Showing posts with label kids' knits. Show all posts
Showing posts with label kids' knits. Show all posts

Thursday, April 27, 2017

A Is For Ascot

A is for Ascot
A is for Ascot - toddler size

Oh man, this is a project that I finished quite some time ago, but then I couldn't photograph and post it because my wild third child didn't want to get in front of the camera to model. And, of course, as soon as I FINALLY snapped these pics he also let me cut his hair, which makes him look like less of a goober than he does in these photos. However, his gooberness aside - this is a fun cowl/scarf project that's perfect for a kid who keeps losing his or her scarfs (since there's a slit in one end and the other end tucks in!). It will also, adorably, make your child look ever-so-slightly like a sailor. :)

Sizes: Toddler (Child)

Yarn: Lang Yarns Mille Colori Baby (100% Virgin Wool; 208 yards [190 meters]/50 grams); #0050 - one skein (one to two skeins)

A is for Ascot
Could I have put him in a less
colorful shirt? Probably, but then
he would have been screaming.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 4; one needle in size US 5 for provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

And now that we've gotten that taken care of, let's make an ascot! First, then, using your size 5 needle, cast on 40 (48) stitches provisionally. Transfer to 3 of your size 4 dpns, distributing the stitches as follows: 20 stitches on your first needle, 10 stitches on your second needle, and 10 on your third (24 on your first; 12 on your second, 12 on your third). Join in round. Knit in stockinette until piece measures roughly 6" (7"), at which point we'll knit one decrease row, as follows. Notice that the rows are different for the two different sizes.

Decrease Row - toddler size: [(ssk, k1) three times, k2, (k1, k2tog) three times] twice (28 stitches)

Decrease Row - child size: [(ssk, k1) three times, k6, (k1, k2tog) three times] twice (36 stitches)

Friday, December 9, 2016

Bump Up From Basics Beanie

Bump Up From Basics Beanie
Pictured in Child Size

Okay, I'm doing something a little bit different with this pattern, since I'm not offering it on my website, but through a video tutorial I created on Skillshare instead. Which means that, yes, I've had to face my fear of being on camera (don't worry, I deleted all the takes where I opened my eyes super-wide for no reason), and that this pattern is not technically "free" since it requires a membership on the website to access it. If you sign up through the link above, however, you can get 3 months on the website for $0.99, and access to tons of video content from all sorts of talented and amazing people (and I get some compensation as well!).

Oh, and as far as the actual pattern is concerned - I designed the Bump Up From Basics Beanie as a sort of next-level project for beginning knitters who've gotten comfortable with knitting and purling and are ready to move on to something more complicated. Or in other words, I demonstrate every technique you need to make this hat in the video except for knitting, purling, and tucking in your ends! :)

Anyway, here are the details:

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag

Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
pictured in size medium

I came up with the idea for this bag for a very simple reason: you can find this style EVERYWHERE in Switzerland. Seriously, what I remember (perhaps incorrectly) as a passing fad in the United States took deep roots in Swiss soil, much like the "Parental Advisory" branded clothing and hats that, while virtually extinct stateside, still roam the Swiss countryside like long-hunted wolves. Wait! What am I talking about? Oh yeah - the bag! They're everywhere here, and they're all the same size: adult. Which gave me the oh-so-clever idea to create a variety of kid sizes, since kids, without question, freakin' love bags. Oh, and if you love the look of this too, you're in luck, since the extra-large size is basically just adult. :)

Sizes: Small (Medium; Large; Extra-Large) (approximate finished dimensions: 6" wide by 7.5" tall [8" x 9.5"; 10" x 11.5", 12" x 13.5"])

Yarn: Patons Grace (100% Mercerized Cotton; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #62628 Fiesta - 2 skeins (2 skeins; 3 skeins; 3 - 4 skeins)

A closer view of the grommet
hole thingamabob. I know, I'm a poet.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 4, one 16" circular needle in size US 5, double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5 for making i-cords, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, 3 stitch markers

