Wednesday, November 12, 2014

All in the Family Earflap Hat

All in the Family Earflap Hat
Child Size

Although I've made hats of many other silhouettes, a reader recently reminded me that I had yet to post an earflap. And this reminder instantly reminded me of yet another thing - namely, that the last time I made an earflap hat, I had far fewer knitting techniques in my toolbox, and ended up having to cobble together a hat, some flaps, and some weird cast-ons with a crocheted edging, to hide the mess. Now that I've progressed, however, I designed this All in the Family Earflap Hat with a basic but rather elegant design that uses a provisional cast on for a seamless, nicely finished look. Plus, it doesn't require any crocheted hoo-ha for the edging (although of course you're welcome to crochet as much hoo-ha as you like; no judgment here). Also, as a note, I should mention that, though I very much enjoyed this yarn, I found the gauge recommendations to be WAY off. Thusly (and especially with a basic stockinette hat such as this), I highly recommend that you check your gauge before accidentally knitting a hat that would fit the Jolly Green Giant better than your kid.

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Small Adult; Large Adult) (in measurements, and roughly, the toddler size should fit an 18" - 19" inch head, the child a 19.5" - 21" inch head, the small adult up to a 21" head, and the large adult up to a 23" head)

Yarn: Berroco Ultra Alpaca (50% Alpaca, 50% Wool; 215 yards [198 meters]/100 grams); #6288 Blueberry Mix - 1 skein

From the side.
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 8, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 8, and one 10 or 10 1/2 needle for the provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 16 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! Using your largest needle and a provisional cast on, cast on 70 (77; 77; 84) stitches. Then, transfer stitches to your size 8 circular needle, place marker, and join in round. Knit until piece measures about 5.5" (6"; 7.5"; 8"), and then we'll begin the decreases, as follows. Remember to switch to your dpns once you're down to about 60 stitches.

Decrease Row 1: * k5, k2tog; rep from *

Decrease Row 2: knit

Decrease Row 3: * k4, k2tog *

Decrease Row 4: knit

Decrease Row 5: * k3, k2tog *

Decrease Row 6: * k2, k2tog *

Decrease Row 7: * k1, k2tog *

Decrease Row 8: * k2tog *

Decrease Row 9: for child and small adult: k1, * k2tog *  (for toddler and large adult: * k2tog *)

Clip tail and thread through final 5 (6; 6; 6)  stitches. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. And now that the majority of the hat is done, it's time to work on the earflaps. With that in mind, transfer 9 stitches from either side of the break in your provisional cast on (which also aligns with the hat's back seam) to a scrap of yarn to hold for later (all sizes). Then, beginning on either side of the transferred stitches, we'll start working the flaps. So, on whichever side you please, transfer the next 15 (15; 17; 19) stitches from the provisional cast on to your dpns to work back and forth. Then we'll proceed as follows for both sizes:

Earflap Rows 1, 3, 5 ,& 7 (right side): knit

Earflap Rows 2, 4, 6, & 8: purl

And once these eight rows are done, we'll work a few extra rows for the two adult sizes. If you're knitting either of the smaller sizes, skip straight to the next instruction.

Extra Row 1 (adult large only): ssk, k15, k2tog

Extra Row 2 (adult large only): purl

Extra Row 3 (both adult sizes): ssk, k13, k2tog

Extra Row 4 (both adult sizes): purl

And now that you've knit your extra rows if you're making an adult size, we'll knit the following decrease rows for all sizes:

Decrease Row 1: ssk, k11, k2tog

Decrease Row 2: purl

Decrease Row 3: (ssk) twice, k5, (k2tog) twice

Decrease Row 4: purl

Decrease Row 5: (ssk) twice, k1, (k2tog) twice

Once these rows are done, your dpns will come in super handy, since it's time to work roughly 8" (10"; 12"; 14") in a 5-stitch I-cord (these numbers are estimates only - if you want truly functional knotting I-cords, you may want to work a few more inches. If you're just going for cuteness, my estimates should suffice). Once your I-cord is complete, bind off loosely and repeat with other ear flap. Finally, transfer stitches from front of hat to circular needle (or straight needles, if you want - it's all back and forth from here) and knit the following rows:

Edging Rows 1 & 3 (right side): purl

Edging Row 2 & 4: knit

Bind off loosely, and then repeat with the provisional stitches from the back of the hat. Stitch both purled edges in place where they naturally curl under. Tuck in ends and make and attach pompom, if desired. Block earflaps, if nothing else. Oh, and I highly recommend that you knit at least two matching hats, for optimal family adorability, or at least make one for your dog.





