Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Simple Eyelet Cowl

 
Simple Eyelet Cowl

I bought this yarn quite some time ago, on sale at the local yarn store. And I've been staring at it ever since, trying to find a way to show off the delicacy of the yarn in a compelling manner. Finally, I settled on this simple eyelet design, which brings a touch of class to a basic style. And while I don't have much else to say about the piece, I should mention - it was while knitting this item that I finally taught myself to hold the yarn continental style. The learning curve threw off my gauge, so I didn't get quite what the yarn package predicts. It's not a big deal, of course, just something to note if you're going to use the exact same fiber.

Yarn: Berroco Ultra Alpaca Fine (50% Peruvian wool, 20% Super Fine Alpaca, 30% Nylon; 433 yards [400 meters]/100 grams); #1214 Steel Cut Oats - one skein

The eyelets
Needles: One 20" or 24" circular needle in size US 2

Notions: Tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 26 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 2 needles

So let's do this thing! First, cast on 162 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following set-up rows:

Set-up Rows 1 - 4: purl

Set-up Row 5: p80, place marker, purl until end of round

And once those are done, we'll move on to the main pattern, which is Simple Eyelet Pattern from page 168 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. And we'll proceed as follows:

Row 1: knit, slipping extra marker when you come to it

Row 2: knit until you reach first marker, m1r, slip marker, k1, m1l, knit until end of round

Row 3: * k6, yo, k2tog * until you're one stitch before first marker, k1, slip marker, k3, * yo, k2tog, k6; rep from * until you reach end of round

Row 4: knit until you reach first marker, m1r, slip marker, k1, m1l, knit until end of round

Row 5: knit, slipping extra marker when you come to it

Row 6: knit until you reach first marker, m1r, slip marker, k1, m1l, knit until end of round

Row 7: * k2, yo, k2tog, k4 * until you're three stitches before first marker, k3, slip marker, k5, * k4, yo, k2tog, k2 * until you reach end of round

Row 8 - 10: repeat rows 4 - 6

Row 11: * k6, yo, k2tog * until you're five stitches before first marker, k5, slip marker, k7, * yo, k2tog, k6; rep from * until you reach end of round

Rows 12 - 14: repeat rows 4 - 6

Row 15: * k2, yo, k2tog, k4 * until you're seven stitches before first marker, k2, yo, k2tog, k3, slip marker, k1, * k4, yo, k2tog, k2 * until you reach end of round

Row 16: knit until you reach first marker, m1r, slip marker, k1, m1l, knit until end of round

Knit rows 1 - 16 two times, and then knit rows 1 - 15 again (this piece would probably also look nice if you knit rows 1 - 16 three times, and you'd still have enough yarn to do it if you're using the same). Knit one final row around, removing extra marker when you do so. Then complete the final edging rows:

Edging Rows 1 - 5: purl

Once these are complete, bind off loosely and tuck in ends. Block, allowing purled edges to continue to curl under when you do so.






29 comments:

  1. I never taught myself continental style of knitting. Did you knit faster? Maybe I will try it on this one too. Very pretty pattern.

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    1. Hi Mary Lynn!

      Yes, I would say it's definitely faster. And another big advantage is that you're just moving less, which gives me less soreness (since I knit a LOT, sometimes my hands get tired). Learning it is a bit of a headache, though - you have to retrain your body in a completely different way, and it gets a bit frustrating, like learning to knit again!!! Luckily I am happy with the results. :)

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  2. I'm not understanding why a V-neck? Wouldn't a simple tube be quicker, and drape softly at this weight anyway?

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    1. Hi Nancy!

      Yes, this would be easy to modify to be a tube shape. The v-neck is simply the way I imagined and made it. :)

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  3. I applaud your teaching yourself to knit continental style. I have tried and tried to knit that way but with the arthritis in my hands and fingers especially, weaving the yarn through my fingers and holding it thus is so painful. Throwing it, though using more muscles is less painful arthritis wise. Love the new cowl. The yarn looks scrumptious also. I like the V. It's your doing little things like that that set your patterns apart from others. People could just look up a stitch pattern otherwise. That is your genius Gretchen. I don't sell you short my dear.

