Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Build-Your-Own DK Weight Hat

Build-Your-Own DK Weight Hat

I designed this pattern with one goal in mind; namely, that it could be the first in-the-round project for a beginning knitter who had learned how to knit and purl but not much else. Or in other words, it's supposed to be a tutorial. Of course, you don't have to be a beginning knitter to enjoy it - with a basic design like this, there's all sorts of customization you can add. Throw in stripes or a stitch pattern with a 2-, 4-, or 8-stitch repeat, and you can turn this basic little hat into another beast entirely! Or, add a few inches and omit the knit rows in the decrease and you'll have a gathered crown. And add a few extra inches to THAT and it's slouchy as well!!!!

Oh, and another thing, guys - this is my first tutorial style pattern. So if I seem to be missing an instruction, please let me know! We can make it perfect together. :)

Sizes: 12 Months (Toddler; Child; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult) 

A closer view of the crown.
Yarn: Malabrigo Rastita (100% Merino Wool; 310 yards [285 meters]/100 grams); #850 Archangel - one skein (all sizes)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5; one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles 

Let's make a hat, shall we? First, a note about the sizing. As with virtually any sized knitting pattern, I will give directions in the same order as the sizes appear above. If you're making an adult small, for instance, you'll always use the direction second from the end of the line (or in other words, you'll be casting on 112 stitches here in a moment). My only tip with this direction is that it can be useful to print your pattern and highlight the correct sizes if you're knitting something with a lot of them - otherwise, the numbers can run together. So go ahead and do that if need be. And, once you're done, it's time to get down to business!

So, using your size 5 circular needle, cast on 88 (96; 104; 112; 120) stitches using a long tail cast on, place marker, and join in round (so, to be totally clear on the sizing, 12 month = 88 stitch cast on, toddler = 96 stitch cast on, child = 104 stitch cast on, adult small = 112 stitch cast on, adult large = 120 stitch cast on). Questions about either of these steps? Never fear. Here's a guide to the long tail cast on:


And here's some info regarding joining your piece in the round:


Anyway, once you've gotten your cast on done and your knitting joined in the round, we're going to make some ribbing, which you'll find below. If you're new to knitting patterns, this is also very standard terminology. Your row will be named or numbered, and then you'll get instructions in one of two ways: without *'s, and with a specific instruction for each stitch, or with *'s, which indicate that the instruction between the *'s should be repeated over and over until you reach the end of your row or round. Here, we're using rounds, since we're knitting in a circle, and we're repeating instructions, because I don't dislike you enough to give you a pattern without any repeats. :) So we'll continue like so:

Ribbing Row: * k2, p2; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures 3" (3.5"; 4"; 4.5"; 5"). Since I'm making the small adult size, this step looks like this for me:

See? 4.5", on the dot!
Now that your ribbing is complete and you're back at the beginning of your round, transfer your work to your size 6 circular needle. This is done by simply slipping each stitch purlwise from the left hand needle of your size 5 circular to your right hand needle of your size 6 circular. What's purlwise, you ask? When you insert your needle as if to purl, or in other words, right-to-left through your stitch. Once your work is transferred, knit until piece measures 6.25" (6.75"; 7.25"; 8.25"; 9") in total. 

And now I'm at 8.25"!
At this point, it's time to begin the crown decreases, which you'll find below. In order to get smaller at the crown, this hat uses two decreases, the knit 2 together (k2tog) and the slip, slip, knit (ssk). The k2tog is a right-leaning two-to-one decrease that is made exactly as it sounds, by knitting two stitches together instead of just knitting one. The ssk is a left-leaning two-to-one decrease that more or less mirrors the k2tog. You can find a video demonstrating it below.


Now that we're up to speed on how to make our k2togs and ssks, let's discuss the crown decreases for this pattern. As you may have noticed, each size of this pattern is 8 stitches larger than the size before it (so the adult large has 8 more stitches than the adult small, which has 8 more stitches than the child, etc). I have also written the decrease to reduce the hat by 8 stitches each row. Therefore, the adult large will contain the same number of stitches as the adult small after your first decrease row. Long story short(ish), this means that you will be beginning the decreases on a different row for each size - if you're making the child size, obviously you can skip the four decrease rows that contain more stitches than your hat ever had. So, with that in mind, when you start your decrease, you'll begin on Decrease Row 9 (Decrease Row 7; Decrease Row 5; Decrease Row 3; Decrease Row 1). Furthermore, we're going to switch to our dpns after Decrease Row 8 (you'll find more directions below). If you're making the 12 month size, you'll notice that this happens before you even knit your first decrease row. But enough talking - let's begin our decreases below.

