Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Rose Briar Bag

Rose Briar Bag

I'll admit it; my reasons for designing this Rose Briar Bag are totally self-serving. Namely, I think it will make a nice holiday gift, when the time comes. Of course, it has other nice details as well, such as the triangular base (it's knit bottom-up) and the lace stripes. As pictured, it's also finished with a three needle bind off to attach the handles, although you're welcome to seam them instead.

Yarn: Lily Sugar 'n Cream (100% Cotton; 120 yards [109 meters]/70.9 grams); #01322 Lilac - 3 skeins

A closer look
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 7, and one set of double pointed needles, also in size US 7, size 10 or larger needles for provisional cast on, and one 24" circular needle in size US 7 (recommended but not required)

Notions: Tapestry needle, four stitch markers

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 7 needles

First and foremost, let's knit some handles! So, using your largest needles and a provisional cast on, cast on 11 stitches (if you plan to seam this bag rather than use the three needle bind off to attach the handles, you don't need to use a provisional cast on). Then switch to whichever set of size 7 needles you want to work back and forth on and knit the following set-up rows:

Set-up Rows 1 & 3 (wrong side): p11

Set-up Row 2: k11

And once those are done, let's go straight to the main handle pattern. The three slipped stitches on either side will serve to create i-cords as you work. Anyway, let's proceed as follows:

Handle Row 1: slip 3 with yarn in back (wyib), k5, slip 3 wyib

Handle Row 2: p3, k5, p3

Knit handle rows 1 & 2 until handle measures 10" and you've just finished row 2 of the pattern. Then we'll knit the following three rows:

Finish Rows 1 & 3: knit

Finish Row 2: purl

Knit these three rows and then transfer live stitches to scrap of yarn or stitch holder (to attach later in a three needle bind off - once again, if you don't plan to use one, go ahead and bind off regularly). Clip tail of yarn and make another handle in the same way.

And now that the handles are done, let's make the rest! As a note, we'll be working the bag part bottom up, so we'll begin on our dpns. Cast on 6 stitches, then, and place two stitches apiece on three needles. Join in round, and then we'll knit two set-up rows. Notice you'll be placing three stitch markers on row 2.

Set-up Row 1: knit

Set-up Row 2: (kfb, place marker, kfb) three times (+6 stitches)

And once your set-up rows are done, we'll move to our increase rows, which we'll knit until the bag reaches its full diameter. Remember to switch to your 16" circular needle once you have about 80 stitches on your needles (and to place your row marker, of course).

Increase Rows 1 - 2: (knit until you're one stitch before marker, yo, k1, slip marker, k1, yo, knit until end of needle) three times (+6 stitches with each repeat)

Increase Row 3: knit

Increase Row 4 - 5: repeat row 1

Knit increase rows 1 - 5 until you have 120 stitches on your needle and you've just knit row 3 of the pattern. Go ahead and remove your extra markers. Transfer work to your 24" circular needle, if desired. And now, it's time to begin our main pattern, for which we'll need the following notation:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

And now that that's out of the way, let's proceed as follows:

Row 1: * k1, yo, k2tog, k2, yo, ssk, k6, k2tog, yo, k2, ssk, yo, k1; rep from *

Row 2: * k1, yo, k2tog, k3, yo, ssk, k4, k2tog, yo, k3, ssk, yo, k1 *

Row 3: * k1, yo, k2tog, k4, yo, ssk, k2, k2tog, yo, k4, ssk, yo, k1 *

Row 4: * k1, yo, k2tog, k5, yo, ssk, k2tog, yo, k5, ssk, yo, k1 *

Row 5: * k1, yo, k2tog, k6, rt, k6, ssk, yo, k1 *

Row 6: * k1, yo, k2tog, k5, k2tog, (yo twice), ssk, k5, ssk, yo, k1 *

Row 7: * k1, yo, k2tog, k4, k2tog, yo, k1 in first yo, k1 through back loop in second yo , yo, ssk, k4, ssk, yo, k1 *

Row 8: * k1, yo, k2tog, k3, k2tog, yo, k4, yo, ssk, k3, ssk, yo, k1 *

Row 9: * k1, yo, k2tog, k2, k2tog, yo, k6, yo, ssk, k2, ssk, yo, k1 *

Row 10: * k1, yo, k2tog, k14, ssk, yo, k1 *

Knit rows 1 - 10 six times, and then we'll switch patterns for the top portion of the bag. So let's proceed as follows:

Finish Row 1: * k11, (p1, k1) 4 times, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times, k11, (p1, k1) 5 times, (k1, p1) 5 times *

Knit this finish row until this section of the pattern measures roughly 2". If you're seaming your bag, go ahead and bind off in pattern and then stitch handles in place above stockinette portions of bag - each handle should be attached so that the [(p1, k1) 4 times, p2, (k1, p1) 4 times] section of the pattern is between the two ends of the handle. If you're using the three needle bind off, go ahead and transfer the stitches from one end of one handle to a dpn. Using the three needle bind off and with right sides together, attach the first end of the first handle to the first 11 stitches of bag; then bind off regularly in pattern until you reach the next set of 11 stitches done in stockinette. Attach the other end of the first handle in the same way. Bind off regularly, in pattern, until your reach the next set of 11 stockinette stitches. Attach the first end of the second handle using the three needle bind off, and repeat the instructions to bind off to, and attach, the second end. Finally, finish binding off in pattern, tuck in ends, and block. And FINALLY finally, if you need more detailed instructions for the three needle bind off, check out the bottom of my post on the Chevron Market Bag. I took pretty pictures for that one and everything!!!