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's get this started! To begin this bag, then, we'll start by knitting the two drawstring-holding portions at the top separately and back-and-forth before joining them in the round (so the purled strips at the top that your straps lace through). With that in mind, and using your size US 4 needles, cast on 36 (48; 60; 72) stitches loosely. Then work the following rows:

Row 1 (right side): slip 1 stitch, purl until end of row

Row 2: slip 1 stitch, knit until end of row

Knit rows 1 & 2 five times and then knit row 1 once more (all sizes). Then, clip yarn tail and transfer work to your size US 5 circular needle to resume later. Again, using your size US 4 needles, cast on 36 (48; 60; 72) stitches loosely and work rows 1 & 2 five times and row 1 once more, although this time, when you finish, don't clip the tail. Transfer the work you've just finished to your size 5 needle, next to your other piece, making sure that the right sides (purl sides) are both oriented correctly, and that the piece you've just finished, with the running yarn connected, is lined up on the right-hand needle of your circulars so that you can continue work in the round. At that point, join in round, place row marker, and then knit one row around. Then we'll knit one transition/marker placement row, as follows. Since it's different for the different sizes, I have listed each size's row separately for ease.

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Inside Outside Hat

Inside Outside Hat
pictured in Child Large (I made it with lots of
room to grow for the kid!)

This hat was spawned with a variety of inspirations in mind; first and foremost, of course, I had to consider the yarn that my eldest son fell head-over-heels in love with at the store. And while I'm not usually a huge fan of a purled fabric, I do love the way it looks with a variegated fiber, which gave me the first clue about how to approach this hat. But since I didn't want it to be too basic, I also gave it the small detail of the knit stitches in the decrease to add that extra pop. All in all, I hope you'll appreciate this hat's pinwheel finish and sleek look, and super-appreciate the fact that it's also knit inside out, so you don't actually have to work all those purls!

Sizes: Toddler (Child Small; Child Large; Adult Small; Adult Large)

Yarn: Debbie Bliss Rialto DK Print (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 114 yards [105 meters]/50 grams); #47014  - two skeins (two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two - three skeins)

The pinwheel finish.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat, then! As I mentioned above, this hat will be knit inside out, so that the bulk of the work will be knitting rather than purling. With that in mind, then, and using your size US 5 needle, cast on 96 (100; 104; 112; 120) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, purl roughly 1" (1"; 1.5"; 1.5"; 1.5") and transfer work to your size US 6 circular needle. And now, knit until piece measures roughly 5" (5.5"; 6"; 6.5"; 7") from purled band.

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Rainbow Maze Hat

 
Rainbow Maze Hat
Rainbow Maze Hat
Size Toddler

The story behind this hat is simple: I've been hat-shamed for not sending my youngest to his preschool with a proper head-covering, so I decided to make one for him (to be fair, he's a very stubborn child, and has only recently been willing to wear one). And not only did the Rainbow Maze Hat turn out quite well, but he's also even worn it once or twice. Small victories, you know!

Sizes: 12 Months (Toddler; Child Small; Child Large; Adult Small; Adult Large)

Yarn: Lang Yarns Merino 150 (100% Virgin Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #197.0035 - one skein (one skein; one - two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two skeins) (color A), & Lang Yarns Mille Colori Baby (100% Virgin Wool; 208 yards [190 meters]/50 grams); #845.0050 - one skein (all sizes) (color B)

Rainbow Maze Hat
The pattern, and the back
Plus the baby's new jacket
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 3, one 16" circular needle in size US 4, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 3 circular needle and your color A yarn, then, cast on 114 (120; 126; 132; 144; 156) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll move to our ribbing, which goes as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 3.5" (3.5"; 3.5"; 4"; 4"; 4"). Transfer work to your size US 4 circular needle, and then we'll knit two transition rows as follows:

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Little Tent Hat

Little Tent Hat

I'm paying the piper with this pattern - and, by "the piper," I mean my eldest son, who has learned that he only needs to bat his sweet little eyes at the yarn store to get almost any fiber he wants (I draw the line at novelty). So, he picked the yarn, and then we picked the pattern together; something whimsical and fun, but that would suit both children and adults. Speaking of which, I've designed this hat in four sizes, which should cover everyone from about 18 months to adult (because - scarily enough - there really isn't that much of a difference in head size). If you need any additional guidance choosing a size, just let me know in the comments! :)