Decrease Row 1: * k13, k2tog, ssk, k13; rep from * (112 stitches) (size adult large only)

Decrease Row 2: knit (size adult large only)

Decrease Row 3: * k12, k2tog, ssk, k12; rep from * (104 stitches) (sizes adult large and adult small only)

Decrease Row 4: knit (sizes adult large and adult small only)

Decrease Row 5: * k11, k2tog, ssk, k11; rep from * (96 stitches) (sizes adult large, adult small, and child only)

Decrease Row 6: knit (sizes adult large, adult small, and child only)

Decrease Row 7: * k10, k2tog, ssk, k10; rep from * (88 stitches) (sizes adult large, adult small, child, and toddler only)

Decrease Row 8: knit (sizes adult large, adult small, child, and toddler only)

No matter which size you're knitting, you're going to want to transfer your work to your size 6 double pointed needles at this point. I made a really cool video for the transfer part, but my husband had his thumb over the audio so it sounded like I was shouting from underwater and I could only recover the second half of the video. To summarize what you missed, then, here's what I said: dpns come in packages of five, and you can knit using either three or four needles to hold your work. I think using three is slightly easier, but for a hat like this, which decreases in four places, four needles makes more sense. In the future, when you're knitting a new pattern, you'll probably want to look at said pattern in order to figure out whether it's best to use 3 or 4.

Since we're working on this pattern, though, we're going to transfer our work to four dpns, with 22 stitches on each needle (all sizes). If you need a refresher in dpn knitting, you can watch the second half of said video, below. And yes, I'm well aware that I shouldn't be allowed anywhere NEAR a video camera. I tried to get my six year old to sub in for me, but he just staged a mini sword fight with the needles.


Anyway, the decrease will continue like so for all sizes:

Decrease Row 9: * k9, k2tog, ssk, k9; rep from * (80 stitches)

Decrease Row 10: knit

Decrease Row 11: * k8, k2tog, ssk, k8; rep from * (72 stitches)

Decrease Row 12: knit

Decrease Row 13: * k7, k2tog, ssk, k7; rep from * (64 stitches)

Decrease Row 14: knit

Decrease Row 15: * k6, k2tog, ssk, k6; rep from * (56 stitches)

Decrease Row 16: knit

Decrease Row 17: * k5, k2tog, ssk, k5; rep from * (48 stitches)

Decrease Row 18: knit

Decrease Row 19: * k4, k2tog, ssk, k4; rep from * (40 stitches)

Decrease Row 20: knit

Decrease Row 21: * k3, k2tog, ssk, k3; rep from * (32 stitches)

Decrease Row 22: knit

Decrease Row 23: * k2, k2tog, ssk, k2; rep from * (24 stitches)

Decrease Row 24: knit

Decrease Row 25: * k1, k2tog, ssk, k1; rep from * (16 stitches)

Decrease Row 26: * k2tog, ssk; rep from * (8 stitches)

Knit decrease rows 9 - 26 (7 - 26; 5 - 26; 3 - 26; 1 - 26). At this point, you should have 8 stitches left on your dpns. Clip your yarn tail, leaving a roughly 18" tail, and thread that tail on to your tapestry needle. 

I'm beginning to thread, see?
Thread the tail through your remaining 8 stitches and pull tight. Thread to inside of hat and knot. Tuck in ends and wear proudly because you, sir or madam, just made a hat! :)

Oh, and before I forget - there are definitely people who would recommend blocking your hat before you wear it. I am not one of those people. And it's not because I don't block - I do - I just don't block most hats. I know, I'm the worst.






48 comments:

  1. I love this hat! Do you think I could use Rios Malabrigo yarn instead? I have a skein I don't know what to do with!!

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    1. Hi there!

      Yes, you absolutely can, but you'll have to change your cast on number and fiddle with the decrease a bit, since it's worsted weight instead of dk. What size do you want to make?

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    2. I'd like to make small adult size!

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    3. At 20 stitches per 4 inches you can cast on 104 stitches instead of 112, and then follow the length directions for the adult small, but start the decrease on the row of the child size. Let me know if that doesn't make sense! :)

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    4. Thank you Gretchen! Yes it makes sense. I appreciate it! Can't wait to start. My problem is I have too many things I want to knit and I'm not the fastest knitter quite yet :)

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    5. I totally understand. :) Just let me know if you have any other questions!

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    6. Do you need to adjust the size of the needles with worsted weight or still using 5 and 6's?

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    7. Yup, use the needle you need to get gauge to knit the bulk of the hat, and a needle one size smaller for the ribbing. :)

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  2. I am on Dial-Up Internet...slowest thing ever!! Sooo slow, in fact, that I am unable to watch any UTube tutorials, because of the buffering...would take 3+ hours to watch a 3 minute clip!!! Could you explain how to do the ssk, please? Thank you in advance... By the way, LOVE your blog/site!!

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    1. Oh my goodness, you poor thing! :) I remember dial-up, and not fondly! Anyway, there are plenty of descriptions and tutorials out there. Here's one I like: http://knitting.about.com/od/knittingglossary/g/slip-slip-knit.htm

      And in case clicking through takes a millennium, here is the main description of the stitch from that page. :)

      "To execute this decrease, slip the first stitch as if to knit, slip the second stitch as if to knit, then slide the left-hand needle into the front part of both stitches and knit them together."

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  3. Umm if you cast of 112,you will be ending in 2 knit not 2 purl so it will acually be knitting 4 in a row. If I cast on 2 more it will throw the decrease off. Can you help me on the decrease if i cast on 114 please?
    Cindy

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    1. Hi Cindy!

      Since the ribbing for this hat is a * k2, p2 *, which has a four-stitch repeat, and 112 is divisible by 4, you should have a seamless * k2, p2 * ribbing all around the hat. I can certainly help if you'd prefer to cast on 114 stitches, but you will end up with a bit of a funkier decrease since 114 is only divisible by 2 and 57. This means you'll have unevenly spaced decrease lines. Let me know if that's what you'd like to do and I can help you with some modifications! :)

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  4. Ok this time i was so careful co 112 and paid close attentionto what i was doing and it worked perfectly. I ended up with 2 purls. I am so sorry i bothered you with a problem that was my fault. Thank you for taking the time to reply. Btw I love your hats and will keep making them.

    Cindy

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    1. Hi Cindy!

      No worries; I once yelled at a guy at the bank for a long time before I realized that my problem was my own fault (and then I was horribly embarrassed for days). Anyway, it happens. Let me know if you have any other issues or questions! :)

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  5. I am making the adult large....my first project znd I am working on the first decrease and after doing the row I am left with 106 stitches. O actually do the k2tog,ssk 5 times on this row. I must be doing something wrong.?

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    1. Hi there!

      Yes, it does sound like something is going awry. :) My best guess is that you are missing the second k13 from the pattern directions in one of your repeats somewhere - since the first decrease row reads * k13, k2tog, ssk, k13; rep from *, you will actually end up having 26 knit stitches together between all of your groups of k2tog, ssk decreases, even though the k13's don't seem to appear together at first. Anyway, like I said, that's just a guess. Let me know if that's not the problem and I'll take another stab at helping! :)

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  6. As a new knitter, I am really enjoying using your pattern here. I do have a decrease question. I'm making the child size (104 stitches) and in your comments you say to begin that decrease on row 9 but you also mention in Decrease row 5 that it is for child size. I'm confused as to which row to start on. Thanks in advance for your help.

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    1. Hi there! Glad you're liking the pattern. And correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm guessing that it's this line that tripped you up: "So, with that in mind, when you start your decrease, you'll begin on Decrease Row 9 (Decrease Row 7; Decrease Row 5; Decrease Row 3; Decrease Row 1)." Since you're making the child size, you will begin on decrease row 5, as you stated above in your comment. My guess is that it just wasn't super clear that this direction contained different information for different sizes. :) Anyway, if that's not what happened and there's another place in the pattern that confused you, please let me know! I am aiming for clear directions, after all! And either way - yes, you'll begin on decrease row 5. :)

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  7. Hi Gretchen, my sister and i have a wool shop in Devon, we like to get involved in community projects. The local high school are collecting all sorts of items for a shoe box appeal included knitted items. We are a collection point I am currently knitting a toddler had with some stash yarn to donate. I just wondered if it would be possible to put a link to your pattern on our website and Facebook page as a suggestion for what people could knit for the boxes? Completely understand if this is not ok! Thank You Tori

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    1. Hi Tori!

      Thanks for the question! And you're in luck - I definitely encourage sharing! Thanks for getting in touch and let me know if you have any other questions!!!

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    2. That is fabulous, thank you I will get on in it in the morning

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  8. Could this be knit with a sport weight yarn?
    Thanks

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    1. Hi there!

