Showing posts with label #5. Show all posts
Showing posts with label #5. Show all posts

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Nikki's Slouch Hat

Nikki's Slouch Hat
Nikki's Slouch Hat
pictured in size Adult Small/Medium

Here's another pretty hat with a simple story: my friend Nikki was struggling to find a nice slouch hat here in Switzerland. Meanwhile, I had just bought some lovely yarns at my local store knowing that they would be *perfect* for something. And what do you know, a few conversations and copious swatching later, Nikki's Slouch Hat was born! With a combination of cabled panels (for squish) and simple striping (for ease), this hat has texture and charm galore!!!

Sizes: Adult Small/Medium (Adult Medium/Large)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Landlust Merino 120 (100% Virgin Wool; 131 yards [120 meters]/50 grams); #105 Taupe - one skein (two skeins) (color A), & #116 Petrol - one skein (both sizes) (color B) (side note: I didn't have a full 10% of my color A skein left over when I finished this hat, so I suppose it's possible that you'll need two skeins to finish the small size too. If you get in that situation, however, I suggest you fudge it and finish with color B, especially if you're gonna add a pompom!)

Nikki's Slouch Hat
A look at the back.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one 16" circular needle in size US 11, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 11, and one cable needle (cn) or extra dpn for cabling (or cable without a cable needle, if you like!)

Notions: tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size US 4 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 10.5 needle and your color A yarn, then, cast on 76 stitches (80 stitches) loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work in a basic ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures roughly 2" (2.5"-3"), and then transfer work to your size US 11 circular needle. Then, we'll work the following transition row. Notice the row is different for the two different sizes.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Susan's Scarf

Susan's Scarf
Susan's Scarf

I doubt many of you realize this, but what this scarf represents is actually a tiny miracle; namely, it's the second piece of a hat/scarf set that I designed to go together for the first time, EVER!!! (if you're interested, you can find Susan's Slouch Hat here) But of course you don't have to be interested in the set to enjoy this pattern, partially because, while I made it with only 2 skeins of yarn (roughly 250 yards), as long as you cast on an odd number of stitches and have a rough idea of your gauge, you can make it any size you like! That also means that this pattern is easy to adapt for different gauges of yarn - and please, feel free to hit me up in the comments if you need any extra help!!!

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Pure Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #063 Natural - two to three skeins 

Susan's Scarf
A closer look.
Needles: One 40" or longer circular needle in size US 10, one 40" or longer circular needle in size US 10.5, one 5 or 6 mm crochet hook, 2 lengths of scrap yarn measuring roughly 6' apiece

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 10.5 needles

So let's make a scarf, then! Using your size US 10 circular needle, cast on 189 stitches loosely. Then, we'll work some ribbing, as follows, for the edge of the scarf:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): slip 1 stitch with yarn in front (sl1 wyif), * k1, p1; rep from * until end of round

Ribbing Row 2: sl1 with yarn in back (sl1 wyib), * k1, p1 *

Work ribbing until piece measures between roughly 2.25" and 2.5" and you've just finished a wrong side row (of course this part of the pattern is also adaptable - if you have the yarn and want to make it wider, go to town!). Then, we'll add a bunch of stitches that we'll later use to work the band that runs between the ribbing and the stockinette. Once we add them, we'll simply hold them all on a piece of scrap yarn on the right side of the scarf. So, to that end, work these two transition rows:

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Susan's Slouch Hat

Susan's Slouch Hat
(even though Hedwig is wearing it)

As you can probably guess from the name in the title, this hat was designed with a specific person in mind. And in fact, I've been meaning to knit this person something for some time, but it wasn't until autumn descended and I saw her seasonal red jacket that I realized EXACTLY what she needed (to be fair, she also told me she wanted something in the white/natural color family and tried to get knitting tips before I stole the project right out from under her and told her I'd come up with something instead). What was I saying? Oh right, Susan's Slouch Hat will be your go-to head covering since it knits up quickly in chunky weight yarn and has a simple but elegant design. (Oh, and let's keep our fingers crossed that it becomes Susan's go-to head covering as well, or the whole thing is a monumental failure!)

