the show ever gets another season.

Speaking of this hat, I got the design idea from a strange, ruched-looking entrance way I pass by every day on my way to my kids' schools, but you're just going to have to take my word for it because I've been too lazy to take a picture. I did get a lovely shot of some similarly-colored lichen, though, which made for a better pattern name anyway. You can find that below!

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #031 Mostaza - one skein

A better view of the back, cute little
braid and all!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10, one 16" circular needle in size US 11 needle, one set of double pointed needles in size US 11, and a cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, 4 stitch markers

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 11 needles

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 10 circular needle, then, cast on 66 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a few edging rows, for which you'll need the following terminology. Remember you can always skip your cable needle, if you'd like.

back cross (bc): slip 2 stitches to cn and hold in back; k2, k2 from cn

front cross (fc): slip 2 stitches to cn and hold in front; k2, k2 from cn

And once you've got that covered, we'll continue like so:

I'm also lichen this lichen!
Edging Rows 1, 3, & 5: knit until you have 8 stitches left in row, p1, k6, p1

Edging Row 2: knit until you have 8 stitches left in row, p1, bc, k2, p1

Edging Row 4: knit until you have 8 stitches left in row, p1, k2, fc, p1

Knit edging rows 1 - 5. Transfer work to your size 11 circular needle. And then we'll move to the main pattern, which goes as follows. And, as a note, it's important to leave the yarn behind your six slipped stitches loose-ish, but it's not as important as it would be in mosaic knitting, so you don't need to stress about it too much! Anyway, let's work like so:

Row 1: knit until you have 8 stitches left in row, p1, bc, k2, p1

Rows 2 & 3: knit until you have 8 stitches left in row, p1, slip 6 with yarn in back (sl6 wyib), p1

Row 4: knit until you have 8 stitches left in row, p1, k2, fc, p1

Rows 5 & 6: knit until you have 8 stitches left in row, p1, sl6 wyib, p1

Knit row 1 - 6 four times, and then knit rows 1 - 4 once more. Now, we'll knit one marker placement row (which will also serve as a decrease row), as follows: 

Marker Placement Row: k1, ssk, k19, k2tog, place marker, k10, place marker, ssk, k19, k2tog, place marker, k1, p1, sl6 wyib, p1 (62 stitches)

Knit this row, and then we'll continue in our decrease as follows:

Decrease Row 1: k1, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before next marker, k2tog, slip marker, k1, p1, sl6 wyib, p1 (-4 stitches)

Decrease Row 2: k1, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before next marker, k2tog, slip marker, k1, p1, bc, k2, p1 (-4 stitches)

Decrease Rows 3 & 4: k1, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before next marker, k2tog, slip marker, k1, p1, sl6 wyib, p1 (-4 stitches) 

Decrease Row 5: k1, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before next marker, k2tog, slip marker, k1, p1, k2, fc, p1 (-4 stitches)

Decrease Row 6: k1, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until you're two stitches before next marker, k2tog, slip marker, k1, p1, sl6 wyib, p1 (-4 stitches)

Knit decrease rows 1 - 6 once, and knit decrease rows 1 - 3 once more, remembering to transfer work to your dpns once it gets too small for the circulars. Then we'll knit one final row, as follows, during which you can remove any extra stitch markers you may still have in place:

Final Row: k2, k2tog, k10, ssk, k2, p1, sl6 wyib, p1

Complete this final row, after which you should have 24 stitches left. Our next step will be to divide our remaining 24 stitches into two groups of 12. We'll do this by knitting the first two stitches of the next row, and then transferring the following 12 stitches to a dpn for grafting. Place remaining 12 stitches on a second dpn (and yes, this means that the end of your row will end up between the tenth and eleventh of those twelve stitches, and not at the end, and those first two knit stitches will be the last two stitches of these twelve). Using the Kitchener stitch, graft these final 24 stitches together. Tuck in ends and block, if desired. 






37 comments:

  1. So does that make #7 on that list? I'd rather stab out my eardrums with an ice pick than watch people butcher classics with endless trilling.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, most recently I tried watching the first season of the Voice (I realize that was like five years ago, but I'm still suffering flashbacks). Needless to say, that didn't last!!!

      Delete
  2. That is a great hat. A beautiful built in slouch! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yay! Glad you like it. I thought it was a fun idea! :)

      Delete
  3. Oh gosh!!! I can see why you're lichen it too. Awesome
    little pattern.
    Cheers, Anita.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Anita! I thought it was another fun thing to do with bulky yarn!!! :)

      Delete
    2. LOVE this hat! Can't wait to get some pretty wool and get started! Cold in Canada at the moment! Thanks for sharing!
      Am knitting The Rib Cable Hat right now. A great pattern!

      Delete
    3. Yay! Glad to hear you like it! And please, let me know if you have any questions about either pattern. I'm always happy to help!!! :)

      Delete
    4. What is the recommended wool weight for this hat?

      Delete
    5. Hi there! This is bulky/chunky weight yarn. And, just so you know, I do tag each pattern with this information as well - you can find it at the bottom of the post, where it says "labels." :)

      Delete
  4. You're no slouch when it comes to puns. Or cute hats!
    If you've nothing better to do with this hat, save it for me!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Gretchen, I adore this pattern! I have short hair and it looks cute even on me. Fun to make too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wonderful, I'm so glad to hear it! :)

      Delete
  6. Cannot wait to cast this on my needles; it's giving me more motivation to hurry up and finish a baby blanket. Great patter! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad you like it! :) And glad I could provide motivation on the baby blanket - I always lose steam about 2/3rds of the way through those!!!

      Delete
  7. Love this hat. When slipping stitches are they done purl wise or knit wise? Thanks for all the lovely patterns.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Purlwise, so they don't get twisted! :) And let me know if you have any other questions!!!

      Delete
  8. So cute! I'm in the middle of it now but starting to run out of my skein. How many inches would you say it is before the decrease?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's about 8" along the front of the hat (and less at the back, of course, since it gathers). Hope you make it! :)

      Delete
  9. Hi Gretchen, Really cute pattern! I'm just starting and I'm confused about the cable. There are 8 working stitches, 2 purl and 6 knit. But in the directions for the cable it slip 2, K2, then knit the 2 from the cable holder. That's 4. So now there are 2 K stitches before the purl. What am I doing wrong?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Hope!

      Yes, the cable itself is 6 stitches, but it's a braid so you're only working 4 in each actual cable twist. When you find the bc and the fc in pattern, then, you'll also find them with a k2 indicated on one side or the other to account for all 6 cable stitches. Let me know if that doesn't make sense, or if you have any other questions!!!

      Delete
  10. I just love this hat! I made one for myself, but, unfortunately, I have a head the size of a small watermelon, and mine just kept inching it's way off. I have to say my 3 year old granddaughter looks adorable in it even though it's a tad large on her. You don't have an extra large version written up?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not yet but I'm happy to work on one! How many extra inches in circumference do you think you need? :)

      Delete
    2. My head is 23" just above the ears. I've only been knitting for two years and so I figured I could just add stockinette in to accommodate the extra girth, but not so sure what to do at the top end. I'd love to be able to make one for me because it really is an adorable hat. This will be my fourth hat of your collection and I'm looking forward to many more. Thanks for all of your designs!

      Delete
    3. Ah ha, so the circumference is fine but it needs more length? That's an easy fix! When the pattern says, "Knit row 1 - 6 four times, and then knit rows 1 - 4 once more," go ahead and knit rows 1 - 6 six times, and then 1 - 4 once more instead. That should give you plenty of extra room to keep it on your head! Also, if it's just a little tight, you could always go up a needle size as well. That will make it just a tad bit slouchier! :)

      Delete
    4. I'll try this and see if that fix works. Thanks!

      Delete
  11. Do you think a recent high school grad would like this hat?

    I think it's cool, in a San Diego type of way. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think this hat is definitely appropriate for that age range... and please, let me know if you have any other questions! :)

      Delete
  12. Thanks so much for designing and publishing this awesome, awesome hat! I've made one and am taking it with me for my first visit to New York City next month. Actually, it's my first visit to the USA so I'm super excited. So, a big thank you from a fan in Melbourne, Australia!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yay!!! I'm so glad you like it! And I hope you have a wonderful time in NYC... Eat some tacos for me!!! :)

      Delete
  13. "would rather eat rocks than watch a televised singing competition"
    OMG, I love you!! ....and the hat (which is how I found you, LOL)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad someone thinks I'm funny!!! And I really am serious about the rocks thing... ;)

      Delete
  14. Can you knit this pattern on straight needles not very good with circular knitting

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there!

      So I've looked at the pattern again and I think I *can* write it for straights, but it will include some funky details (like cabling on a wrong-side row and some weird stuff with the finish). If you're okay with that, let me know and I'll work it up! :)

      Delete