41 comments:

  1. Hey! Just found your blog. Lovely to find another freaky knitting addict
    such as myself!! lol. Great idea for the bag pattern and love how you've
    increased for the bottom. Super idea!
    Cheers, Anita.

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    1. Thanks Anita! First I made one top down, but it definitely seems like the bottom up approach gives a sturdier bottom. Glad to hear you like it :)

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  2. OOOO,....love the bag! Love the challenge. I'm going to try this to make shopping bags for friends that have to bring their own. This is gonna be soooo fun!!! :)

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  3. I love the excitement! :) And please, let me know if you have any questions.

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  4. Am I nuts ? Or, do I really see TWO Row 3s for the main part of the bag?

    Thanks.

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    1. Ha! No, you're not nuts, I numbered these rows incorrectly! The funny thing is that I know someone else has knit this bag too; they must not have noticed! I'll fix it. And thanks for letting me know :)

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  5. How do you knit this bottom up?

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    1. Hi! That's how the instructions are given, so you start with the handles, set those aside, and then cast 6 stitches on your dpns for the start of the bag. Gradually you make increases until the bottom reaches size, and then you stop making increases to make the bag portion. Does that answer your question? :)

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  6. I love this pattern! I am currently knitting it as a Christmas gift for someone, but I am a bit stuck! I don't understand on Row 7 when you say 'k1 in first yo' and then again 'k1 through back loop in second yo'. Could you explain?

    Thanks!
    Jess

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    1. Okay, I'm a derp! I figured it out....somehow I had missed the 2 yo's together on row 6, but now that I've got that I totally get it!

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    2. I'm glad you figured it out! Let me know if you have any other questions :)

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  7. I LOVE this bag and can't wait to start it! I'm just wondering if you know of a way that it can be adapted for magic loop rather than DPNs. I think I can figure most of it out, but I'm not sure how to adapt for the "knit until end of needle" on Increase rows 1 and 2. Obviously, if I'm using magic loop I won't have an "end of the needle." Do you know of a way that I could keep track of the number of stitches you reference? ANY help would be great! Thank you, thank you. I can't wait to try it.

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    1. Hi Jessica! I think the absolute easiest thing to do would be to place stitch markers where the ends of the dpns would be... then you'll know exactly where the "ends" are! And please let me know if you need any other ideas for this or have more questions :)

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  8. Thank you, Gretchen! I have learned so much from you and your blog/patterns. I'll give your suggestion a try (I'm just not so good with the calculations). :)

    I also wondered if I could pick your brain about something else. I want to knit Red Sox socks for my BF. Do you have any tips for knitting vertical stripes. I have been making your striped cowl, which I love, but I believe those are horizontal stripes. I LOVE that I'm not carrying the yarns along and stranding (HATE stranding). Any thoughts/suggestions/tips are greatly appreciated!

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  9. P.S. I have LOVED learning the slip stitch colorwork techniques from, and that's what I'm trying to apply to this project. Would I just slip however many MC stitches I want for the CC to show through on the next row/round? (I have no idea if I'm making any sense.) :)

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    1. Hi Jessica! Thanks so much for your kind words :) And yes, to make vertical stripes with a slipped stitch pattern in the round, you would basically just knit as follows:

      Row 1: using color A yarn, * k2, slip 2 with yarn in back *

      Row 2: using color B yarn, * slip 2 with yarn in back, k2 *

      You could also knit row 1 twice and then knit row 2 twice, if you wanted (and that's how you'd do it if you were knitting flat, so your ends wouldn't get left on the wrong side) (although of course if you were knitting flat you'd have to do purling on the wrong side, and slipping with the yarn in front) (really though, if you're sticking with the round I'd just knit them once).

      Big warning, though: slipped stitch patterns can be a lot less elastic than regular knitting, and you will need to be very careful to leave your yarn very loose behind your slipped stitches. Presumably you'll be using a yarn with a bit of elasticity if you're making socks, but the worst thing would be to knit them and then not be able to get them on because they don't stretch! Furthermore, slipped stitch patterns kind of "come apart" in a weird way if they're too tight, and look weird when stretched. Long story short, it's way harder to knit them too loose than too tight!

      Oh, and extra-finally, in my experience at least, vertical striped slipped stitch patterns end up looking a bit ripply. Just so you know.

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  10. What a great bag! I'm wondering the approximate finished dimensions? This may have to be my first attempt at something with handles! And I'll have to make one to give and one to keep. :)
    Thank you,
    Lisa

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    1. Hi Lisa!