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Pure Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #063 Natural - one skein

A close-up of the detail that takes this hat from
blah to boo-yah (yeah, nobody says that)!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 8, one 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one 5 or 6 mm crochet hook, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 10.5, scrap yarn measuring roughly 24"

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 10.5 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 8 circular needle, then, cast on 72 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from * until end of round

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Ruched Mitts

Ruched Mitts
Ruched Mitts

I'm not exactly sure where to start with these guys, mostly because I don't actually want to start. After all, if I begin this post, I'm going to have to explain that my recent absence was due to repetitive stress issues with my forearms, that I'm doing much better now, thank you very much, and that I will probably be relaxing my regular posting schedule so that I can continue to do well.

And heck, since I don't want to go through all that, let's not - let's talk about these mitts instead! And the first thing I should mention in that realm is that I bought this yarn because I thought it would make an easy project - it's bulky weight, for goodness sake, and not even variegated! Unfortunately, I was wrong since it turns out that this particular fiber is one of those strong core/big halo types (you know what I mean, right? - there's a thick center and then lots of fuzz?). And those types of yarn are very pattern resistant, since lace knitting isn't well-defined in them and even cables look messy. Which is how I finally stumbled across the ruched design, which uses some well-placed eyelets and a scrap yarn i-cord to create some interest. So let's get started!

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7.5" - 8.5" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium up to 9.5", and the large goes up to about 10.5")

Yarn: Schachenmayr Fashion Nordic Dream (57% Viscose, 35% Wool, 8% Polyamide; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #00002 Natur Mélange - one skein (color A) & Malabrigo Worsted (100% Merino Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #12 Very Berry – roughly 20 yards (color B)

Ruched Mitts
A better look at the ruching.
My five-year-old likes it.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 16 stitches = 4 inches

Which brings us to the mitts! To begin, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 28 (32; 36) stitches loosely and distribute between 3 dpns as follows: 8 stitches on first needle, 12 stitches second needle, 8 stitches on third needle [(10; 12; 10); (12; 12; 12)]. Join in round. Then we'll move straight to our main pattern, as follows:

Rows 1 - 6: knit

Row 7: knit across first needle; k2, [k2tog, (yo) twice, ssk] twice, k2 from second needle; knit across third

Row 8: knit, working a (k1, p1) into each double yo 

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Banded Cable Beanie

Banded Cable Beanie

Sometimes a good hat needs no introduction. Or at least that's what I'm telling myself today because, quite frankly, I don't feel like writing one. Nevertheless, I will tell you that this hat works up quickly and reasonably easily for a cabled number and is suitable for the larger-headed amongst us (as well as the smaller-headed, although it won't be overly snug). It's also pretty snappy looking, if I do say so myself.

Yarn: Berroco Vintage Chunky (52% Acrylic, 40% Wool, 8% Nylon; 136 yards [125 meters]/100 grams); #6146 Azure - one skein

A better look at the decrease.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles (dpn), also in size US 10, and a cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat! Using your size 9 needle, then, cast on 75 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work our ribbing as follows:

Ribbing Row: * (k1, p1) twice, k1; rep from *

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Rickrack Braid Hat

Rickrack Braid Hat

The first thing I should mention (before I forget to) is that I designed this hat to match the 81-Yard Cowl. However, I didn't want to go too matchy-matchy, so the hat uses a stripe of stockinette that's two stitches wide rather than the cowl's single stitch. Nevertheless, if made in the same yarn these two items would make for a handsome pair. And an economical one, since this hat uses almost the same yardage as the cowl!!!

Yarn: Schachenmayr smc Boston (70% Acrylic, 30% Virgin Wool; 60 yards [55 meters]/50 grams); #72 Pine - two skeins (I know I just said this hat uses the same yardage as the cowl - that's 'cause I didn't use all of my two skeins!!)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one set of double pointed needles, also in size US 10.5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 64 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row 1: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *