Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Cherry Blossom Cowl

Cherry Blossom Cowl

Holy moly. It's been a bit of a stressful morning; not only was the baby unwilling to eat or sleep, but he also spent an hour or two screaming nonstop. Finally, after carrying him around and trying to make him happy all morning, I needed some lunch, so I heated up some pizza. And despite the fact that he had rejected cereal, strawberries, and a squish bag full of baby food, he went DOWNTOWN on the pizza, and now he's happy as a clam. Clearly, he needs to learn how to talk.

And speaking of talking, I should say a word about this piece! First, the name - it's a late spring here in Wisconsin, and the cherry trees are spreading those delightful, pale pink blossoms that I love so much. The color of this cowl and the bobbles reminded me of them. And yes, you're right - it is my first time knitting bobbles! Turns out it's not so hard. So if you haven't done it before, this lovely, lightweight piece is a great place to start!

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Sateen (100% Acrylic; 300.7 yards [275 meters]/100 grams); #7 Ballerina Pink - one skein

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

Anyway, let's get started! First, then, we'll cast on 152 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. As a note, this piece will be fitting pretty close to the head (my finished piece is about 20" in circumference, unstretched). And while I have no trouble getting it over my 22" noggin, you may want to cast on a few extra stitches if you have a larger head. Just let me know if you need help modifying the pattern! Anyway, let's continue. It's time to knit the following set-up row, to get started:

Set-up Row: p21, place marker, p110, place marker, purl until end of round

And once this bad boy is out of the way, it's time to begin on our main pattern, which incorporates a large section of Field of Wheat from page 278 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns and some decreases, since I am obsessed with a nicely-shaped cowl. Anyway, to continue, you'll need the following notation:

mb (make bobble): (k1, yo, k1, yo, k1) in one stitch, which will turn one stitch into five; turn and k5; turn and p5; turn and k1, slip 1-k2tog-psso, k1; turn and p3tog, which completes bobble. When you reach this stitch again on the following row, knit through the back loop of the bobble stitch rather than the front loop. 

And now that that's out of the way, let's get knitting!

Row 1: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * k1, mb, k2, yo, k1, yo, k4, k2tog; rep from * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round

Rows 2, 4, 6, 8, & 10: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, * k10, k2tog * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 3: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * k5, yo, k1, yo, k3, k2tog * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round

Row 5: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * k6, yo, k1, yo, k2, k2tog * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round

Row 7: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * k7, (yo, k1) twice, k2tog * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round

Row 9: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * k8, yo, k1, yo, k2tog * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round

Row 11: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * ssk, k4, yo, k1, yo, k2, mb, k1 * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round

Rows 12, 14, 16, 18, & 20: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, * ssk, k10 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 13: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * ssk, k3, yo, k1, yo, k5 * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round

Row 15: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * ssk, k2, yo, k1, yo, k6 * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round  

Row 17: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * ssk, (k1, yo) twice, k7 * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round   

Row 19: knit until you have two stitches before first marker, k2tog, slip marker, * ssk, yo, k1, yo, k8 * until you reach next marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until end of round    

Knit rows 1 - 20 twice, at which point you should have only one stitch between your row marker and your first stitch marker (and your row marker and your second stitch marker). Remove extra stitch markers. Now that we're done decreasing, we'll continue in the same pattern as before, except without the decreases (I am the master of the obvious!). So, in case you'd like it restated, we'll continue like so:

Row 1: k1, * k1, mb, k2, yo, k1, yo, k4, k2tog; rep from * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Rows 2, 4, 6, 8, & 10: k1, * k10, k2tog * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Row 3: k1, * k5, yo, k1, yo, k3, k2tog * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Row 5: k1, * k6, yo, k1, yo, k2, k2tog * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Row 7: k1, * k7, (yo, k1) twice, k2tog * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Row 9: k1, * k8, yo, k1, yo, k2tog * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Row 11: k1, * ssk, k4, yo, k1, yo, k2, mb, k1 * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Rows 12, 14, 16, 18, & 20: k1, * ssk, k10 * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Row 13: k1, * ssk, k3, yo, k1, yo, k5 * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Row 15: k1, * ssk, k2, yo, k1, yo, k6 * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Row 17: k1, * ssk, (k1, yo) twice, k7 * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Row 19: k1, * ssk, yo, k1, yo, k8 * until you're one stitch before end of round, k1

Knit rows 1 - 20 once, and then knit rows 1 & 2 once more. Bind off loosely, remembering that this thing is going to fit pretty close to your head, and you'd REALLY like to be able to get it on (so really, try to bind off loosely!). Tuck in ends and block.






37 comments:

  1. My boys are in their thirties now, but I remember those days! Who knew pizza was baby food? Well, stands to reason, I guess. It's nature's perfect food :)

    Lovely pattern, by the way. Thank you! I'm up to my elbows in baby sweaters right now (three great nieces due this summer!), but next time I get a chance to knit for me, I'm making this one!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, he mostly just likes the crust with the sauce! He's kind of a strange baby, though - he also loves meat. Anyway, glad to hear you like the pattern. And congrats on all the great nieces! :)

      Delete
  2. Such a lovely design! Reminds me of the cherry blossoms here in D.C.!

    I would have never thought of pizza as baby food either - but so glad you thought of it!! Probably not as glad as you - LOL!

    Linda in VA

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I hadn't thought of it that way either until he started to eat it! I guess he just has a more refined palate now that he's one. :) Anyway, glad you like the pattern. We had more cherry blossoms in Washington state, where I grew up, but I saw some just the other day and smiled.

      Delete
  3. I remember those days when bubs wouldn't settle. It can drive you
    around the bend, especially because they can't talk. It will pass.
    Thanks for the pattern, it's yummy.
    Cheers, Anita.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Anita! And yeah, it can be tough when they want something but you just can't figure out what it is! Luckily the baby is usually a little bundle of joy, so I really can't complain. :)

      Delete
  4. I love your patterns! They are always unique, classy and well written with excellent pictures to show how the end result looks. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a lovely compliment - thank you! That's exactly what I aim for, so I'm glad to hear it. :)

      Delete
  5. Lovely pattern! By how many should I increase to get a larger circumference? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello!

      Glad you like the pattern. :) The stitch pattern itself uses 11 stitches per repeat, so you can add multiples of 11 to make it bigger. Just be aware, though - I do have that stockinette section in the back, and if you make it really big, you might want to skip it. In that case, simply cast on a multiple of 11 and follow the pattern instructions after I say "So, in case you'd like it restated, we'll continue like so:", except omitting the first and last k1s (the ones outside of the * markers). That will get rid of the shaping! :)

      Delete
  6. OMG ,Gretchen this is even prettier than the sea and shore cowl pattern,pleaaaaaase could I have a pattern for a scarf to look like this instead ,it would look awesome you come up with pretty ones and this one is very different ,clever lady xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would just settle for this one instead of the sea and shore one ,this is so nice to knit for myself and a friend of mine :-)

      Delete
    2. Hi Kim!

      Absolutely, I can help you with this. I have only one question - do you want any edging? Oops, no, I have one more question too. Are you planning to use the same gauge yarn, or something different? How many stitches per four inches?

      Delete
    3. Ohhh how exciting Gretchen Thankyou very much Hun, how ever easier it is for you to do I'm just grateful your doing this for me, I'm not sure how to write the yarns,here in Australia either 4 or 8 ply

      Delete
  7. Sorry I had to say about the size ,I usually knit my scarf about 18 centimetres wide ,usually taking up 40 stitches across that width I think :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kim!

      Personally, I think this scarf would look best without any edging, since the stitch pattern is so pretty. So here's what I would do, given your 40 stitch estimate:

      Using whichever size needles you usually use to get your gauge, cast on 44 stitches loosely. Then, we'll go immediately to the pattern, as follows:

      Row 1 (right side): * k1, mb, k2, yo, k1, yo, k4, k2tog; rep from *
      Rows 2, 4, 6, 8, & 10: * p2tog, p10 *
      Row 3: * k5, yo, k1, yo, k3, k2tog *
      Row 5: * k6, yo, k1, yo, k2, k2tog *
      Row 7: * k7, (yo, k1) twice, k2tog *
      Row 9: * k8, yo, k1, yo, k2tog *
      Row 11: * ssk, k4, yo, k1, yo, k2, mb, k1 *
      Rows 12, 14, 16, 18, & 20: * p10, p2tog-tbl (purl 2 together through back loops) *
      Row 13: * ssk, k3, yo, k1, yo, k5 *
      Row 15: * ssk, k2, yo, k1, yo, k6 *
      Row 17: * ssk, (k1, yo) twice, k7 *
      Row 19: * ssk, yo, k1, yo, k8 *

      Knit rows 1 - 20 until desired length is reached and you've just finished row 2 of the pattern. Bind off loosely, tuck in ends, and block. :)

      And please, let me know if you have any more questions!

      Delete
  8. Thankyou so much Gretchen for doing that for me your wonderful, does mb mean make bobble :-) ,thanks again when I get it knitted I shall send a picture :-) hugs

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup, I just used the same notation from the pattern. And I'll keep an eye out for the pic. You can email it to me or post in on my Facebook page! :)

      Delete
  9. I love the cowl but don't love bobbles. Can this pattern be made without them and without disturbing the lace pattern?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, totally! Just k1 instead of making the bobble. :)

      Delete
    2. Awesome - thank you for all you do for knitters everywhere. :^)

      Delete
    3. Awesome - thank you for all you do for knitters everywhere. :^)

      Delete
    4. Happy to help. :) And please, let me know if you have any other questions!

      Delete
  10. I cannot thank you enough for your hard work and generosity in sharing this pattern. A dear friend asked me for a cowl to cover up a scar from a recent surgery on her neck and she lives in the DC area. Instantly I thought, CHERRY BLOSSOMS!! After much time scouring the web I came across this and cast on!! I love it when the stars align!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perfect! I hope she loves it!!! Let me know if you have any questions. :)

      Delete
  11. Thanks for the pattern. I'm going to try it. I'm a fairly new knitter and am wondering what stitch or pattern to use for checking gauge.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there! I give all my gauges in stockinette unless otherwise stated. And please, let me know if you have any other questions! :)

      Delete
    2. Thanks so much and for your quick reponse. Just bought my yarn. Good to know you're available for questions. More could be coming.

      Delete
    3. Yup, I'm around! Happy knitting!!! :)

      Delete
  12. Cascade Sateen is no longer available in any good colors. Can you tell me if the cowl takes all of the 300 yards? I would like to try the cowl in a different yarn. Thanks,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi there! I'm sad to hear that all the good colors are gone... I liked this yarn reasonably well! :) Anyway, this cowl did not take all 300 yards, although I can't remember how far off it was. On the plus side, you can always just quit if you run out of yarn, although you'd probably best off with 200 yards+.

      Delete
    2. Thank you for your reply Gretchen. It's a beautiful pattern.

      Delete
    3. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

      Delete
  13. Hi, I love this pattern, but I'm on my 3rd time trying it and my buds are off center and I'm lost on the 7th row. Things are not lining up. So it's a 11 stitch repeat? Can you explain that? So sorry, I.ve knitted for years, but am lost here but so determined. Thank you!!
    Deborah Connecticut US

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Deborah!

      First of all; yes, it is an 11 stitch repeat! And I'm looking at it and trying to figure out what would throw you off about row 7 and nothing useful is coming to mind... since row 5 was k6 before your yo, k1, yo, and row 7 is a k7 before the yo, k1, k1, they should line up. Is it possible you missed the k2tog instructions in row 6? When you begin row 7 you should have 110 stitches between your markers (although you will have 120 after it since you do half of your decreases on the even rows). Anyway, I'm not sure if that's helpful or not, but if you can give me any more information, or email me a picture of the problem at ballstothewallsknits@gmail.com, I can try to do more! :)

      Delete
  14. Cute pattern, I'm not a bobble person either, but see in another comment to just k1. Thanks for that tip.
    I live in northeast Wisconsin, Sturgeon Bay, so as you may know it's getting very cool (nicer word than cold) up here, so the cowl will be something I can use when walking. Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup, no bobbles required! And I've only been to the Door Country region once but it's beautiful!! Reminds me of where I grew up in Northwest Washington!!! Anyway let me know if you have any questions! :)

      Delete