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    1. Thanks TerriSue! What a lovely compliment. :) And I can completely understand why continental style would be more difficult with arthritis - I really struggled with finding a way to keep the tension correct, and I don't have it! I also tried to do it with double pointed needles the other day and realized I had no idea how. I'm definitely still learning!!!

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  4. It's just lovely! What are the finished measurements?

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    1. Hi Nancy!

      The finished dimensions of this piece are 24" along the inner edge and 32" along the outer. Let me know if you have any more questions! :)

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  5. Hi Gretchen! I posted this comment on ravelry but then thought maybe it was better here:

    I am still newer to knitting and have a question about making it as a tube, as sheila9488 mentioned. I am guessing it is just a matter of eliminating the m1r, k1, m1l in rows 2, 4 and 6, the subsequent repeats and row 16, opting for just knitting the entire row. Is that the only modification? What about in the odd numbered rows? I will cast on in multiples of 8 as you stated. I love the delicate pattern and can’t wait to get started. Thank you!

    Also - it won't be tapered, will it? I'm looking at your finished dimensions above and wondering if that inner/outer is implying top/bottom?

    I've been looking at your other patterns too - beautiful!!
    Thank you,
    Lisa

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    1. Hi Lisa!

      I just responded on Ravelry (I saw that one first), but, yes, you're right, there will be no tapering or difference between top measurement and bottom measurement once you make this a tube. This pattern will also knit up very close to gauge in stockinette, so you should figure out how big you want it and cast on accordingly. Please let me know if you have any other questions!!! :)

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  6. Not necessarily "new" to knitting - but new to some aspects :-) Please explain M1R and M1L - I don't have a clue. This is way cool - may have to end up doing it in a tube - but would really like to try to do it your way. And thanks, btw, for the explanation on how to change it. Greatly appreciated. Jeannie

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    1. Hi Jeannie!

      First off, in general, you can find most of your questions answered on the Glossary page (although of course I do occasionally miss stuff, and am always happy to help either way!). Anyway, that's here: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/p/glossary-of-knitting-terms.html

      Otherwise, the m1r and m1l are make one right and make one left; here's a good explanation of it: http://www.twistcollective.com/collection/component/content/article/92-how-to/1046-make-1-left-or-right-m1-m1l-m1r

      Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  7. Gretchen Tracy;
    Your voluminous gallery and generosity in making your creations available for free is really quite wonderful. Not to mention, I lovelovelove your webpage, "Balls to the Walls Knits." So do the men I knit with! I hope the men in your life treasure you--you're a treasure to my online knitting world.
    I lovelovelove this pattern, along with about a billion others you have offered. You have a lovely way with yarn.
    Amy

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    1. Wow Amy, what a lovely compliment! :) Thank you!!! And I'm also delighted to hear that you like my website name - I think I'm hilarious, but you never know how others will take it. Anyway, if you ever have any questions about any of my patterns, please don't hesitate to ask! I'm always happy to help.

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  8. question, if NOT making the vneck, just a tube, do I just eliminate the m1 rounds and cont w yo/2 tog? i love the look of YO in stockinette, would also like to make it sideways, instead of round, since I often goof up and prefer shorter rows lol lazy and ADHD..lol deb thnx

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    1. Hi Deb!

      I actually wrote out the non-increase version of this on the pattern's Ravelry page. I would copy and paste but my laptop is ridiculous about that kind of thing. Here's the link: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/simple-eyelet-cowl/comments

      Let me know if you have any more questions! :)

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  9. I am casting on!! With the Claudia Addiction (fingering) in the Go Seahawks! colorway which is great as we just scored a TD against the Bears!

    I taught myself to knit continental because it just flowed with how I held my crochet yarn. I generally wrap my pinkie, and sometimes, as with this yarn, weave over ring finger, under middle, over index.

    I recommend letting your index finger relax when the rhythm settles in, you don't need to crook it much for picking. Purling can be done a million ways, including with the yarn behind the left needle and in front of the right. I am now studying Eunny Jang for her purl technique.