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 128 Superwash (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 128 yards [117 meters]/100 grams); #1952 Blaze - one skein plus a little scrap white for the pompom (oh, and if you're making the adult large hat, you may need 2 skeins to complete the pompom)

A closer view of the little tents
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

And now that we know what we're working with, let's get started! Using your size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 60 (66; 72; 78) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some ribbing to get started, as follows:

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Build-Your-Own DK Weight Hat

Build-Your-Own DK Weight Hat

I designed this pattern with one goal in mind; namely, that it could be the first in-the-round project for a beginning knitter who had learned how to knit and purl but not much else. Or in other words, it's supposed to be a tutorial. Of course, you don't have to be a beginning knitter to enjoy it - with a basic design like this, there's all sorts of customization you can add. Throw in stripes or a stitch pattern with a 2-, 4-, or 8-stitch repeat, and you can turn this basic little hat into another beast entirely! Or, add a few inches and omit the knit rows in the decrease and you'll have a gathered crown. And add a few extra inches to THAT and it's slouchy as well!!!!

Oh, and another thing, guys - this is my first tutorial style pattern. So if I seem to be missing an instruction, please let me know! We can make it perfect together. :)

Sizes: 12 Months (Toddler; Child; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult) 

A closer view of the crown.
Yarn: Malabrigo Rastita (100% Merino Wool; 310 yards [285 meters]/100 grams); #850 Archangel - one skein (all sizes)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5; one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles 

Let's make a hat, shall we? First, a note about the sizing. As with virtually any sized knitting pattern, I will give directions in the same order as the sizes appear above. If you're making an adult small, for instance, you'll always use the direction second from the end of the line (or in other words, you'll be casting on 112 stitches here in a moment). My only tip with this direction is that it can be useful to print your pattern and highlight the correct sizes if you're knitting something with a lot of them - otherwise, the numbers can run together. So go ahead and do that if need be. And, once you're done, it's time to get down to business!

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Little Red Hooded Cowl

Little Red Hooded Cowl
Size 4 - 6, on a giant-headed 4-year-old

So here's the thing. I made the Baby Bear Hooded Cowl for my six-year-old, and then my four-year-old demanded a similar hat of his own. And while many elements of the two designs are the same (I made them with the same weight yarn and same basic premise), the Little Red Hooded Cowl adds a cute little cable, just for fun. That same cable also makes it fit a tad snugger than the Baby Bear Hooded Cowl, which also gives it a slightly different look.

Note: As of 1/14/17, I've corrected the cast on number for the large adult. :)

Sizes: Toddler (Ages 4 - 6; Ages 7 - 12; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky (75% Acrylic, 22% Wool, 3% Rayon; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #999  - one skein (two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two skeins)

A closer look at the cable.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

So let's get started! Using your 16" size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 64 (68; 72; 76; 80) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: p3, k6, p2, * k2, p2; rep from * until you have 13 stitches left in round, then k2, p2, k6, p3

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Baby Bear Hooded Cowl

Baby Bear Hooded Cowl
Size 7 - 12 (so it will fit more snugly on a larger child)

I think we've probably all seen some version of this hat, what with the ears, the hood, and the cute kid poking out and all. So here, by request, let me present my version: the Baby Bear Hooded Cowl, which knits up quickly on size US 10 needles and with chunky weight yarn. Of course, it's not just kids who deserve to look this cute, so I've also sized the thing from toddler to adult. Make one for your husband! He'll love it, I promise (note: my promise does not constitute a legal, binding agreement. In fact, make one for your husband at your own peril. Seriously.)!

Sizes: Toddler (Ages 4 - 6; Ages 7 - 12; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky Tweed (75% Acrylic, 22% Wool, 3% Rayon; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #T599 Brown - one skein (two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two skeins)

A closer look at the face hole.
Filled by one of the cutest little faces.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size 10, and one 24" circular needle in size US 10 if you're knitting size 7 - 12 or larger

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

So let's get started! Using your 16" size 10 circular needle, then, cast on 64 (68; 72; 76; 80) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following edging rows:

Edging Rows 1 - 3: purl

And once those bad boys are done, knit 2" (3.5"; 5"; 7"; 9") in stockinette. Switch to your size 9 needle, and we'll do a few ribbing rows before we move on to the hood, like so:

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Cute & Cabled Baby Bib

Cute & Cabled Baby Bib

I have had this yarn in my stash for an embarrassingly long time - I bought it over a year ago with the intention of turning it into a cowl, and then promptly forgot about it. When I ran across it at the end of a hectic week, however, I realized that it would be perfect for a quick-knitting project like this one. So I conceived of the Cute & Cabled Baby Bib, which is thick, cute, detailed but not too difficult to knit, and works up in a snap. Also, I'm pretty sure you could get two bibs out of one skein, although I haven't tried it (yet).

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Jeannee Chunky (51% Cotton, 49% Acrylic; 106 yards [97 meters]/100 grams); #10 Blue - one skein

A close-up of the side detail.
After a long debate, I used
decreases for shaping
instead of short rows.
Needles: One set of straight needles in size US 10 and two double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10, for working the i-cord ties

Notions: Tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches 

So let's make a bib! First of all, then, using your size 10 needles, cast on 29 stitches loosely. Then, we'll knit the following two set-up rows: 

Set-up Row 1 (wrong side): knit

Set-up Row 2: p9, place marker, p11, place marker, purl until end of row 

And once those rows are done, it's time to begin our pattern, which includes some shaping and also a strip of "Opening" Double Cable from page 113 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. At any rate, we'll be continuing like so:

Row 1 (wrong side): purl until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, p7, k2, slip marker, purl until end of row

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Bricklayer's Lace Baby Blanket

Bricklayer's Lace Baby Blanket

The story behind this project is simple: I've reached the age where my friends are starting to have babies, so I've started to knit baby blankets. Therefore, as soon as I knew a friend was pregnant, I began looking for the right fiber at my local yarn store. And I passed this one by for months and months before I finally saw it knit up, and loved the way the stitches looked like rain drops. So I brought it home and found this lovely stitch pattern, which shows off both the yarn and the pattern. And it's a quick knit, since it's chunky and all!

Yarn: James C. Brett Flutterby (100% Supersoft Polyester; 192 yards [175 meters]/100 grams); #B3 Blue - 3 skeins

The pattern. For all the bricklaying
babies out there.

Needles: 32" or longer circular needle in size US 10

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 11 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Okay dudes, are you ready to make a baby blanket? Then let's get started! First, cast on 96 stitches loosely. And then we'll knit the following set-up rows:

Set-up Row 1 (wrong side): knit

Set-up Row 2: knit

Set-up Row 3: knit

Set-up Row 4: knit

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Minky Mittens

Minky Mittens

I've been plotting another pair of mittens for awhile now. In fact, I've been plotting them for so long that I didn't manage to complete them until our first spring-ish week here in Wisconsin (oops). While my timing is terrible, however, these mittens are not; made with a slip stitch color pattern, they are thick and warm, and can be sized from toddlers to adults. Now I just have to hope my kids don't grow out of them before next winter...

Sizes: Toddler (Child Small; Child Medium; Child Large/Adult Small; Adult Medium; Adult Large)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #1946 Silver Grey - one skein (color A), #810 Teal - one skein (color B for the toddler sized mittens) & #9863 Spring Meadow - one skein (color B for the children's small mittens)

The pattern. Plus an eye! Notice how the variegated color B
yarn changes the look of the mitten.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's do this thang! Using your size 5 needles and your color A yarn, cast on 30 (34; 36; 40; 44; 48) stitches and divide evenly between 3 dpns. Join in round. Then knit the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures 1.5" (1.5"; 1.75"; 2.25"; 2.25"; 2.5"). Then switch to your size 7 needles and knit one row around, still in your color A yarn. And once that's done, we'll work a few more rows before we gusset in the thumb, as follows:

Saturday, January 10, 2015

Double Pom Earflap Hat

Double Pom Earflap Hat

As I've mentioned before, every once in a while, one of my children decides that they need something new and then pesters me until I make it for them. Such was the case with this hat. My three-year-old has a friend with a double pompom hat; hence, he needed one too. Luckily, he is less picky than my five-year-old, and let me pick the stitch pattern. And this two-color design looks fantastic in person and adapts perfectly to the round. Oh, and did I mention that I've sized this hat to fit everyone from toddler to adult as well???*

* I've also updated the marker placement rows of this pattern as of January 14, 2016 (they were missing a marker!).

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Cascade 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #809 Really Red – one skein (color A) and #871 White - one skein (color B) (all sizes)

The pattern. It's a winner!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 7, one set of double-pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7 (for working the i-cords), one US 9 or larger needle for provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker, stitch holders or scrap of yarn for holding stitches

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 7 needles

So let's get started! Using your large needle, your color A yarn and a provisional cast on, cast on 90 (96; 102; 108) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Transfer work to your 16" size 7 circular needle and knit four rows around. Switch to your color B yarn and knit one row around. And now, it's time to begin our pattern, which is Cage Pattern from page 65 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Row 1: using your color A yarn, * slip 2 with yarn in back (wyib), k4; rep from * 

Row 2: using your color A yarn, * slip 2 wyib, p4 *

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Fantastic Welted Cowl

Fantastic Welted Cowl

Sometimes, all you need is a simple cowl with a lot of texture. And if that's what you're looking for, the Fantastic Welted Cowl fits the bill, with both a ripple effect and purled accents. Furthermore, though I've pictured the child size, you can also make it for an adult or a toddler. So cute!

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Adult)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Jeannee (55% Cotton, 45% Acrylic; 111 yards [101 meters]/50 grams); #08 - 1 skein (2 skeins ; 2 skeins)

A better picture of the pattern
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 8, 16" circular needle in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches

So let's do this! First, using your size 7 needle, cast on 77 (88; 99) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit a few edging rows, as follows:

Edging Row: * (k1, p1) twice, k3, (p1, k1) twice; rep from *

Knit edging row 4 (4; 6) times, and then switch to your size 8 needle. Next, we'll move on to our main pattern, which is Welting Fantastic from page 143 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. And it goes as follows:

Rows 1, 3, & 5: purl

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Butterfly Stitch Cowl

Butterfly Stitch Cowl

Okay, I'll own it: a linen blend yarn isn't particularly winter-y, and I should probably stick to super cold-weather yarns now that the temperature has dropped. Luckily for me, though, this pattern makes such a robust and supple fabric that the yarn's fiber mix hardly seems to matter. And it's not just the Butterfly Stitch Cowl's yarn that's versatile, either, it's also the sizing. In fact, I've provided a version for everyone 2 and older. Hello mommy-daughter matching time!

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Adult)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Linen Concerto (48% Rayon, 42% Linen, 10% Cotton; 101 yards [92 meters]/50 grams); #01 Cream - 2 skeins (2 - 3 skeins, depending on length; 3 skeins)

A better look at the pattern
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! First, cast on 100 (110; 120) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit five set-up rows, as follows:

Set-up Rows 1 - 4: purl

Set-up Row 5: knit

And now let's move on to the main pattern, which is Butterfly Stitch from page 101 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. Before we get to that, however, let's define our butterfly stitch as follows:

bs (butterfly stitch) (yes this abbreviation makes me happy): slip 1 stitch purlwise (this stitch should be the middle stitch above your five slipped bars), then insert right-hand needle down behind 5 bars and pull them up, then insert left-hand needle up behind the 5 bars (which will orient them knitwise). Finally, slip middle stitch back to left-hand needle and knit all 5 bars and middle stitch together

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Rib & Welt Baby Blanket

Rib & Welt Baby Blanket


It's embarrassing to admit, but I'll do it anyway; I started knitting this blanket very shortly after my six month old baby was born, and I only just finished it yesterday. Of course, that doesn't mean that I don't dig the pattern or anything - I do!!! It's reversible and everything!!! It is not, however, as quick of a knit as I'm used to, since it's basically a 26" wide x 29" high rectangle made out of sport weight yarn. That being said, if you're going to make a baby blanket, the Rib & Welt Baby Blanket is a pretty good option. It's strikingly graphic, and did I mention the whole reversible thing? Plus, the pattern is very easy to learn, and babies look super cute on it.

Yarn: Patons Beehive Baby Sport (70% Acrylic, 30% Nylon; 304 yards [278 meters]/85 grams); #11142 Little Boy - three skeins

The pattern
Needles: 24" or longer circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! First, then, cast on 174 stitches loosely. Then knit 1" in a * k1, p1 * ribbing. On your last row like this, place one stitch marker 10 stitches from the beginning of the row, another 82 stitches from the beginning, another 92 stitches from the beginning, and the final marker 10 stitches from the end of the row. And then let's proceed as follows in the main pattern, which incorporates two panels of Rib and Welt Diagonals from page 9 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. Like so, then:

Row 1: * k1, p1 * until you reach first marker, slip marker, then; * k1, p1, k1, p5; rep from * until you reach second marker. Slip marker, * k1, p1 * until third marker, slip marker, and then; * k1, p1, k1, p5 * until you reach final marker; slip marker, * k1, p1 * to end

Row 2 and all even rows: knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches, slipping all markers when you come to them

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

All in the Family Earflap Hat

All in the Family Earflap Hat
Child Size

Although I've made hats of many other silhouettes, a reader recently reminded me that I had yet to post an earflap. And this reminder instantly reminded me of yet another thing - namely, that the last time I made an earflap hat, I had far fewer knitting techniques in my toolbox, and ended up having to cobble together a hat, some flaps, and some weird cast-ons with a crocheted edging, to hide the mess. Now that I've progressed, however, I designed this All in the Family Earflap Hat with a basic but rather elegant design that uses a provisional cast on for a seamless, nicely finished look. Plus, it doesn't require any crocheted hoo-ha for the edging (although of course you're welcome to crochet as much hoo-ha as you like; no judgment here). Also, as a note, I should mention that, though I very much enjoyed this yarn, I found the gauge recommendations to be WAY off. Thusly (and especially with a basic stockinette hat such as this), I highly recommend that you check your gauge before accidentally knitting a hat that would fit the Jolly Green Giant better than your kid.

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Small Adult; Large Adult) (in measurements, and roughly, the toddler size should fit an 18" - 19" inch head, the child a 19.5" - 21" inch head, the small adult up to a 21" head, and the large adult up to a 23" head)

Yarn: Berroco Ultra Alpaca (50% Alpaca, 50% Wool; 215 yards [198 meters]/100 grams); #6288 Blueberry Mix - 1 skein

From the side.
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 8, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 8, and one 10 or 10 1/2 needle for the provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 16 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! Using your largest needle and a provisional cast on, cast on 70 (77; 77; 84) stitches. Then, transfer stitches to your size 8 circular needle, place marker, and join in round. Knit until piece measures about 5.5" (6"; 7.5"; 8"), and then we'll begin the decreases, as follows. Remember to switch to your dpns once you're down to about 60 stitches.

Decrease Row 1: * k5, k2tog; rep from *

Decrease Row 2: knit

Decrease Row 3: * k4, k2tog *

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Kids' Banana Beanie

Kids' Banana Beanie

The baby is 6 months old now, so I figured it was high time he made his debut. And what better way to do it than sporting a chunky weight baby hat that can be sized all the way up to 12 years (he's wearing the 9 month size, though - I just couldn't bring myself to knit something he would outgrow immediately)? Anyway, there's not really much else to say about this piece, except for the fact that it's a quick and easy knit, and that its subtle pattern is oh-so-cute.