109 comments:

  1. hat looks so cute, got to make it for a greatgranddaughter in pink with flower, thanks for the pattern.

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    1. That sounds adorable! And please, let me know if you have any questions while you're making it. I'm always happy to help :)

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    2. Dear Gretchen I have never used one of your patterns before but I really liked this one and I do appreciate so much your letting me print it for free. I belong to a senior center group that knits for charity. I've wanted a ear flap hat for a long time. So thanks a lot!

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    3. Hi Pat!

      Yes, the PrintFriendly function is awesome! It really makes Internet printing a lot more manageable. Anyway, I hope you enjoy the pattern! Please let me know if you have any questions. :)

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    4. I've never used circular needles before. Can I use straight needles instead.

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    5. Hi there!

      Unfortunately, I've never adapted this pattern for straight needles and I'm not sure it's very well-suited for the conversion. However, I highly encourage you to give circular needles a shot (although you may want to try something that doesn't decrease - like a cowl - first). You can find tons of knitting tutorials and videos online by just searching "how to knit in the round," and once you get started it's actually easier than a lot of flat knitting since you never have to deal with any wrong-side rows! :)

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  2. I work with Dr A in Dallas. He told me about your blog! Love it. Do you knit for others and sell?

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    1. Hi Alexandra! I'm glad you like my blog (and, of course, that my father-in-law recommended it) :) And mostly I just knit for others and give stuff away - I have piles of knit goods laying around the house. The kids and the husband wear tons of it too!

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  3. Actually my name is Kim, Alexandra is my daughter and the title of my blog. I was wondering if I could pay you to make 2 of the Kids' Bowknot Cowls in Ivory for my 5 and 7 year old girls.

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    1. Well then hello Kim! And why don't you email me at ballstothewallsknits@gmail.com and we can discuss it? :)

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  4. Is this your daughter modeling? She looks almost exactly like my grandaughter!

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    1. No, he's actually my son. He's just very pretty :)

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    2. You are hilarious!! Love all your funny quips. I just MIGHT knit one for my dogs but def won't be doing any crochet hoo-haa as I cannot crochet anyway!! BUT I did find a pattern for some tiny knitted "Flutterbys" yesterday so am going to add a few of those. Not for moi of course, but for my Granddaughter. X

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    3. Thank you, I think I'm funny, but my children usually disagree... Anyway, that sounds absolutely adorable!!! I hope it turns out very nicely, and let me know if you have any questions! :)

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  5. I'm a beginner knitter. I can follow a pattern but some of the terms and techniques are new to me. What is a provisional cast on?

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    1. Hello there!

      In general, you can find pattern notation things on my glossary page, here: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/p/glossary-of-knitting-terms.html

      And as far as the provisional cast on is concerned, it's a bit of an intermediate technique, but certainly manageable with practice! :) You can find more info here: http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEfall05/FEATfall05TT.html. If you search youtube, you can also find some videos with alternative techniques, although I haven't found one that I love. Hopefully some day I'll put one together, when I have time!

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  6. I love the hat and wondering if its possible to do the same as a felted hat? Kristen

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    1. Oh wow! Now that's an idea :) I'm sure it would be possible, and I would be happy to scale up a version of the pattern if you wanted to try it. However, I definitely couldn't guarantee perfection without trying first myself, as felting can be tricky. The hat would also lose any stretch if it were felted, of course, so it might end up fitting a bit more like a helmet.

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    2. hadn't considered the helmet possibility. I would still like to give it a go, understanding that there's no guarantee. I went on line to see if I could find a discussion on moving a knitting pattern to a felted pattern. In the end some helpful folks indicated its important to knit a swatch (of sorts) and felt it in order to get measurements. Thanks for your thoughts on this. Kristen

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    3. Cool! Find your yarn, knit a swatch, felt it, and give me before and after measurements and I'll make you a hat pattern to try out! :) And it doesn't matter if your gauge doesn't match this hat gauge, either!

