Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Doug Fir Mittens

 
Doug Fir Mittens

I don't have a terribly entertaining story about these mittens, but I'll tell it anyway. First, I wanted to design a pair. Then, I did. And though the Doug Fir Mittens are definitely on the basic side, they also have a few nice features. The cuffs, for instance, are long enough to tuck into your jacket and keep your wrists warm. Plus, the tops are nice and tapered! With any luck, I'll also be adding some kid sizes soon, although these are only sized for adults.

Sizes: Small Adult (Medium Adult; Large Adult) (the small is for a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 7" from base of palm to fingertips, and the large for a hand roughly 8 1/2" - 9" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 8" from base of palm to fingertips - and finally, go medium if you're between)

Yarn: Berroco Vintage (52% Acrylic, 40% Wool, 8% Nylon; 218 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #5177 Douglas Fir – one skein (all sizes)

The thumb join. Yup, looks like a thumb.
Needles: one set of double-pointed needles (dpns) in size US 7, one set of dpns in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's get started! Using your size 5 needles, cast on 40 (40; 44) stitches and then distribute the stitches between your needles as follows: 12 stitches on the first needle, 16 stitches on the second needle, and 12 stitches on the third needle (12 stitches on the first needle, 16 stitches on the second needle, and 12 stitches on the third needle; 14 stitches on the first needle, 16 stitches on the second needle, and 14 stitches on the third needle). Join in round, and then proceed as follows:

Ribbing Row 1: * p1, k2, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures 3" (all sizes). Then, switch to your size 7 needles and knit 8 (9; 10) rows around. And once that's done, it's time to begin gusseting in the thumb. So we'll knit one set-up row, as follows:

Set-up Row 1: m1r, knit across remainder of row

And once that's done, we'll continuing gusseting like so:

Gusset Row 1: knit

Gusset Row 2: knit until you have 12 (12; 14) stitches left on your first needle, m1r; then, knit across remainder of first and second needles, k12 (k12; k14) from third needle, m1l, and knit until the end of the round (yes, this means that your first repeat of this row you will not have any stitches to knit after your m1l)

Knit gusset rows 1 & 2 until you have 19 (19; 21) stitches on your first needle and you've just finished row 1 of the pattern. On your next row, clip yarn and transfer first 7 (7; 8) stitches from your first needle and final 6 (6; 7) stitches your third needle onto a scrap of yarn, to work later as thumb. And now, we'll resume our stockinette pattern beginning at the first stitch left on needle 1, joining the mitt back in the round at the thumb break. Knit until piece measures roughly 3 1/2" (4"; 4 1/2") inches from the thumb break, and then we'll move to the decreases, which you'll find below. It no longer matters how many stitches you have on each needle, so you can rearrange as need be to complete the decreases.

Decrease Row 1: (ssk, k18, k2tog) twice (large size only; all other decrease rows will apply to all three sizes)

Decrease Rows 2 & 3: knit

Decrease Row 4: (ssk, k16, k2tog) twice

Decrease Rows 5 & 6: knit

Decrease Row 7: (ssk, k14, k2tog) twice

Decrease Row 8: knit

Decrease Row 9: (ssk, ssk, k8, k2tog, k2tog) twice

Decrease Row 10: (ssk, ssk, k4, k2tog, k2tog) twice

Decrease Row 11: (ssk, ssk, k2tog, k2tog) twice

Clip tail of yarn, thread through final 8 stitches, and pull tight. Thread to inside of mitten and knot. Finally, using your size 7 dpns, pick up your thumb stitches again, taking care not to put a seam where the break in the stitches occurs (where you rejoined your glove in the round after removing the thumb stitches from your dpns). Knit around, picking up one extra stitch at the break, until thumb measures 2" (2 1/4"; 2 1/2"). Then knit the following row:

Thumb Row 1: * k2tog *

Clip tail of yarn, thread through final 7 (7; 8) stitches, and pull tight. Thread to inside of mitten and knot. Tuck in ends. Make another.






66 comments:

  1. Gretchen,
    These are absolutely beautiful! I love the clean, crisp line of them. Bravo!

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    1. Thank you! That's what I was aiming for. :)

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    2. I'm sorry, I must have missed something. You state these directions are for beginners. Where are the abbreviations found? I don't know what an m1r is or a ssk is, please help.

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    3. Ok, never mind, I see a Linda on August said to go to that link she posted.

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    4. Great! Let me know if you have any other questions. :) Oh, and if you got here from AllFreeKnitting, they are the ones who determine the difficulty rating. These mittens are easy for mittens, but I wouldn't say mittens are necessarily an "easy" project. :)

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  2. I may try these when I am done my Madeira Mesh Cowl that I am casting on right now. Thank you for another great pattern.


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    1. Glad to hear you like them! :) As always, let me know if you have any questions!

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  3. Question-after you put the stitches on a holder The directions say knit until piece measures 3 1/2 inches. Is it 3 1/2 inches from where you put the stitches on the holder? Or something else? Thanks so much for the pattern I love it!

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    1. Yup, I meant from the thumb break. Thanks for letting me know about the confusion, I'll update the pattern. :) And please let me know if you have any more questions.

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    2. Thanks! I thought that's what you meant but wanted to be sure!

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    3. Well, I always appreciate the opportunity to clarify my patterns, so I appreciate the question. :)

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    4. Hi Linda!

      In general, you can find answers to terminology questions on my Glossary page, here: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/p/glossary-of-knitting-terms.html (although I do occasionally miss something). As far as the m1r and the m1l go, those are increases that lean either right or left (they stand for make 1 right and make 1 left). You can find more information about them here: http://www.twistcollective.com/collection/component/content/article/92-how-to/1046-make-1-left-or-right-m1-m1l-m1r

      And please, let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  4. I'd like to make your mittens out of Angel Hair yarn (5 weight). How do I adjust the pattern?

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    1. Hi Kimberly! I have modified the pattern for your gauge yarn; you can find it below. I have double-checked it, but, as always when I make a pattern I haven't knit, you may find some issue. Please let me know if you do! :)

      Sizes: Small Adult (Medium Adult; Large Adult) (the small is for a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 7" from base of palm to fingertips, and the large for a hand roughly 8 1/2" - 9" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 8" from base of palm to fingertips - and finally, go medium if you're between)

      Needles: one set of double-pointed needles (dpns) in size US 9, one set of dpns in size US 11

      Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

      So let's get started! Using your size 9 needles, cast on 24 (24; 28) stitches and then distribute the stitches between your needles as follows: 6 stitches on the first needle, 10 stitches on the second needle, and 6 stitches on the third needle (6 stitches on the first needle, 10 stitches on the second needle, and 6 stitches on the third needle; 8 stitches on the first needle, 10 stitches on the second needle, and 8 stitches on the third needle). Join in round, and then proceed as follows.

      Ribbing Row 1* p1, k2, p1; rep from *


      Knit this ribbing row until piece measures 3" (all sizes). Then, switch to your size 11 needles and knit 4 (4; 5) rows around. And once that's done, it's time to begin gusseting in the thumb. So we'll knit one set-up row, as follows:

      Set-up Row 1: m1r, knit across remainder of row

      And once that's done, we'll continuing gusseting like so:

      Gusset Row 1: knit

      Gusset Row 2: knit until you have 6 (6; 8) left on your first needle, m1r; then, knit across remainder of first and second needles, k6 (k6; k8) from third needle, m1l, and knit until the end of the round (yes, this means that your first repeat of this row you will not have any stitches to knit after your m1l)

      Knit gusset rows 1 & 2 until you have 11 (11; 13) stitches on your first needle and you've just finished row 1 of the pattern. On your next row, clip yarn and transfer first 5 (5; 6) stitches from your first needle and final 4 (4; 5) stitches your third needle onto a scrap of yarn, to work later as thumb. And now, we'll resume our stockinette pattern beginning at the first stitch left on needle 1, joining the mitt back in the round at the thumb break. Knit until piece measures roughly 3 1/2" (4"; 4 1/2") inches from the thumb break, and then we'll move to the decreases, which you'll find below. It no longer matters how many stitches you have on each needle, so you can rearrange as need be to complete the decreases.

      Decrease Row 1: (ssk, k10, k2tog) twice (large size only; all other decrease rows will apply to all three sizes)

      Decrease Rows 2 & 3: knit

      Decrease Row 4: (ssk, k8, k2tog) twice

      Decrease Row 5: knit

      Decrease Row 6: (ssk, ssk, k2, k2tog, k2tog) twice

      Decrease Row 7: (ssk, k2tog, k2tog) twice

      Clip tail of yarn, thread through final 6 stitches, and pull tight. Thread to inside of mitten and knot. Finally, using your size 11 dpns, pick up your thumb stitches again, taking care not to put a seam where the break in the stitches occurs (where you rejoined your glove in the round after removing the thumb stitches from your dpns). Knit around, picking up one extra stitch at the break, until thumb measures 2" (2 1/4"; 2 1/2"). Then knit the following row:

      Thumb Row 1: * k2tog *

      Clip tail of yarn, thread through final 7 (7; 8) stitches, and pull tight. Thread to inside of mitten and knot. Tuck in ends. Make another.

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    2. Just so you know, I revised this pattern below. :)

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  5. Hi there,
    At the part "On your next row, clip yarn and transfer first 7 (7; 8) stitches from your first needle and final 6 (6; 7) stitches your third needle onto a scrap of yarn, to work later as thumb.", I've slipped my stitches onto a holder rather than scrap yarn. However, my working yarn ends up in the middle of the row of saved stitches, and I don't feel like it should be stretched across to continue knitting in the round. I hope this makes sense. Can you advise? Thanks so much!

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    1. Hi there!

      So this is an issue I've gone back and forth on - your two choices are to:

      1. Cut your yarn. As written, you're right, the yarn is the middle of the saved stitches, and I don't recommend slipping it behind all of those stitches, which is why I've instructed to clip it. Then you'll simply have to start again at the beginning of the hand stitches, and you'll have two more ends to tuck in.

      or

      2. Knit across those first 7 (7; 8) stitches and then transfer the thumb stitches to save. The reason I didn't instruct to do this is because sometimes, especially on the larger yarn, you can actually see that you have those extra stitches. However, it's really not that big of an issue, so if you'd prefer to do it this way it will totally work!

      Does that make sense? :)

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    2. Yes, thank you! This is the best mitten pattern I've found so far. I've never had a mitten go so flawlessly/not having to pull it out and start over. I've already recommended this pattern to a friend who wanted to try mittens. Thanks again! xx

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    3. Well, I'm glad to hear it! :) Back when I used to knit magazine patterns (don't have time for that now!), I would always get frustrated by the abbreviated instructions. One of the main advantages of having my own site is that I can be as verbose as I like, and I think it makes the instruction clearer!!!

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    4. Definitely! How can I modify this for size 5 yarn (bulky)?

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    5. Just check the comment above yours - someone else already asked. :)

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    6. Oh, I thought bulky and angel hair were different yarns. Thanks.

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    7. Yes, the Angel Hair is just a specific bulky yarn. Its gauge, however , is 14 in = 12 stitches on size 11 needles, so the pattern will work with any yarn of the same! :)

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    8. Sorry, but the revised pattern for size 5 yarn says to cast on 24 stitches, dividing it as 6-10-6 on needles, but that only equals 22 stitches...

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    9. You are totally right! :) Here's the revision:

      Sizes: Small Adult (Medium Adult; Large Adult) (the small is for a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 7" from base of palm to fingertips, and the large for a hand roughly 8 1/2" - 9" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 8" from base of palm to fingertips - and finally, go medium if you're between)

      Needles: one set of double-pointed needles (dpns) in size US 9, one set of dpns in size US 11

      Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

      So let's get started! Using your size 9 needles, cast on 24 (24; 28) stitches and then distribute the stitches between your needles as follows: 7 stitches on the first needle, 10 stitches on the second needle, and 7 stitches on the third needle (7 stitches on the first needle, 10 stitches on the second needle, and 7 stitches on the third needle; 9 stitches on the first needle, 10 stitches on the second needle, and 9 stitches on the third needle). Join in round, and then proceed as follows.

      Ribbing Row 1* p1, k2, p1; rep from *

      Knit this ribbing row until piece measures 3" (all sizes). Then, switch to your size 11 needles and knit 4 (4; 5) rows around. And once that's done, it's time to begin gusseting in the thumb. So we'll knit one set-up row, as follows:

      Set-up Row 1: m1r, knit across remainder of row

      And once that's done, we'll continuing gusseting like so:

      Gusset Row 1: knit

      Gusset Row 2: knit until you have 7 (7; 9) left on your first needle, m1r; then, knit across remainder of first and second needles, k7 (k7; k9) from third needle, m1l, and knit until the end of the round (yes, this means that your first repeat of this row you will not have any stitches to knit after your m1l)

      Knit gusset rows 1 & 2 until you have 12 (12; 14) stitches on your first needle and you've just finished row 1 of the pattern. On your next row, clip yarn and transfer first 5 (5; 6) stitches from your first needle and final 4 (4; 5) stitches your third needle onto a scrap of yarn, to work later as thumb. And now, we'll resume our stockinette pattern beginning at the first stitch left on needle 1, joining the mitt back in the round at the thumb break. Knit until piece measures roughly 3 1/2" (4"; 4 1/2") inches from the thumb break, and then we'll move to the decreases, which you'll find below. It no longer matters how many stitches you have on each needle, so you can rearrange as need be to complete the decreases.

      Decrease Row 1: (ssk, k10, k2tog) twice (large size only; all other decrease rows will apply to all three sizes)

      Decrease Rows 2 & 3: knit

      Decrease Row 4: (ssk, k8, k2tog) twice

      Decrease Row 5: knit

      Decrease Row 6: (ssk, ssk, k2, k2tog, k2tog) twice

      Decrease Row 7: (ssk, k2tog, k2tog) twice

      Clip tail of yarn, thread through final 6 stitches, and pull tight. Thread to inside of mitten and knot. Finally, using your size 11 dpns, pick up your thumb stitches again, taking care not to put a seam where the break in the stitches occurs (where you rejoined your glove in the round after removing the thumb stitches from your dpns). Knit around, picking up one extra stitch at the break, until thumb measures 2" (2 1/4"; 2 1/2"). Then knit the following row:

      Thumb Row 1: * k2tog *

      Clip tail of yarn, thread through final 7 (7; 8) stitches, and pull tight. Thread to inside of mitten and knot. Tuck in ends. Make another.

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  6. Thank you, and so sorry for being a pain!

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    1. Don't be silly - you're not a pain! I'm always happy to help. :)

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  7. Gretchen, I'm a self taught knitter. I've made socks, lace and a sweater or two and now I want to try mittens! Your pattern seems the most comprehensive I've found except: "Gusset Row 2: knit until you have 12 (12; 14) left on your first needle, m1r; then, knit across remainder of first and second needles" I have 13 stitches on my first needle so I knit one stitch before I M1R, correct? Thanks Pam

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    1. Exactly! And I'm totally missing the word "stitches," aren't I? I'll fix it! And let me know if you have any other questions. :)

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  8. Hello, I am having a little issue with the gauge of the yarn I want to use. I get 22 stitches in 4 inches instead of 20; would that work or is that too much of a difference that would effect the whole mitten?

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    1. Hi there!

      Three options: one, go up a needle size and see if your gauge matches. Two: don't worry about the gauge too much, since the mittens will stretch a bit. Three: if you're making the smalls or the mediums, cast on for the larges but follow the length directions for the smaller size. :)

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  9. Tracy I am teaching these mittens to 4-h girls, would you please write out the gusset row 2 for us. thanks

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    1. Hi there!

      If you'd like me to write out gusset row 2 without all of the extra sizes, I'll need to know which size you're making. Let me know! :)

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    2. We are working on adult small and adult medium Thanks how do you divide 40 stitches with pl k2 pl without 2 purl stitches together

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    3. Hi again! For both adult small and medium, gusset row 2 looks like this:

      Gusset Row 2: knit until you have 12 stitches left on your first needle, m1r; then, knit across remainder of first and second needles, k12 from third needle, m1l, and knit until the end of the round (yes, this means that your first repeat of this row you will not have any stitches to knit after your m1l)

      But perhaps your question is actually about the ribbing? It is a k2, p2 ribbing, it's just that the end of the row occurs between two purl stitches instead of between a knit and a purl, which is why I wrote it as a * p1, k2, p1 *. Let me know if you have any more questions! :)

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    4. Thanks for all the great information

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    5. Let me know if you need help with anything else! :)

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  10. Tract I am sorry but on row 2 of the gusset do you mean knit 12 stitches and do a M1r then knit all stitches on needle 2&3 then knit 12 stitches on needle 4?

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    1. Nope, I mean knit until you have 12 stitches left on needle 1. This means that you'll only be knitting one stitch (your previous m1r) before your m1r the first time around. When you hit gusset row 2 the second time, you'll knit 2 before you m1r, and so on. The same thing goes for the other end of the gusset; you'll knit all your stitches on needle 2, and knit across 12 from needle 3 before you m1l. Your first time around, there will only be 12 stitches on that needle, so you will m1l at the end of the needle. When you reach it the second time, you will have 13 stitches on your needle, so you will k12, m1l, and then k1. :)

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  11. I'm a little confused about the first decrease row, particularly when it says (ssk, k18, k2tog). I have 40 stitches on my needles and so do I ssk for the first 12, knit 18, then k2tog for the last 12?

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    1. Hi there! It sounds like you're making either the small or the medium mittens, so you skip that decrease row altogether! You'll knit two more rows around (decrease rows 2 & 3), and then for decrease row 4 you'll simply perform the entire instruction twice. Or in other words, you'll ssk, k16, k2tog, ssk, k16, k2tog. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  12. Do you have a preferred/suggested method for joining the yarn for the thumb?

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    1. I just start knitting! The first stitches will tug out a bit when you reach them again, but you can just pull the tail back down and as long as you weave it in well you won't have a problem! :)

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  13. I'm having a bit of trouble understanding what to do with the thumb. I did the gusset with no problem, but when I go to slip the stitches onto my holding yarn my working yarn is part of that and I'm not sure if I did something wrong or am missing some crucial element. Thanks for your help!

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    1. Just realized you answered this in a previous comment! Thanks!

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    2. Glad to have (indirectly) helped! Let me know if you have any other questions. :)

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  14. Hello, I'm making adult large and have 42 stitches before decrease row 1. Therefore from what I read I'm short 2 st. So to decrease do I: (ssk, k18, k2tog) once then (k18, k2tog)?! Thanks and look forward to hearing from you!

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    1. Hi Ellen! I would just (ssk, k18, k2tog) once and then k20 - then you'll be caught up with the pattern and I doubt you'll even notice the difference when it's done! :)

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  15. It's great that you take the time to answer all your comments. Your blog is one of the best I have seen. Great patterns but not just patterns but help to make it through the tuff spots. Thank you.

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    1. What a nice compliment, thank you! And yes, I do try to help when I can... seems like the neighborly thing to do!

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  16. Hi, I'm a bit confused about the part that says "joining the mitt back in the round at the thumb break." After I clip the yarn, how do I use it to join the stitches from the last needle to the stitches on the first needle? Thanks!

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    1. Hi! You have a couple options for rejoining; 1, you could do nothing special and just keeping knitting at the break. Then we you go to tuck in your clipped tail during finishing you can use it to snug together any stitches or loose bits or whatever. 2, you could swap your first and last stitches, as you might when joining anything in the round. You'll pick up an extra stitch right over this place when you add the thumb, so this should be pretty much invisible. Either way works!

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  17. I am an experienced knitter but I too am a little confused by your references to M1r and SSk. Please explain.

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    1. Hi there!

      The m1r is an increase (it stands for make 1 right). Usually I put a link to some instructions when I use it, but I see I forgot to do that here. I've updated it, and you can find more information as follows:

      https://www.purlsoho.com/create/make-one-right-m1r-make-one-left-m1l/

      As far as the ssk goes, it's a standard, left-leaning 2-to-1 decrease (and stands for slip, slip, knit). You can find more info here:

      https://www.thespruce.com/slip-knit-ssk-2116155

      And finally, if you have more terminology questions in the future I try to provide all the information you might need on my glossary page (although I do occasionally miss stuff so please feel free to let me know when it happens!).

      http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/p/glossary-of-knitting-terms.html

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  18. Hello!
    For starting the thumb, you say to pick up the loops we were holding and start knitting, and to be careful of the seam... You said to pick up one loop on the seam... I picked up one of the stitches but I have a big gap where the seam is, I can fit my pinky through it. Im not sure what I did wrong hefe. Please help! Also, love the pattern, thanks!

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    1. Hi there!

      One question: did you start working the thumb or just pick up the stitches so far? I ask because the hole definitely looks big when you first pick up the stitches, but as you work (and tug down on your joined yarn tail) it usually gets better. If you're still not having it look better, though, you could try to pick up two stitches at the hole instead of one. Here's a tutorial with more information (although they describe it as "picking up and knitting"). http://www.stitchdiva.com/tutorials/knitting/picking-up-stitches

      Hope that helps! And let me know if you have any other questions!

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  19. In your picture of the mittens, the m1r and m1l seem to be around the thumb. But the way it's turning out for me is that the last needle increases are around the thumb,but the first needle increases are not. I suppose I am doing something wrong, but I am making increases where the patterns to.

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    1. Hmm, is it possible that you're knitting ACROSS your first 12, 12, 14 stitches on your first needle instead of knitting UNTIL you have that many left? Both sets of increases should definitely mirror each other on either side of the row break...

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  20. *where the pattern tells me to

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  21. Gretchen, I've just got to say that ... your patterns are lovely, easy to follow and are surpassed only by your bright and shiny, friendly personality and generosity! You are a joy to 'know.' Thank you, for being the way you are, Gretchen. :)

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    1. Oh, you are too kind! And I figure I can make all the terrible jokes I like if I'm not charging for patterns!!! :)

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  22. Ah ha haaaaaaa! You go, girl! LOL

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