Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Feathered Arrow Headband

Feathered Arrow Headband

One of knitting's greatest challenges (in my opinion, at least) is finding a good way to use your yarn scraps. I never have the heart to throw them away, after all, and then I never have quite enough yarn to do anything really spectacular with my leftovers. Luckily, the humble headband can be a great solution to this problem - quick, fun, and gratifying to knit, they're also highly wearable and a great gift. Case in point: the Feathered Arrow Headband, which uses less than 50 yards of yarn and is easy to customize for teens to adults.

Yarn: Patons Classic Wool (100% Pure New Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #202 (Cream) - one skein
The pattern.
Subtle, but niiiiice.


Needles: straight needles in size US 8, straight needles in size US 10 (for provisional cast-on)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a headband! First, then, using your size 10 needles and a provisional cast on, cast on 17 stitches loosely. Then, we'll move straight to our size US 8 needles and our main pattern, which is Expanded Feather Pattern from page 194 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Row 1: k3, yo, ssk, k7, k2tog, yo, k3

Row 2 and all even rows: k2, p13, k2

Row 3: k3, yo, k1, ssk, k5, k2tog, k1, yo, k3

Row 5: k3, yo, k2, ssk, k3, k2tog, k2, yo, k3

Row 7: k3, yo, k3, ssk, k1, k2tog, k3, yo, k3

Row 9: k3, yo, k4, slip 1-k2tog-psso, k4, yo, k3

Knit rows 1 - 10 until piece measures roughly 19" - 21" along center strip and you've just finished row 9 of the pattern (the garter edging will be bunched up, so don't measure there. Also, you want the finished product to be an inch or two shorter than your head circumference - if you're knitting for someone with a smaller head, aim closer to 19". Make it bigger for a larger head). Block now, if desired, and then finish with the Kitchener stitch. Tuck in ends.






28 comments:

  1. I was looking for a quick project to keep in the car when I play chauffeur. Now we can use our straight needles again. Enjoy your weekend. It's going to be a warm one here. 70's.

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    1. Glad I could help! :) We're still in the '60s, but '70s look close (and oh-so-tantalizing!!!!).

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  2. I'm a little confused about this pattern...it seems like the even rows have 18 stitches and the odd rows have 17 stitches and I can't make it work out. Can you explain it to me in a little more detail?

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    1. Oh my goodness, I thought I had posted a response to this question but apparently it didn't work. I apologize! Anyway, you're correct; I wrote my wrong side rows incorrectly. I fixed it above. And please, let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  3. What is kk? I googled it and can't figure it out!

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    1. Hi again Mary!

      What's funny is that I'm pretty sure this pattern has been knit before but no one noticed the typos. The kk should simply read k3. I apologize for the errors! Obviously I try my best, but sometimes these things happen. :)

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    2. haha, that's okay! Thanks for responding!

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    3. Hopefully you won't find any more... but let me know if you have any more questions!!!! :)

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  4. what happened to row number 8 the pattern skips from row 7 to row 9.

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    1. Hi there!

      All of the even rows are the same as row 2 (which is "Row 2 and all even rows: k2, p13, k2"). Let me know if you have any more questions! :)

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  5. tried this pattern out and was highly pleased with it. i agree that after working on cardigans, pullovers and even baby items, this item went extremely fast and was gratifying. thank you for the lovely pattern :)

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    1. I'm so glad you enjoyed it! Sometimes it's nice to just get something done quickly! :)

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  6. HI, we start with 17 then they become 16 stitches... how come??

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    1. Hi there!

      I have definitely had some typo issues with this pattern. :) Can you tell me which row is giving you trouble?

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  7. Lovely, can't wait to try. Can you tell me how you did the first st in every row to get such a nice edge?

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    1. Hi Barbara! Glad you like the pattern. :) And I didn't do anything special with the edging... Just what the directions say!

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  8. Beautiful pattern can't wait to knit it .Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Glad you like it! Let me know if you have any questions. :)

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  9. I think the math for the rows might be off.... I tried this project 2x and I run out of stitches while in a row, especially in the odd rows. Could you double check for me?

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  10. Also, we should be starting off with 17 stitches right?

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    1. Hi!

      Yes, the cast-on is 17 stitches and I looked back through the pattern and everything looks right to me, since all of the decreases (ssk and k2tog) are matched by an increase (the yo), which maintains the count. Is there any chance you're missing your yarn overs?

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  11. This is very confusing how can you just cast on 17 stitches? This is a head band right 17 stitches is way way to small

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    1. Hi! The headband isn't knit bottom to top but end to end, and then seamed or grafted. At a gauge of 18 stitches = 4 inches, that means that this headband is just slightly under 4" wide, and of course as long as it needs to be. :)

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  12. Hi! Beautiful. And a new challenge for me: provisional cast on! �� When you do a "provisional cast on," do you 1) knit a row of plain knit stitch onto the scrap yarn loops/crochet chain, etc. This seems like it might make a wierd flat place when you later join a circular pattern like this one? Or do you compensate for that in the pattern? Or 2) do you start working your pattern directly onto the scrap wool crochet chain, which seems potentially awkward/difficult.

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    1. Actually, I hope I'm reading it more clearly now, as I look at your sentence structure, that I cast on the 17 stitches in my working yarn, THEN begin the main pattern. Appreciating the clarity of your writing again & sorry for cluttering your thread! Thank you.

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    2. Hi! Yes, you do the provisional cast on, at which point you'll have 17 stitches held on your scrap yarn and 17 on your needles, and then you begin the pattern. :) Let me know if you have any other questions!!!

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  13. Hi Gretchen I just found this pattern and it is beautiful. You mentioned 10 rows but the pattern says 9 rows. For the 10th row do I knit row 2 again? thanks Soosan

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    1. Hi Soosan! Yes, Row 10 is the same as Row 2. :) Let me know if you have any other questions!

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