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    4. marvelous. thanks. I'll do that. Kristen

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    5. swatch done. Started with 20 rows, 20 stitches; 7.5" x 6.5".
      After felting it is 7.5" x 4.5". I felted it only enough to shrink, but not produce the tight helmet feel. As the on-line chat indicated, it seems that the width change. If you can work your and produce a pattern for the fun ear flap hat I would delighted. Kristen

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    6. correction: the width did not change; only the length.

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    7. Great! Last question: what size hat do you want to make? And I'm going to be out and about for a bit, but I'll get to this as soon as I can.

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    8. Merry Christmas morning. I'm in no hurry for this. adult male (biggish head). Kristen

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    9. Hi Kristen!

      I hope you had a lovely Christmas. And guess what, I got you something! It's a knitting pattern. Surprise!!! And now that I'm done being funny, please feel free to ask if you have any questions. And you are absolutely obligated to tell me how it turns out, even if it's a disaster! :)

      Gauge: 11 stitches = 4 inches

      Felting reduction: 70% length; 100% width

      So let's get started! Using your largest needle (I don’t know what needle you knit this on, but you’re going to need a bigger one for this cast on, or two needles held together) and a provisional cast on, cast on 64 stitches. Then, transfer stitches to your gauge-producing circular needle, place marker, and join in round. Knit until piece measures about 11", and then we'll begin the decreases, as follows. Remember to switch to your dpns once you're down to about 44 stitches.

      Decrease Row 1: * k6, k2tog; rep from * (56 stitches)

      Decrease Row 2: knit

      Decrease Row 3: * k5, k2tog * (48 stitches)
      Decrease Row 4: * k4, k2tog * (40 stitches)
      Decrease Row 5: * k3, k2tog * (32 stitches)

      Decrease Row 6: * k2, k2tog * (24 stitches)

      Decrease Row 7: * k1, k2tog * (16 stitches)

      Decrease Row 8: * k2tog * (8 stitches)

      Clip tail and thread through final 8 stitches. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. And now that the majority of the hat is done, it's time to work on the earflaps. With that in mind, transfer 5 stitches from either side of the break in your provisional cast on (which also aligns with the hat's back seam) to a scrap of yarn to hold for later. Then, beginning on either side of the transferred stitches, we'll start working the flaps. So, on whichever side you please, transfer the next 13 stitches from the provisional cast on to your dpns to work back and forth. Then we'll proceed as follows for both sizes:

      Earflap Rows 1, 3, & 5 (right side): knit

      Earflap Rows 2, 4, & 6: purl

      Decrease Row 1: ssk, k11, k2tog

      Decrease Row 2: purl

      Decrease Row 3: (ssk) twice, k5, (k2tog) twice

      Decrease Row 4: purl

      Decrease Row 5: (ssk) twice, k1, (k2tog) twice
      Decrease Row 6: ssk, k1, k2tog

      Once these rows are done, your dpns will come in super handy, since it's time to work roughly 20” in a 3-stitch I-cord (these numbers are estimates only - if you want truly functional knotting I-cords, you may want to work a few more inches. If you're just going for cuteness, my estimates should suffice). Once your I-cord is complete, bind off loosely and repeat with other ear flap. Finally, transfer stitches from front of hat to circular needle (or straight needles, if you want - it's all back and forth from here) and knit the following rows:

      Edging Rows 1 & 3 (right side): purl

      Edging Row 2 & 4: knit

      Bind off loosely, and then repeat with the provisional stitches from the back of the hat. Stitch both purled edges in place where they naturally curl under, if desired. Felt, and pray for the best :)

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    10. ok, I'm on it. I'll let you know how it turns out, success or not! thank you for this pattern. Kristen

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    11. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you! :)

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  7. Do you think it would be poss to add earflaps to a hat already knitted?