      This bag is roughly 12" high and 24" in circumference. Please let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  11. This is a beautiful bag! I was just wondering where to insert the right twist in the pattern?

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    1. Hi Kimberly!

      The right twist is in row 5, where the little diamond shapes cross. And please, let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  12. Hi there! I made what I'm hoping is not a horrible mistake! In increase rows 1 - 5 (for the bottom) I knitted between rows 1 and 2 instead of increasing each time. UGH! Can I simply switch and start doing rows 1 and 2 correctly or do I need to FROG it?! Please, please, please say I can just do the switch over easily.

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    1. Hi Jessica!

      I am a big believer in fudging mistakes (I have finally conquered my inner perfectionist that way!), so your decision here will really depend on the look of what you've done so far. First off, how many rows have you knit? Besides that, like I said, it probably just depends on your preferences. Without the increase stitches the bottom of this bag may pucker a bit, something you may or may not be able to block away. So, if it looks too pucker-y for your tastes, you may want to frog. If you don't mind the look, or simply want to try to block it out later, then you can certainly just proceed! Let me know if you have any other questions. :)

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    2. Sigh. Just responded and it went away. Anyway, when you say "just proceed" do you mean as I have been or switching over to doing correctly. I say pucker be damned, I shall block thee and conquer. Plus, it's a customized design element. Ha! How about that?!

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    3. I mean switch over to doing it correctly, and then just keep going until you have 120 stitches as the pattern calls for. You may not be on row 3 of the pattern, but you're not, just knit a row around before you begin the main pattern! :) And yes, customized knits are where it's at!!!

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    4. Thank you! I love your patterns and have showed them to some folks who are equally impressed. I'll admit, I HATE DPN's so I converted to magic loop. Wish me luck!

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  13. beautiful! but how big is the finished bag? and did you come up with this pattern yourself? :D

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    1. Hi there!

      The bag ends up around 24" in circumference and 12" - 13" high. And yes, the pattern is all mine! :)

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  14. Instructions for bottom of bag....Inc rows 1-2, when I read it, it appears to be just one row (yo, k1, sl marker, etc.), row 3, knit, Inc rows 4-5. So it's really just one inc row and one knit row. Correct?

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    1. I don't quite follow your question, but increase rows 1, 2, 4, & 5 are all identical, and include increases, and row 3 is indeed just knit. Does that clear things up?

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  15. I love the bag and am looking forward to everything I will learn making it! I have a question on the directions for finishing the handles. I see 'finish rows 1 & 2' and wonder if this should read 'finish rows 1 & 3?'

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    1. Hi there!

      Yes, you are exactly right!!! I'll fix it, thanks for the tip! :)

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  16. I absolutely love the look of this bag, but I was wondering if you had any suggestions on how I might modify the pattern to put in a faux i-cord (like in your Funner Summer Beach Bag) for added stability. Maybe instead of the k1 yo k2tog/ssk yo k1 on either side of the zig-zag?

    Thanks for any advice and thanks again for the lovely patterns!

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    1. Hi there!

      So I've been poring over this pattern and I think the easiest place to add the faux i-cord would be in the middle of the k1 yo k2tog/ssk yo k1 - or in other words, the k1 at the very beginning of each pattern repeat and the k1 at the very end which get sandwiched together. That way you could begin 3 of the faux i-cords at the very beginning, when you're adding stitches to the bottom. And I realize that one usually does more than 2 stitches for a faux i-cord, but I think even 2 would be nice. And if you really wanted three, you could easily add one more stitch to at least the three sections which start in the bottom of the bag. Is that helpful at all? Am I making any sense? :)

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    2. Oh, that's a terrific idea! Thank you so much for the suggestion, I'm super excited to try it. I'll let you know how it works out!

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    3. Great! Let me know if you have any more questions. :)

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  17. Hi, wonserful bag, I'm in love with this pattern! I'm going to start it this evening...I hope to be able enough in translating. Thank so much for sharing. I've a question about finish handle rows: 1: knit; 2: purl; 3) knit. Am I right? And then I plan to proceed with three needle bind-off. Many many thanks and congrats for all

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    1. Yes, you are correct! I'm glad you like the bag, and please let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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    2. Many thanks for all. I finished it in July. So pretty, and two friends of mines asked me to make another one. WOW!!! I just made two little variations: an I-cord on the upper edge, and one long handle to wear on shoulders (am I right?). Then I lined the inside with cotton fabric. Many many thanks from Italy

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    3. That sounds fantastic! Glad you got such an enthusiastic response!!! :)

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  18. A question on the Finish Row....I am unsure about the very last stitching directions. Is this the repeating pattern to stitch for 2 inches......K11 (4x), P2 (4x), K11(5x), P5. Thank you for helping all of us make your cute bag!

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    1. Hi there! This finish row is just an uneven ribbing row so the first repeat of it is kind of a pain but then it's easy just to knit the knits and purl the purls after that. And written out fully it looks like this: Finish Row 1: * k11, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p2, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k11, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1 *

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