Thursday, December 14, 2017

Frost on the Windowpane Shawl

Frost on the Windowpane Shawl
Frost on the Windowpane Shawl

To introduce the shawl, I think it's best to start at the beginning: it's a rainy, blustery day, the place is rural Romania, and the year is 1988. Okay, okay, maybe the origins of this piece aren't quite that dramatic... the truth is, I got the idea for the Frost on the Windowpane Shawl while attending a shawl shaping class with Chrissie Day at the Loch Ness Knit Fest in Inverness this last October, when she mentioned a concept called sequence knitting. And while I am no sequence knitting expert (if you want one, you should check out the definitive book by Cecelia Campochiaro), I understood enough of the basics to want to give it a shot.

Okay, first then - what is sequence knitting? As I have a very basic understanding, I again refer you to the book. What you need to know in order to make this piece, however, is that instead of using a multi-row stitch pattern, in which you line up your current work with your work from the previous row, you will simply be repeating the same combination of stitches over and over again to create the pattern on the non-stockinette portion of the shawl. Of course, since there are also increases and that stockinette stripe to deal with, it's perhaps easier to think of knitting this shawl using a few algorithms, or rules. I realize that that might sound complicated right now, but I hope you'll realize that it's easy and fun once you get started. Another bonus is that this shawl uses an almost identical amount of your color A and B yarns, so you can knit without waste (which I personally find terribly enjoyable).

Oh, and as a final note - you'll notice that I played pretty fast and loose with the gauge on this puppy. Almost any lighter-weight yarn will work; since it's just an increasing triangle shawl, you have a lot of freedom with your yarn choice!

Also, this shawl pattern was featured on AllFreeKnitting's collection of 11 Elegant Knit Triangle Shawl Patterns. :)

Finished Dimensions: roughly 56" along the stockinette stripe, 45" along the top, and 64" along the diagonal

Yarn: Skein Queen Linger (75% Superwash Merino, 25% Nylon; 465 yards [425 meters]/100 grams); Sea Holly - one skein (color A) and My Happy Place - one skein (color B)

Frost on the Windowpane Shawl
A closer look at the details.
Needles: One 24" or longer circular needle in size US 5, and one US 4 needle for icord bind off (optional)

Notions: tapestry needle, one stitch marker

Gauge: 36 stitches = 4 inches on size US 1/2 needles, 20 stitches = 4 inches on size US 5 needles

So let's make a shawl, then! And I know I said some stuff about sequence knitting before, but we will begin with the stockinette portion of this shawl, so don't worry about that stuff for now. Using your color A yarn, then, cast on 8 stitches loosely and then go immediately to some beginning rows, as follows. As you'll notice, there are faux icord edgings on both sides of the shawl; leave those loose, especially the one at the beginning of your wrong side rows, in order to get the best stretch on your shawl when you block it. Anyway, let's continue like so:

Beginning Row 1 (wrong side): using color A, slip 3 stitches with yarn in front (sl3), purl until you have 3 stitches left in row, sl3

Beginning Row 2: using color B, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, (yo) twice, k3 (+2 stitches)

Beginning Row 3: using color B, sl3, (k1, p1) in double yo, purl until you have 3 stitches left in row, sl3
Beginning Row 4: using color A, knit

Knit beginning rows 1 - 4 until you have 32 stitches on your needle and you've just finished row 1. Then we'll knit the following two transition rows:

Transition Row 1 (right side): using color B, k29, place marker, (yo) twice, k3 (+2 stitches)

Transition Row 2: using color B, sl3, (k1, p1) in double yo, slip marker, p26, sl3

Once you've knit these two rows, we'll begin our sequence knitting. And I'm going to help you with this in two ways: first, I'll outline all of the rules for the pattern. Then, I'll give you written out instructions for your first twenty-some rows, which demonstrate those rules in action. As you'll notice, I have included the sequence knitting stitches from each row in parentheses after the row, in bold. As I said, I hope this will help demonstrate the rules in action.

Rules

1. This pattern is worked in two-row stripes; you will work two rows in color A, and then two rows in color B. (you've already been using this rule!)

2. There is a three stitch faux icord at either side of the pattern; this means that the three stitches at the beginning and end of a right side row are always knit, and the three stitches at the beginning and end of a wrong side row are always slipped with yarn in front. (this one too!)

3. All increases are worked on a color B right side row as a double yarn over that occurs three stitches from the end of the row. (and this one!!!)

4. When you encounter this double yarn over on the wrong side, you will always work a (k1, p1) into it. (again, you've been doing this)

5. On a right side row, you will knit every stitch between the beginning of the row and your marker. (this too!)

6. On a wrong side row, you will purl every stitch between your marker and the end of your row (except the final three faux icord stitches). (yup; so far, 6/7 of the rules are things you've already been doing!)

and finally,

7. This is the 24-stitch, single-row pattern that you will repeat over and over again in all other areas: k8, p8, (yo, ssk) four times. You will always work a complete iteration of this pattern, even if it requires several rows to finish (as it will, in the beginning). (To be explicit - areas to use this include: on a right side row, between your marker and the faux icord at the end of the row, and, on a wrong side row, between the faux icord at the beginning of the row and the marker, not including the double yos in color A rows, which have a (k1, p1) worked in them)). And this, wonderful readers, is the ONLY NEW RULE YOU HAVE TO FOLLOW! :)

So, in case I've confused the heck out of you at this point, here are those rows I promised to write out to help you get started. Again, notice that I've included the sequence stitches at the end, in parentheses, to help you keep track. And let me know in the comments if you have any questions!

Getting Started Row 1: using color A, k29, slip marker, k5 (k2)

Getting Started Row 2: using color A, sl3, k2, slip marker, p26, sl3 (k2)

Getting Started Row 3: using color B, k29, slip marker, k2, (yo) twice, k3 (+2 stitches) (k2)

Getting Started Row 4: using color B, sl3, (k1, p1) in double yo, k2, slip marker, p26, sl3 (k2)

Getting Started Row 5: using color A, k29, slip marker, p4, k3 (p4)

Getting Started Row 6: using color A, sl3, p4, slip marker, p26, sl3 (p4)

Getting Started Row 7: using color B, k29, slip marker, (yo, ssk) twice, (yo) twice, k3 (+2 stitches) ([yo, ssk] twice)

Getting Started Row 8: using color B, sl3, (k1, p1) in double yo, (yo, ssk) twice, slip marker, p26, sl3 ([yo, ssk] twice)

Getting Started Row 9: using color A, k29, slip marker, k9 (k6)

Getting Started Row 10: using color A, sl3, k2, p4, slip marker, p26, sl3 (k2, p4)

Getting Started Row 11: using color B, k29, slip marker, p4, yo, ssk, (+2 stitches) (p4, yo, ssk)

Getting Started Row 12: using color B, sl3, (k1, p1) in double yo, (yo, ssk) three times, slip marker, p26, sl3 ([yo, ssk] 3 times)

Getting Started Row 13: using color A, k29, slip marker, k11 (k8)

Getting Started Row 14: using color A, sl3, p8, slip marker, p26, sl3 (p8)

Getting Started Row 15: using color B, k29, slip marker, (yo, ssk) four times, (yo) twice, k3 (+2 stitches) ([yo, ssk] 4 times)

Getting Started Row 16: using color B, sl3, (k1, p1) in double yo, k8, slip marker, p26, sl3 (k8)

Getting Started Row 17: using color A, k29, slip marker, p8, yo, ssk, k3 (p8, yo, ssk)

Getting Started Row 18: using color A, sl3, (yo, ssk) three times, k4, slip marker, p26, sl3 ([yo, ssk] three times, k4)

Getting Started Row 19: using color B, k29, slip marker, k4, p6, (yo) twice, k3 (+2 stitches) (k4, p6)

Getting Started Row 20: using color B, sl3, (k1, p1) in double yo, p2, (yo, ssk) four times, slip marker, p26, sl3 (p2, [yo, ssk] four times)

Getting Started Row 21: using color A, k29, slip marker, k8, p4, k3 (k8, p4)

Getting Started Row 22: using color A, sl3, p4, (yo, ssk) four times, slip marker, p26, sl3 (p4 [yo, ssk] four times)

Work these rules, and the rows that result from them, until shawl measures desired length and you've just finished a wrong side row, (or until you're getting low on yarn, but not out - you'll need a few ounces for your icord bind off!). Then, work a single striped i-cord bind off, as follows:

I-cord bind off: using whichever color you'd like to start with, cable cast on 3 stitches. Then, using your other color, * k2, k2tog (this k2tog will include the last three of your i-cord stitches and one stitch from the body of your shawl); slip stitches purlwise back from your right-hand needle to your left hand needle; rep from *, switching colors with each row that you work. If you'd prefer a video, you can find it here too:


Complete i-cord bind off, tuck in ends, and block. Gift or wear proudly!

Frost on the Windowpane Shawl
Frost on the Windowpane Shawl
Frost on the Windowpane Shawl
Frost on the Windowpane Shawl
Frost on the Windowpane Shawl
Frost on the Windowpane Shawl

4 comments:

  1. Thanks for this lovely pattern. I love the contrast in textures!

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    Replies
    1. I'm so glad you like it! I love the textured aspect of it too, although I know it won't be everyone's cup of tea... Anyway, if you decide to make it let me know if you have any questions!!! :)

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  2. This looks beautiful - and I love to find reversible shawls that use more than one colour! My question is about the shape - there is no photo or diagram to show the final shape or which direction it is knit. Can you just keep knitting as long as you like? Thx!

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    Replies
    1. Hi there!

      Yeah, I didn't have any space to photograph it well in my house all laid out, apologies! I did post a (terrible) photo of the shape in its Ravelry comments, though, here: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/frost-on-the-windowpane-shawl/comments

      Long story short, though, it's just a triangle and you start at the end that's striped stockinette and work larger, so you can indeed just make it as long as you'd like to! :) And let me know if you have any other questions!!!

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