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    1. Absolutely! You can simply pick up stitches where you'd like the flaps. (here's a tutorial, if you need one: http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEwinter04/FEATwin04TT.html) Of course I don't know the specifics of your project, but if you need any help designing the flaps, let me know the gauge and how big you'd like the flaps and I can help with that too! :)

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  8. May I know wat is ssk and k11 means knit 11 stitches?

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    1. Hi Petrina!

      In general, you can find the answers to any terminology questions you have here, on my glossary page: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/p/glossary-of-knitting-terms.html

      That being said, an ssk is a left-leaning decrease (it stands for slip, slip, knit). Here are some instructions for it: http://www.lionbrand.com/faq/80.html?language=

      And yes, k11 means knit 11 stitches.
      Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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    2. Thanks.

      I'm doing it on 24 pegs round loom. U have any instruction guides on that?

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    3. No, I'm sorry, I've never done any loom knitting. I did a quick google search, though, and came up with these articles that address the subject:

      http://www.goodknitkisses.com/Resources/converting-knitting-patterns-to-loom/

      http://www.lisaclarke.net/2013/02/05/loom-knit-earwarmer/

      http://loomknittinghelp.com/intro/convert.html

      Maybe one of them can help! :)

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    4. Many thanks. You are so sweet and helpful. Have a blessed day.

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    5. You too, and thank you! I am always happy to help. :)

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  9. Hi Petrina,
    As I am in New Zealand our wools are different.
    Can I adjust this pattern to suit Double Knit wool (8ply) and can it be knitted in 4ply.
    I love the look of the pattern but the wool gauge is not right for me.

    Di

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    1. Hi Di!

      Can you tell me the gauge you're thinking, and the size you'd like to make the hat? I can certainly help you modify the pattern with a bit more information. :)

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  10. My gauge worked out to be size 10 needles. Does this mean I use 11 or 13 needles for the provisional cast on?

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    1. I would just go for the elevens! I've seen recommendations to use needles held together, or quite larger needles, but I actually think that a bit smaller is better. :)

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  11. Hi Gretchen,
    I'd like to use 8ply wool and knit for a 16.5 inch to 17.5 inch head (1 year old child)

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    1. Hi Dianne!

      I think you can probably just use one of the sizes more or less as-is for that, but I'd like to know your exact gauge to be sure! Can you tell me how many stitches you're getting per four inches?

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  12. Hi Gretchen,
    Thanks for the reply.
    I get 22 stitches to 4 inches on US 6 needles.

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    1. Oh, nuts! That gauge is actually a bit too small to convert this pattern without rewriting the whole thing. If you're really interested in seeing a basic earflap hat in that gauge, however, I'll add it to my list! :)

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  13. Thanks for checking for me. But it is not that important as there are other patterns around. The problem is that in New Zealand we use UK style wools that are different from the US ones. But thank you so much for looking into it for me. :)

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    1. I'm sorry I couldn't help you more! Let me know if you have any other questions. :) And I could be wrong, but I think that this conversion chart might help you navigate the yarn differences: http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/weight.html

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  14. I am making this hat for my grandson and it's coming out great, especially since it's my first hat. I have 2 questions about the final steps. When binding off the back provisional stitches and the front hat atitches, do you bind off purlwise? Also how do you stitch down the purl edged curl? Thanks

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    1. Hi Karen!

      I'm glad to hear that this hat is turning out well. :) As far as your questions are concerned - you can bind off by either purling or knitting, it doesn't really matter. That edge will curl under either way (in general, I do knit bind offs, because I prefer them). As for the stitching - I basically just used a whipstitch to hold it in place. Here's a link to some instructions: http://www.wikihow.com/Whipstitch. Again, though, this shouldn't show, so it's not a huge deal if it's not perfect. And you don't even HAVE to stitch it in place, since it will curl under no matter what :)

      Finally, this comment posted twice, so I'm going to delete the duplicate. Just thought I'd let you know! :)

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  15. Hi Gretchen,
    Thank you so much for your prompt reply. When doing the whipstitch, do you use yarn or thread? Sorry for the duplicate post. I didn't think the first one went through. Also sorry for so many questions. I'm a relatively new knitter.
    Thanks,
    Karen

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    1. No worries! I'm always happy to answer questions. :) And I used yarn for the whipstitch, and basically just made a technique up that worked for me. As you've probably noticed, most patterns give you a lot of leeway when it comes to finishing instructions, so you can kind of just do what works for you.

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    2. Thank you so much! You've been very helpful!

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  16. Hi Gretchen. I'm about to start this pattern and can't wait for my 5 year old to wear it. I've read your pattern twice and can't figure out where the breaks in the provisional casting are located. Do you mind sending explaining please? Thank you!

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    1. Ah, after reading your pattern for a 3rd time, I think I understand. Is the break in the provisional casting the place marker? And when you write to transfer 9 stitches on either side, do you mean 18 stitches total? Thanks again!

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    2. Yes, the break is just where it's joined in the round, and I mean 18 stitches total! Let me know if you have any more questions. :)

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  17. Replies
    1. This pattern is perfect! I knitted two hats for my 2 (toddler) and 5 (child) year old. Thanks again!

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  18. The amount of stiches is the same for child and small adult, is this correct?

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    1. Yes, that's correct! The adult hat will be longer, but not bigger in circumference. :)

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  19. Hey there! I noticed most of the hat is KNIT... However from your cute photos it looks like the entire hat is knit and purl? Is this correct? Thanks!

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    1. Hi Sandy!

      Yes, there's no stitch pattern to this hat besides the basic knit and purl. Let me know if you have any other questions. :)

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  20. Hi,
    Do you have a pattern for the ear flap hat using straight needles. I would be using 4 MM knitting needles which I think convert to number 6 US needles and DK wool and our DK wool is I think the same as your 8 ply. By the way I am in New Zealand. Cheers, Paulette

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    1. Hi Paulette!

      Unfortunately, I don't currently have a pattern for a flat knit earflap hat, and my current circular patterns wouldn't be easy to convert. I'll add it to my project list, though. :)

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  21. It's templa here again!! So wierd...surfing the net for a great ear flap hat for my husband and what do you know....it's yours! Again! Lol....can't thank u enough for your great stuff! All the girls loved their iris bloom bonnets for xmas....and this will b my first hat finishing with dpns...not scared..just try to avoid lol....so thanks again for all your amazing patterns....I just need to always check here first!

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    1. What a lovely compliment, thank you! :) I'm glad you're enjoying my patterns. And you could always try the Magic Loop on the decrease if you're more familiar with that technique. Either way, I know you can do it!!! And please, let me know if you have any questions.

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    2. Ok....on the decrease....because I've been using a stockenette stitch the entire hat...not seed stitch.....when I'm decreasing and if i only use knitting to decrease will it look off? Or should I alter the decrease rows with purl and knits? I hope all this makes sense :) thanks for any help

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    3. N/m lol....I see it...thinking of straight needles...duh :)

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    4. Sigh...ok...why the provisional cast on? I'm just confused because it's usually used for a seamless bind off and not sure when I'm all done do I just leave my cast on just like it is...or do I remove the yarn in the middle of my cast on...I'm really confused ...I'm hope this one makes sense too :)

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    5. Hi again!

      The provisional cast on makes it totally seamless, so you can have your bind off at your bottom edge, but still get the earflaps and whatnot (since the parts are worked differently down there once you get done with the top of the hat. Ordinarily I just work up from a cast on edge, but then of course the edge is just straight. The provisional cast on allows me more freedom of shape). And I'm not quite sure I understand your question about the provisional cast on - are you wondering about the yarn scrap you used to make it? If so, you will simply transfer your stitches back from the yarn onto your needles and discard the scrap. If I'm not understanding you correctly let me know! :)

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    6. Oh dear.....so if I left my scrap yarn in and just continued....I think I started it all wrong...so when I do my provisional cast on I should transfer onto my circular needles through the space where I took the scrap yarn out? I'm sorry...ive never stated a hat with a provisional cast before and Noone else is having a problem...I think I'm just confused....the way I have it now is if I take out my scrap yarn the edges will b just loops...ugh...I feel kinda silly ...I hope I'm making sense :)

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  22. This is turning into a book...but I think my light just turned on! Tell me if I'm getting this right....as I'm working my ear flaps and finishing the edging I will b removing my scrap yarn as I go??! Oh please say ....you got it!!

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    1. Hi again!

      I can't see your work, but it sounds like you have it! Basically you will be working your remaining stitches (held by the scrap yarn) in bits - separately for each earflap and the front and back edging. I hope it's working for you now! :)

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    2. Jeez....I thought I was loosing my knitting skills! Lol....thank u so very much for keeping up on answering my questions. ..I don't know how u do it but yay! I think I got it too.....finally..you're a gem!

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    3. Yay is right! And I like to help. :) I understand that sometimes written instructions simply don't make sense to a person, so I try to clarify. I'm hoping to start adding more videos to my site once my little one starts childcare, so maybe I'll be able to make new patterns extra clear. :)

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    4. That would be wonderful!

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    5. Well I've added a few at least... hopefully more to come! :)

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  23. This is such a cute hat! Thank you for your pattern! I have a question about the front and back curled purl edge. I'm new to knitting and struggle a bit with reading patterns. I read it as, from the front side of the hat, purl the first row, then knit, purl, knit and bind off with a purl stitch? My edge curled down instead of up like I think it looks in the pictures. Did I do it backwards? Thank you!

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    1. Nope! It does, indeed, curl down so I think you're in good shape! :)

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    2. Oh perfect! Thank you, I really appreciate your prompt response! Love this pattern and will be knitting it again!

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    3. Great! Let me know if you have any other questions!!!

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  24. Hello!! I am a new knitter, having only made a baby blanket for my son 6 months ago. But I love this hat and found it while searching for an ear flap to make for family pics! I'll be making this hat for a 6 month old boy, 12 month girl, and 4 yo girl. So I'm planning to follow the pattern as written for the 4 year old but how to make it small enough for the babies? I'm also thinking of making the hats in heather gray and making different color Pom poms at the top. What do think?

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    1. Hi there!

      I think your color choices sound adorable! :) And I totally think that this hat will work for what you're planning, and is feasible for most skill levels, although it does use a few slightly more advanced techniques (notably the provisional cast-on). As far as sizing goes, the toddler size should be a good fit on your 12 month old as long as your gauge is accurate, and the child size will be perfect for your 4 year old. Give me a couple of days and I'll post a version for your little one as well!

      Oh, and as a side note: like I said, the toddler size should work on your 12 month old, although there will be a little room to grow. If you want the hat to fit more precisely for the picture, go ahead and leave 1/2" off the length (so start the decreases at 5" rather than 5.5"). :)

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    2. Yay! You wrote back!! πŸ˜ƒπŸ˜ƒ thank you so much for your help! My yarn is coming tomorrow! I can't wait. The two hats will give me plenty to do in the meantime. Thank you xs 1000000! The I cord sounds a bit challenging, but I'll just watch that video till I get it. And practice on my cheap yarn 😜

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    3. Of course! And a couple of tips: first off, you shouldn't have any trouble with the i-cord, but make sure to knit an inch or two before you judge your work. They all look terrible for the first few rows! And secondly, you may want a smaller needle for the provisional cast-on, it depends on how tight you make your yarn. Again, you may want to practice swatching your cast on with 10 stitches or so to see how it turns out before you commit to the whole hat! Anyway, I'm posting the pattern in a separate comment below. Let me know if you have any questions! :)

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    4. 6 Month Pattern

      Gauge: 16 stitches = 4 inches

      So let's get started! Using your largest needle and a provisional cast on, cast on 63 stitches. Then, transfer stitches to your size 8 circular needle, place marker, and join in round. Knit until piece measures about 4.5” and then we'll begin the decreases, as follows. You’ll want to transfer work to your dpns immediately

      Decrease Row 1: * k5, k2tog; rep from * (54 stitches)

      Decrease Row 2: knit

      Decrease Row 3: * k4, k2tog * (45 stitches)

      Decrease Row 4: knit

      Decrease Row 5: * k3, k2tog * (36 stitches)

      Decrease Row 6: * k2, k2tog * (27 stitches)

      Decrease Row 7: * k1, k2tog * (18 stitches)

      Decrease Row 8: * k2tog * (9 stitches)

      Decrease Row 9: k1, * k2tog *  (5 stitches)

      Clip tail and thread through final 5  stitches. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. And now that the majority of the hat is done, it's time to work on the earflaps. With that in mind, transfer 8 stitches from either side of the break in your provisional cast on (which also aligns with the hat's back seam) to a scrap of yarn to hold for later (all sizes). Then, beginning on either side of the transferred stitches, we'll start working the flaps. So, on whichever side you please, transfer the next 13 stitches from the provisional cast on to your dpns to work back and forth. Then we'll proceed as follows for both sizes:

      Earflap Rows 1, 3, & 5 (right side): knit

      Earflap Rows 2, 4, & 6: purl

      Earflap Row 7: ssk, k9, k2tog (11 stitches)

      Earflap Row 8: purl

      Earflap Row 9: (ssk) twice, k3, (k2tog) twice (7 stitches)

      Earflap Row 10: purl

      Earflap Row 11: ssk, slip 2 stitches together knitwise-k1-pass 2 slipped stitches over (sl2-k1-p2sso), ktog (3 stitches)

      Once these rows are done, your dpns will come in super handy, since it's time to work roughly 6” in a 3-stitch I-cord (these numbers are estimates only - if you want truly functional knotting I-cords, you may want to work a few more inches. If you're just going for cuteness, my estimates should suffice). Once your I-cord is complete, bind off loosely and repeat with other ear flap. Finally, transfer stitches from front of hat to circular needle (or straight needles, if you want - it's all back and forth from here) and knit the following rows:

      Edging Rows 1 & 3 (right side): purl

      Edging Row 2 & 4: knit

      Bind off loosely, and then repeat with the provisional stitches from the back of the hat. Stitch both purled edges in place where they naturally curl under. Tuck in ends and make and attach pompom, if desired. Block earflaps, if nothing else.

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  25. Hello! I've looked up how to ssk and there are a few different versions! Which of these 3 ways did you use, or was it something else altogether...
    1. Slip knit wise, slip knit wise, transfer slipped stitches back onto left needle, knit through the back of both of the transferred slipped stitches
    2. Slip knit wise, slip purl wise, put left needle into the front of the 2 slipped stitches on the right needle and knit.
    3. Slip knit wise, slip knit wise, left needles into the front of 2 slipped stitches on the right needle and knit.

    πŸ˜ƒ Thanks again for your help!

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    1. Hi! I use the first method - here's my video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ohoxYqOT-s

      :)

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  26. Love this design!! Trying it out for my twins. I'm new to knitting what size would you recommend for the dpns. I assume 8" would be too small and would need at least 10", what size would you recommend? Thanks

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    1. Hi Jennifer!

      I always use the 8" ones... By the time you get to that part of the pattern you can always just push your stitches together, and you shouldn't have any chance of them falling off as you work! :)

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  27. Hi there! I love this toque and am most of the way through, but am stuck on the ear flaps. Could you please help me understand how to "transfer 9 stitches from either side of the break in your provisional cast on (which also aligns with the hat's back seam) to a scrap of yarn to hold for later (all sizes)"? Thank you for the free pattern and it's awesome that you've been replying to so many people over the years.

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    1. Hi Shawna!

      All I'm trying to say is that your row marker should mark the back seam of the hat, and that you'd like your ear flaps to end up evenly spaced on either side of the back seam. So when you transfer nine stitches from either side of the row marker to a scrap of yarn to work later, the next stitches on either side will be your earflap stitches. Does that help at all?

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    2. It does! Thanks, Gretchen. I'm still unsure what you mean by transferring stitches to a scrap of yarn to work later. Sorry! I haven't followed a lot of patterns.

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    3. Ah hah! No worries! :) First, just cut a length of scrap yarn - maybe 18" - and thread it onto your tapestry needle (you can do shorter but then you might have to worry about your stitches falling off). Then just transfer each stitch from the needle to the needle, and then to the yarn, as if you're slipping the stitch purlwise. If you have difficulty with the fact that the stitches are on either side of the row marker, you can just transfer the first nine from the beginning of the hat and then put your needle on the other end of the scrap yarn and do the nine stitches from the other side of the marker! :)

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  28. I loved knitting this hat in Oceanix colour for my grandson, it's the first time I've ever attempted provisional cast on and used some you tube videos to learn how to do it. I'm almost finished but unsure of what blocking is, could you explain it to me please?

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    1. Hi!

      I'm so glad you enjoyed the pattern, and learned something new. :) As far as blocking goes - you know when you buy a sweater and it tells you to wash it and then shape it and lay it flat to dry? That's essentially what blocking is - getting your knitting wet (how you do this depends on the fiber; sometimes you simply spritz it with water, other times you dunk), and then laying it out, often pinning it in shape, to a towel or on blocking mats. The purpose of this is to "set the stitch," or, especially with things like lacy shawls, spread and set your lace so that it looks flat and pretty rather than shriveled up and messy.

      After all that explanation, however, I should say that I basically never block hats (I have made a few exceptions, but for the most part this is true), and I know I didn't block this one. Certain people would call this blasphemy, but I typically DON'T want to stretch out or reshape my hats, because then they lose some of the stretch. Of course there are 1,000 arguments for blocking hats as well. My best advice to you would be to google instructions for whatever type of yarn you used - for instance "blocking wool yarn" or "blocking a cotton/linen yarn" or whatever, read what you find, and decide what to do. Or do nothing! That's a choice too. :)

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  29. I am soooo happy to find this hat pattern! Earflap hats are the ONLY kind my Grand Niece & Nephew will wear! They cannot be convinced to wear any of their other sorts of hats, so since I'm in a hat knitting mood lately, it makes no sense to knit them any other kind.
    So I'll be using your lovely pattern for several hats -- including four adult, so their parents, GrandMa (my sister) & I all have similar ones!! All done in slightly different variegated colors. Acryllic, so they wash/dry quickly and easily.

    Given that I'm looking to make at least six hats, is there any possibility it's available as a downloadable, printable and/or pdf format somewhere, somehow??
    I find is so very much easier to follow a pattern offline, printed or offline up and down on whichever screen is closest. And for those waiting rooms with lousy internet connections, lol, where I do a LOT of my knitting!!

    Here's hoping.... However, regardless --
    Very well done, very nice, very practical and FUN pattern!!!

    Thank You!!

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    1. Hello there!

      Glad to hear you like the pattern! :) And you're in luck - if you just click the green "printfriendly" button at the bottom of the post you can format it for pdf (you can also delete elements, like pictures, if you want just the basic pattern). Then you should have what you need! And if you have any trouble with that just email me at ballstothewallsknits@gmail.com and I can help too. :)

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  30. Hi
    I'm in the uk, can I use 5mm circular needles 4ply DK yarn and small adult pattern to knit this gorgeous hat for my 5yearold granddaughter or does it not work like that..? Smaller needles thinner yarn bigger pattern?
    I am a very new beginner knitter and really want to make this hat
    Thank you so much

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Hi! Yes, that usually works as long as you continue to follow the length directions for the size you're making. :) If you give me your exact gauge I can also make a more precise recommendation!

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  31. Hi:
    This pattern looks great. I am wondering if I were to line the inside with flannel, what adjustments in size would you suggest for a large adult? Thank you!

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    1. Hi there!

      I don't believe that any size adjustments are necessary; the hat should easily stretch to accommodate some flannel. My only recommendation is that if you are going to use a non-stretchy material like flannel, though (rather than a stretchy one like a thin fleece), you will want to make sure that you cut your lining a bit bigger than your hat so that the whole thing still fits nicely when lightly stretched on the head! :)

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  32. How is this pattern adapted to knit for other family members? I wish to knit for ages 4, 7, mom and dad. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Hi there!

      I would do the child or the toddler size for the 4 year old, the child size for the 7 year old, and either the small or large adult for mom and dad, depending on head size! :)

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  33. Hi Gretchen! Thanks so much for the pattern :-) Am I the only one who cannot find the "print friendly" button :-(

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Hi there!

      It is between the photos and the comments and unfortunately it does not seem to show up if you're on a mobile version of the site... Otherwise it should be there! :)

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