    I am much faster continental and get better consistency with it. Good luck! Note, I tend to knit loose, and definitely looser than I purl... Which I am working on. :)

    Thank you for making your pattern and offering it for free!! I had earmarked the eyelet in my Barbara Walker book just a week ago. I never would have thought about the shaping you added... It's Brilliant!!!

    I love the silver you made it in. I may have to make a second in that. Very, very classy! Perhaps with a bead? That might be too heavy. I will have to try it and let you know!

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    1. Glad to hear you like the pattern! I've definitely been working more on my continental technique since I made this piece - sometimes it goes better than other times (my biggest issue is the occasional loose row that doesn't look as neat as the rest of it). I'll have to look into your suggestions. :) And I love the idea of the bead - let me know if it works out!!! Oh, and finally - as a Washington native, I support your colorway. Go Hawks!

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  10. I am casting on!! With the Claudia Addiction (fingering) in the Go Seahawks! colorway which is great as we just scored a TD against the Bears!

    I taught myself to knit continental because it just flowed with how I held my crochet yarn. I generally wrap my pinkie, and sometimes, as with this yarn, weave over ring finger, under middle, over index.

    I recommend letting your index finger relax when the rhythm settles in, you don't need to crook it much for picking. Purling can be done a million ways, including with the yarn behind the left needle and in front of the right. I am now studying Eunny Jang for her purl technique.

    I am much faster continental and get better consistency with it. Good luck! Note, I tend to knit loose, and definitely looser than I purl... Which I am working on. :)

    Thank you for making your pattern and offering it for free!! I had earmarked the eyelet in my Barbara Walker book just a week ago. I never would have thought about the shaping you added... It's Brilliant!!!

    I love the silver you made it in. I may have to make a second in that. Very, very classy! Perhaps with a bead? That might be too heavy. I will have to try it and let you know!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'm a many generations down continental knitter. Unfortunately my grandmother died before she could teach me beyond Knit and Purl, so I'm completely self-taught with years of trial/error learning. I definitely love meeting others who knit this way since most I know in America don't. Your blog is quickly becoming a favorite of mine <3

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    1. Glad to hear you like my page! :) And I am mostly self-taught, as well (I took one knitting class where I learned how to join in the round. That saved me a lot of trouble!!!!). Anyway, let me know if you ever have any questions. I'm always happy to help! :)

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  12. is there only 1 marker placed? it only mentions places one but says slip markers later, so alil confused. and can i do the edge in garter stitch? the 4 rows of purl just curls up so much, unless that was the purpose.

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    1. Hi there!

      So there are two markers - one for the row marker, and one in the middle (that you place in set-up row 5). The middle marker is the one that you simply slip on rows that give that instruction.

      As far as the edging goes - yes, it's purled in order to make that curled edge, but if you don't like it you can always substitute garter or something of your choosing! :)

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  13. Hi Gretchen
    Is it possible to knit this cowl in worsted weight yarn and how many stitches should I cast on? You have great patterns. Thank you for sharing
    them.

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    1. Hi there!

      First off, yes; you can totally make this with worsted. And if you want it to be roughly the same size, I recommend casting on 114 stitches. Then replace your set-up rows as follows:

      Set-up Rows 1 - 4: purl

      Set-up Row 5: p56, place marker, purl until end of round

      Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  14. Hi Gretchen,
    I am loving your gallery, and see so many things I’d like to try. They look like great stash-busters to boot. I just cast on for this eyelet cowl, but I think I am making an error. It looks like there should be a slipped stitch to get that nice line up the center of the cowl. I see the instructions to slip the marker between the m1r and m1l. Should I be slipping a stitch here? Thanks for your help!

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    1. Hi there!

      Glad you're enjoying my website! :) And the neatly lined up stitch in the middle is just the k1 between the m1r and m1l... let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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    2. Gretchen,
      Thanks so much for your quick reply! Now I'll get back to working the pattern exactly as you have written. Let's hope it's done in time for Christmas. ;)

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    3. I wish you Santa-like speed!!!! :)

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