Sizes: 6 months (9 months; 12 months; up to 3 years; up to 12 years) (to be clearer on sizes: the 6 month will fit up to a 16" head, the 9 month a 17" head, the 12 month an 18" head, the 3 year a 19" head, and the 12 year up to a 21" head)

Yarn: Berroco Vintage Chunky (50% Acrylic, 40% Wool, 10% Nylon; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #6122 Banana - 1 skein, plus roughly 10 yards of contrasting color, if desired for pompom

A better shot of the pattern,
And the pom pom.
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles

So let's get started! First, as a side note, I knit this entire hat with my size 10 needles. However, you could cast on and knit the first five-ish rows with a size 9, if you desired, for a bit of extra snugness at the bottom of the hat. And now that the note is out of the way - using the 16" circular needle of your desired gauge, cast on 52 (56; 60; 64; 68) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit one set-up row, like so:

Set-up Row: * k3, p1; rep from *

And once that's done, let's move straight to our main pattern, which goes as follows:

Row 1: * k1, p1 *

Rows 2 & 4: * k1, slip 1 with yarn in back, k1, p1 *

Row 3: * k3, p1 *

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Sunny Stripes Hat

Sunny Stripes Hat
... plus a very wiggly child...

Sometimes, I feel as if I'm trapped in an endless hat knitting cycle with my children; as soon as I finish a hat for one of them, the other one immediately gets jealous and demands yet another hat. Which is how the Sunny Stripes Hat came to be, in all of its stripe-y glory. And it's not just the stripes that make it fun; it's also the slip stitch accentuated finish, which make it look almost like the celestial body it's named for. Plus, it comes in all sizes, so you can knit one for every member of your family (pets excluded)!

Sizes: Small (Medium; Large) (Small is 7.5" from crown to bottom, and will fit up to a 20" circumference head - think pre-schooler to young elementary, unless the kid's got a huge noggin like my children; Medium is 8.5" from crown to bottom, and will fit up to a 22" circumference head - think older kid to teen to smaller-headed adult (this would be my size); and Large is 9.5" from crown to bottom, and will fit up to a 24" circumference head - perfect for my husband)
The finishing. Slipped stitches
give it an extra sunny feel.

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #8906 Blue Topaz - one skein (color A), Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Heathers (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #2439 Gelato - one skein (color B)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 7, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches

Before we begin, a quick note about sizing; as you may have noticed, I recommend medium for anyone between, like, 5 and adult. This is simply because most head growth occurs in the first couple of years, and, for instance, my five-year-old's head is only 1" smaller than mine in circumference and 1/2" smaller than mine crown-to-base-of-ear. Which means, yes, we would both wear the medium. Of course, not everyone's children have such monstrous heads, and the small size could fit a much older child. Finally, if you're knitting this hat as a gift and have no idea about sizing, I recommend large for most men, medium for most women and teens, and small for most everyone between 2 and 8 or so. Go up a size if they seem large-headed, or add 1/2" to 1" to the length. And now that we're all thoroughly confused, let's get started!

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Kids' Reversible Cocoon Hat

Kids' Reversible Cocoon Hat - right side

My five-year-old picked out this yarn ages ago, and has been bugging me to make something with it ever since. And after rejecting my first two designs (what can I say? the kid knows what he wants!), this fun hat finally passed muster. Even better, the wrong side of the design is just as charming as the right side, so the child you knit it for can wear it either way!

Kids' Reversible Cocoon Hat - wrong side
Sizes: Ages 18 months - 3 years (Ages 4 - 6; Ages 7 - 10)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Fingering (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 273 yards [250 meters]/50 grams); #9430 Forest Green - one skein

Needles: 16" circular needle in size 3, one set of double pointed needles, also in size 3

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 28 stitches = 4 inches

So let's do this thang! First, using your circular needle, cast on 128 (144; 144) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit 1" (1.75"; 1.25") in a k1, p1 ribbing. And then we'll get right to the main pattern, which is Cocoon Stitch from page 131 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. As you can see, there is no difference in pattern between the three sizes. And here we go!