      Yes, it absolutely could! Let me know which size you'd like to make and I'll suggest some modifications for you! :)

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    2. Hi Gretchen
      I would like to make a woman's size. Thanks so much Robin

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    3. Gretchen I really don't want the ribbing to fold over. Is there a way to adjust this too? Thanks


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    4. Hi again!

      Okay, so I'm assuming a gauge of 24-25 stitches per 4 inches (which is in the sport range, probably using the larger of the needles suggested on the yarn package). So using your smaller 16" circular needle (probably a size US 3 or 4) you can go ahead and cast on 136 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Follow the directions for the ribbing, but only knit between 2" and 2.5" in ribbing instead of the 4.5" given - that way it won't roll over (and I only give you the range so you can decide how you like the look - you can stop any time you feel done since the next instruction is for total length and not based on ribbing size). So, once you're happy with your ribbing, transfer work to your gauge needle (probably a US 4 or 5), and knit in stockinette until hat measures 6" in total. Then, you'll begin your crown decreases. Since you have more stitches than the largest size of the hat I've given above, you'll need to start with these decrease rows:

      Supplemental Decrease Row 1: * k15, k2tog, ssk, k15; rep from * (128 stitches)

      Supplemental Decrease Row 2: knit

      Supplemental Decrease Row 3: * k14, k2tog, ssk, k14; rep from * (120 stitches)

      Supplemental Decrease Row 4: knit

      Knit these four decrease rows and then begin the instructions for the size large hat given above - that should take you to the end! And please, let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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    5. Hi Gretchen I completed the hat but it's a little too large. I think maybe my tention is loose. I used a size 3 needle. Should I go down a size?

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    6. Hi Robin!

      First off, I'm sorry to hear it's a bit too large! I know this makes me a lazy person, but that's one reason I don't knit too many stockinette hats - the gauge really matters! :) That being said, yes, I would just go down one size - you can always swatch first if you're worried, but, again, as a lazy person I would probably just go for it. Anyway, good luck!!!

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    7. Do you have another hat pattern that I could knit with this sport weight yarn

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    8. Probably! What gauge are you getting?

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    9. Well from one lazy person to another... I don't know I didn't do a swatch.....

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    10. Ha! Okay, when I read that I actually laughed! Anyway, I looked back through some of my patterns and I think the two best for indeterminate sport-weight gauge are the XOXO Beanie (http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/2016/01/xoxo-beanie.html) and the Twilight Rose Beanie (http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/2016/05/twilight-rose-beanie.html), since they both have stretch built into the patterns. Oh, and the Sweetheart Beanie (http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/2014/05/sweetheart-beanie.html) might also be a good choice!

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    11. Thank you. I will give one of these a try.

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    12. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  9. I have to make the man's hat with head does not petite. I advice the small adult or large adult? I would like to adhering to overhead. Use yarn DK.
    Grazie mille

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    1. But are 275 yards 50 grammi.

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    2. Hi! If your gauge matches mine, I suggest the adult large. :) I also definitely suggest double-checking gauge before you start since your yarn might be a bit heavier than mine, based on weight and yardage!

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  10. I don't know if you remember me but I made this hat and showed you the pic. Well I wear it to work alot and a few of my Co workers loved it so much but don't knit asked me to make them hats like mine. I have made several of the and just gave them away for free to my friends at work and gave you credit for the design. I hope that's ok. I sent them a link to the website .

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  11. P.S. this is my all time favorite hat to make. Thank you so much for sharing your amazing patterns and ideas. I am very greatful.

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    1. Hi Cindy!

      First off, of course I am happy that you made hats for your friends at work!!! :) Share the love, that's what I say! And I'm glad to hear that they are all so well-loved. I'm happy I could be a part of it. :)

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  12. Paula HarringtonMay 10, 2017 at 5:10 PM

    I plan on using this for a color work hat that the design is a little to large for worsted weight. I just have a question. Why did you slip all the stitches on to the bigger needle instead of knitting it onto the bigger needle?

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    1. Personally, I think that slipping them first makes that row of stitches look *ever so slightly* better but you are welcome to knit it on the bigger needle instead! :)

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  13. Is there a way to print this pattern without all the pictures etc. I just need the pattern.

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    1. Yes, just use the PrintFriendly button at the bottom of the pattern (and above the comments). It will allow you to remove photos, etc, before printing - just be aware that the button only loads when the website is not in mobile view!!! :)

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