Showing posts with label dk. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dk. Show all posts

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Single Stripe Mittens

Single Stripe Mittens
pictured in size small

Sometimes I buy yarns because they BEG me to bring them home, all puppy dog eyes and soft squishiness. Sometimes I buy yarns because they're on great sale, and I'm my mother's daughter. And sometimes (like this time) I buy yarns because I happen to wander into a LYS in Lithuania and it's so small that I feel like I HAVE to buy something, but they stock almost exclusively Turkish and Italian yarns (so I can't find anything local) and nothing really catches my eye. Such was the case for me recently, until I finally spotted this nice alpaca. And then, of course, I used it for this fun design, which avoids any broken stripes by nestling the color change against a two-stitch stripe up the side rather than placing it at the beginning of the round.

Oh, and as a side note, this yarn is slightly non-standard sized, for recommended needle size and gauge, and you will probably find more yarns that give you 20 stitches per 4 inches on a slightly larger needle. If that's the case, simply adjust your needle size to gauge as needed. :)

Sizes: Small Adult (Medium Adult; Large Adult) (the small is for a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 7" from base of palm to fingertips, and the large for a hand roughly 8 1/2" - 9" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 8" from base of palm to fingertips - and finally, go medium if you're between)

Yarn: Alvita Alpaka (100% Alpaca; 109 yards [100 meters]/50 grams); #90 Brown - one skein (one skein; one to two skeins) (color A) & #10 Ivory – one skein (all sizes) (color B)

One mitten, near a tree. You
can just get a peek at the stripe
down the side...
Needles: one set of double-pointed needles (dpns) in size US 6, one set of dpns in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles

So let's get started! Using your size 4 needles and your color A yarn, then, cast on 40 (40; 44) stitches loosely, distribute between three double pointed needles as follows: 12 stitches on first needle, 16 on second, 12 on third (12 stitches on first, 16 on second, 12 on third; 14 stitches on first, 16 on second, 14 on third) and join in round. Then we'll work some ribbing for the cuff, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures roughly 2" (2.5"; 3"). Transfer work to your size US 6 needles and knit one row around. Clip your yarn tail, since we'll be changing colors halfway through our rounds. Then, we'll begin our color pattern, as follows:

Row 1: using your color B yarn, k19 (k19; k21); then, using your color A yarn, knit until end of round

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Xcellent Adventure Hat

Xcellent Adventure Hat
Xcellent Adventure Hat
pictured in small size


What can I say about this hat? Well, I guess I could start by mentioning that I still had a skein of this yarn left over after finishing the Rainbow Rib Mitts, and I thought that the variegation of it might work well for a larger project (since the color sections are on the long side, I thought I would at least get one full round in each color gradient for a hat). And since I also love the look of long slipped stitches with color work, I decided to combine the yarn and slipped stitch pattern for a fun, textured design.

Sizes: Teen/Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Lang Yarns Novena Color (50% Wool, 30% Alpaca, 20% Nylon; 240 yards [220 meters]/50 grams); #0009 Rosa/Violet/Blue - one to two skeins (two skeins) (side note again: I completed my size small hat with one skein)

Xcellent Adventure Hat
A better look at the finish.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6; one 16" circular needle in size US 8, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette 


So let's make a hat! Using your size US 6 circular needle, then, cast on 112 (128) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll do a simple ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row measures roughly 1.75" (2"). Transfer your work to your size US 8 needle and knit three rows around. Then we'll begin the pattern, as follows. Notice that your slipped stitches will seem short by the time you reach rows 11 & 23; simply tug them a bit when you work those rows to make them more pronounced. :)

Rows 1 - 4: * slip 1 stitch with yarn in back (sl1), k6, sl1, k8; rep from *

Row 5: * drop slipped stitch to front of work and slip next 3 stitches purlwise from left needle to right needle, pick up and place dropped stitch on left-hand needle, slip 3 stitches back to left-hand needle, and k4; then, slip next 3 stitches purlwise from left needle to right needle, drop next slipped stitch to front of work, slip the 3 stitches back to your left-hand needle and pick up and place dropped stitch on left hand needle, k12 *

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Rainbow Rib Mitts

Rainbow Rib Mitts
Rainbow Rib Mitts
as seen near an *extremely* green pond thing

I keep looking at the hands in these photos and thinking, "dang how did my nails get so long?!?!" (since I'm always the hands in my photos). Then I keep remembering that today, for the first time ever (that's not exactly true - my husband has posed a few times), I AM NOT THE HANDS IN MY PHOTOS. Not that my lovely hand model will probably ever agree to lend her digits to my knitting again, since I spent the whole shoot giving her instructions like, "Now happy fingers! No, happier!" and, "Angle your hands like you're standing up, but instead squat so your head doesn't cast a shadow on the mitts." Anyway, where was I? Oh yeah, I got this yarn ON SALE BABY, and it's a beautiful choice for this basic-but-not-boring pattern. Oh, and word to the wise - if you use the same fiber, be forewarned that the pattern doesn't repeat in a linear fashion, but like a palindrome (so the colors don't go A B C D A B C D but more like A B C D D D C B A). So, although I made my mitts match fairly well, I had to be fussy to get there, and it's possible that if you're equally fussy about matching you may need more than one skein to complete the pattern.

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium up to 8 3/4", and the large goes up to about 9.5")

Yarn: Lang Yarns Novena Color (50% Wool, 30% Alpaca, 20% Nylon; 240 yards [220 meters]/50 grams); #0009 Rosa/Violet/Blue - one skein (all sizes)


Rainbow Rib Mitts
A closer view of the gusset
Or the "thumb crotch," as I yelled several
times at my hardworking hand model.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 6; one set of dpns in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, scrap yarn

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 7 needles

And that brings us to the pattern! Using your size US 6 needles, then, cast on 40 (44; 48) stitches loosely and distribute evenly between three dpns. Join in round, being careful not to twist your cast on when you complete the join. Then we'll work ribbing as follows:


Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Skye Shawl

Skye Shawl
Skye Shawl

Those of you who follow my Instagram may realize that I attended the Edinburgh Yarn Festival last month (not that I posted much - one photo, maybe?). What you may NOT realize is that I also bought a crapload of yarn. Of course, because my mother raised me to value a sweet deal, I bought both brand-new-perfect-condition stuff and quite a few "odds and ends," like the beautiful naturally-dyed fibers from the Skye Shilasdair Shop that I used for this design. Naturally, then, the Skye Shawl is designed for just such a collection of funny bits and leftovers, in case you have a few odds and ends of your own laying around the house. :) I ALSO bought a kitchen scale so that I could accurately measure my yardage; as you can see, I've bolded all of the colors and yardages below so that you can get a good idea of how many yards of each color you need to make this shawl for yourself (I've also already added a 10% cushion on the amounts I used, in case you're wondering).

Oh, and I almost forgot! I also made technique videos for this piece, which demonstrate all of the important stuff you need to make this shawl. And yes, I know I start EVERY SINGLE ONE by saying "okay." Okay? Okay! Apparently I can't help myself. 

Oh, and double oh: the instructions for this shawl make it look much more complicated/difficult than it actually is! Take heart, it's not that bad, I promise. :)

Yarn: The Skye Shilasdair Shop oddments (unknown blend of Alpaca, Merino, Cashmere, Angora, and Silk); Yellow/Green (Color A; 45 grams, or roughly 135 yards), Dark Pink (Color B; 30 grams, or roughly 90 yards), Lime Green (Color C; 10 grams or roughly 30 yards), Light Pink (Color D; 20 grams or roughly 60 yards), Dark Green (Color E; 20 grams or roughly 60 yards)

Skye Shawl
A closer looks at the stripes and the edgings.
Needles: One pair of needles in size US 5, two double pointed needles in size US 5, and one US 6 or 7 needle for provisional cast-on (this is optional; you're only casting on 4 stitches provisionally, so your tightness is not of great importance)

Notions: 2 tapestry needles, 1 18" length of scrap yarn, and 2 roughly 3' lengths of scrap yarn, preferably in cotton

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a shawl then! And remember - as I mentioned above, I filmed a series of technique videos for this pattern, so (hopefully!) you will be able to find a technique video just below any of the instructions with which you may need help. And with that in mind, in order to get this particular blend of stripes, we're going to begin by making the i-cord on the top middle part of the shawl, and then work the striped middle panel down from there. So, first, using one of your size US 5 dpns or your size US 6 or 7 needle and your color A yarn, cast on 4 stitches provisionally, making sure the scrap yarn you use to hold your provisional stitches is roughly 3' long. If you used a larger needle for your provisional cast on, transfer stitches to one of your size 5 dpns now. And if you need some help with these instructions, then the video below is for you (side note: when I watched it back I realized that I could have explained myself better. What I mean by "making space" is that if you're not going to size up your needle for your cast on, you should NOT pull the stitches around the scrap yarn tight, but instead leave them a little loose, as demonstrated).

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Reverb Shawl

Reverb Shawl
Reverb Shawl

First off, I hate to admit how long I've been working on this shawl, because, to be quite honest, I can no longer even remember when I started (nevertheless, I am 98% sure it was last year). And I know that may not sound like *that* long to some of you with years-old WIPs sitting around in your drawers, but I'm one of those people who loses steam VERY EASILY the minute I set something down, and will often literally throw out a project to ease the psychic burden of staring at it, unfinished, for too long (but I swear I've gotten better about this as I get older!!! really, it's true!!!). Anyway, what was my point? I have no idea, but I did make a shawl! And quite a shawl it is - made with worsted weight so it doesn't work up too slowly, the Reverb Shawl also combines twisted stitches and mesh for some interesting textural detail. So make one of your own, if you want! I will send lots of good energy your way so you don't get bogged down halfway through. :)

Yarn: Malabrigo Worsted (100% Merino Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #193 Jacinto - 2 skeins

Reverb Shawl
Another look at the pattern
Needles: One 32" or longer circular needle in size US 7
 

Notions: Tapestry needle, 2 stitch markers

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a shawl! Begin by casting on 3 stitches loosely, and then working 8 rows in garter stitch to create a tab. Then, without turning work, yarn over (yo) twice, pick up 1 stitch about 1/3rd of the way down along the edge of the tab, (yo) twice again, pick up 1 stitch roughly 2/3rds of the way down the edge of the tab, and (yo) twice again. Complete tab by picking up 3 stitches along cast-on edge; you should now have stitches coming from 3 sides of the tab - 3 along original working edge - 8 along the side (counting each double yo as 2 stitches), and 3 along the cast-on edge. Then, work a few set-up rows as follows. Oh, and you'll need the following terminology, as well:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Arrowhead Hat

Arrowhead Hat
Arrowhead Hat
Pictured in Adult Large (that's why Hedwig's in
her big hair today)

The story behind this hat is simple: I have a friend who struggles to find a hat big enough for her hair, and I happen to know an independent knitwear accessory designer who loves to make people stuff they can't seem to find in stores (hint: it's me!). So, basically, the Arrowhead Hat is designed with plenty of slouch and two different sizes to accommodate as much or as little hair as you'd like to put inside of it.

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large) 

Yarn: Sommer Merino 125 (100% Superwash Wool; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #167 - 2 skeins (both sizes)

Arrowhead Hat
A better look
at the back.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, 1 stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 6 needles

And that makes it hat time! Using your size US 5 needle, then, cast on 112 (128) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 2.5" in length, and then transfer work to your size US 6 circular needle. Then we'll begin our main pattern, which is a combination of Arrowhead Lace and Little Arrowhead Lace from page 193 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Row 1: knit

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Gathered Rib Scarf

Gathered Rib Scarf
Gathered Rib Scarf

Okay, I wish I had a good story behind this scarf, but I don't. Basically, I've just been on kind of a variegated yarn kick lately, in part because I find it super difficult to find good patterns for but I love buying it, so... you do the math! Someone's gotta come up with some stuff, right? Anyway, I designed this particular scarf to be on the shorter side, since I only had 2 skeins of yarn. However, it would look very nice if you have a bit more yardage to work with, also, or even in a solid color yarn! 

Yarn: Lana Grossa Cinque Multi (60% Virgin Wool, 40% Polyacrylic; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #013 - two to three skeins

Gathered Rib Scarf
A better look at the rib,
and the gathering. See how it
works with the variegation???
Needles: Straight needles in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

And now that we've got all of that covered, let's make a scarf! To begin with, then cast on 50 stitches loosely. Then, we'll work as follows:

Rows 1, 3, 5, & 7 (wrong side): slip 1 stitch purlwise with yarn in back (sl1 wyib), k1, (p6, k4) four times, p6, k2

Rows 2, 4, & 6: slip 1 stitch purlwise with yarn in front (sl1 wyif), p1, (k6, p4) four times, k6, p2

Row 8: sl1 wyif, p1, (k2tog through back loops [k2tog-tbl], k2, k2tog, p4) four times, k2tog-tbl, k2, k2tog, p2

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

True Blue Shawlette

True Blue Shawlette
True Blue Shawlette

On most occasions, I try to keep my knitting fairly seasonal (or representative of the months to come). I'm sure that's why I bought this yarn and started this shawlette months ago, only to get hung up by my uncooperative forearms. Now that I've finally finished the piece, though, we should all just pretend it's summer again, and that the cold breeze I felt this afternoon was actually as balmy as July's winds. Or not, in which case you can file this pattern away for next year, when you've got 300+ yards of a cotton-, silk-, linen-, or bamboo-based fiber and a hankering for a short shawl (or even a big one, if you want to keep working and you've got enough yarn!).

Yarn: Lana Grossa 365 Cotone (88% Cotton, 12% Polyamide; 153 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #026 Türkisgrün - two skeins

True Blue Shawlette
A better look at the pattern.
Basically, just lace and garter stitch!
Needles: One 32" or longer circular needle in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a little shawl thing! And in case I wasn't clear enough before, this pattern is good for those occasions when you're not sure if you've got enough yarn or not; since it's designed from the rounded bottom up, it's completely scalable in size - make it small if you've only got 300 yards, or bigger with more. No matter how much yarn you've got, however, you'll begin by casting on 3 stitches loosely, and then working 8 rows in garter stitch to create a tab of sorts. Then, without turning work, yarn over (yo) twice, pick up 1 stitch about 1/3rd of the way down along the edge of the tab, (yo) twice again, pick up 1 stitch roughly 2/3rds of the way down the edge of the tab, and (yo) twice again. Complete tab by picking up 3 stitches along cast-on edge; you should now have stitches coming from 3 sides of the tab - 3 along original working edge - 8 along the side (counting each double yo as 2 stitches), and 3 along the cast-on edge. Then, work a few set-up rows as follows:

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Divine Drape Cowl

Divine Drape Cowl
Divine Drape Cowl

If this cowl is one thing, it's a summer-to-autumn wardrobe staple that would look great in any color, at virtually any length. And if it's two things, it's also yet another one of my attempts at the absolute perfect cowl design: not too bulky around the back of the neck, but with enough fun in the front to attract some attention. And heck, while we're at it - why not make it THREE things -- or in other words, your next project? ;)

Yarn: Premier Yarns Cotton Fair (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 317 yards [290 meters]/100 grams); #27-09 Lavender - one skein

Divine Drape Cowl
The main stitch pattern. Airy
and pretty, no?
Needles: Straight needles in size US 3, straight needles in size US 4, straight needles in size US 8, and straight needles in size US 5 for provisional cast-on

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 23 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 4 needles

So let's make a cowl! Using your size 5 needles and a length of scrap yarn, then, cast on 35 stitches provisionally. Transfer work to your size 4 needles and knit two transition rows, as follows:

Transition Row 1 (wrong side): purl

Transition Row 2: knit

Knit these two transition rows, and then transfer work to your size 3 needles and we'll work a ribbing for a bit, like so:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): p1, * k1, p1; rep from * until you reach the end of the row

Ribbing Row 2: k1, * p1, k1 *

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag

Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
pictured in size medium

I came up with the idea for this bag for a very simple reason: you can find this style EVERYWHERE in Switzerland. Seriously, what I remember (perhaps incorrectly) as a passing fad in the United States took deep roots in Swiss soil, much like the "Parental Advisory" branded clothing and hats that, while virtually extinct stateside, still roam the Swiss countryside like long-hunted wolves. Wait! What am I talking about? Oh yeah - the bag! They're everywhere here, and they're all the same size: adult. Which gave me the oh-so-clever idea to create a variety of kid sizes, since kids, without question, freakin' love bags. Oh, and if you love the look of this too, you're in luck, since the extra-large size is basically just adult. :)

Sizes: Small (Medium; Large; Extra-Large) (approximate finished dimensions: 6" wide by 7.5" tall [8" x 9.5"; 10" x 11.5", 12" x 13.5"])

Yarn: Patons Grace (100% Mercerized Cotton; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #62628 Fiesta - 2 skeins (2 skeins; 3 skeins; 3 - 4 skeins)

A closer view of the grommet
hole thingamabob. I know, I'm a poet.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 4, one 16" circular needle in size US 5, double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5 for making i-cords, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, 3 stitch markers

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's get this started! To begin this bag, then, we'll start by knitting the two drawstring-holding portions at the top separately and back-and-forth before joining them in the round (so the purled strips at the top that your straps lace through). With that in mind, and using your size US 4 needles, cast on 36 (48; 60; 72) stitches loosely. Then work the following rows:

Row 1 (right side): slip 1 stitch, purl until end of row

Row 2: slip 1 stitch, knit until end of row

Knit rows 1 & 2 five times and then knit row 1 once more (all sizes). Then, clip yarn tail and transfer work to your size US 5 circular needle to resume later. Again, using your size US 4 needles, cast on 36 (48; 60; 72) stitches loosely and work rows 1 & 2 five times and row 1 once more, although this time, when you finish, don't clip the tail. Transfer the work you've just finished to your size 5 needle, next to your other piece, making sure that the right sides (purl sides) are both oriented correctly, and that the piece you've just finished, with the running yarn connected, is lined up on the right-hand needle of your circulars so that you can continue work in the round. At that point, join in round, place row marker, and then knit one row around. Then we'll knit one transition/marker placement row, as follows. Since it's different for the different sizes, I have listed each size's row separately for ease.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Carved Diamond Cowl

Carved Diamond Cowl
Carved Diamond Cowl

I would like to tell you something about this cowl, but the Pentatonix video blaring at 1,000 decibels to my right is distracting me slightly (what can I say, my children are obsessed!). So I'll just say, first of all, thank you to the dear friend who mailed me this yarn all the way from Alaska. And then I'll get right to the pattern part, so you can make one of your own!

Yarn: Premier Yarns Cotton Fair (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 317 yards [290 meters]/100 grams); #27-04 Turquoise - one skein

Carved Diamond Cowl
Another view of the pattern.
Quite pretty, no?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 4 (optional but recommended: one 16" circular needle in size US 3 for edging)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 23 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 4 needle, cast on 128 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round (if you're doing your edging in size 3, use that needle instead). Purl five rows around. Switch to your size 4 needle, if you didn't cast on with it, and then we'll continue in Carved Diamond Pattern from page 150 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. You will need the following notation to continue:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Primavera Wrap

Primavera Wrap
Primavera Wrap

When I first bought this yarn, I definitely considered it a bit of a score; not only was it a fancy color gradient with size and texture fluctuations to boot, but it was also HALF OFF, price-wise. What can I say - I'm my mother's daughter, and can't pass up a good deal. But then, when I actually started trying to design a pattern for the stuff, it took everything I had not to give up and crawl into the bottom of a bottle. Why? Because, my friends, fancy yarns like these do not take many (probably most) stitch patterns well, and I was also hell-bent on making something with some interest value that wasn't a cowl or a scarf. And while I'll spare you the full details of my tribulations, I will say that I think I came out victorious in the end. This pattern, after all, is well-suited to a fancy fiber, and also grows in a triangle shape so that you will still make something interesting and style-able even if you're not working with a huge amount of yarn.

Yarn: Lang Yarns Ella (38% Cotton, 30% Polyester, 26% Viscose, 6% Nylon; 174 yards [160 meters]/50 grams); #0048 Altrosa - two skeins

Primavera Wrap
A better look at the pattern.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Okay, so let's make a wrappy thing! And with that goal in mind, first cast on 3 stitches loosely. Then work 5 rows in garter stitch, which will make a little tab from which you'll continue. So, without turning your work, continue as follows:

Tab Row: yo, and then pick up 3 stitches along the edge of your garter stitch tab. At this point, you should have 7 stitches on your needle (3 from the end of the tab; one yo, and 3 that you've picked up along the edge of the tab) (oh and if I'm confusing you, just watch the video, below)


Complete the tab row and then we'll begin our set-up rows, as follows:

Set-up Row 1 (wrong side): p4, k3

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Vine Lace Hat

Vine Lace Hat

Sometimes I feel creepy for the amount of time I spend combing Hedwig's new wig (that's my model). Other times, I figure I just feel like the Real Housewives of Atlanta's Kim Zolciak must feel, and think it's high time for me to launch my pop career and have more kids. Wait... where was I going with all this? Oh, right, I treated Hedwig to a new hat this week, and it's a lovely spring-weight design if I do say so myself. Made with an exceedingly simple but pretty lace pattern and a gathered, slouchy top, this hat would look good on just about anyone. Especially if that someone has a spray tan and a wig...

Sizes: adult small (adult medium/large)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash Sport (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #220 Spring Green - two skeins (both sizes)

A closer look at the lace.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpn), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, 3 stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 6 needles

Which brings us to the hat! To begin, then, using your size US 5 circular needle, cast on 112 (120) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *


Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Inside Outside Hat

Inside Outside Hat
pictured in Child Large (I made it with lots of
room to grow for the kid!)

This hat was spawned with a variety of inspirations in mind; first and foremost, of course, I had to consider the yarn that my eldest son fell head-over-heels in love with at the store. And while I'm not usually a huge fan of a purled fabric, I do love the way it looks with a variegated fiber, which gave me the first clue about how to approach this hat. But since I didn't want it to be too basic, I also gave it the small detail of the knit stitches in the decrease to add that extra pop. All in all, I hope you'll appreciate this hat's pinwheel finish and sleek look, and super-appreciate the fact that it's also knit inside out, so you don't actually have to work all those purls!

Sizes: Toddler (Child Small; Child Large; Adult Small; Adult Large)

Yarn: Debbie Bliss Rialto DK Print (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 114 yards [105 meters]/50 grams); #47014  - two skeins (two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two - three skeins)

The pinwheel finish.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat, then! As I mentioned above, this hat will be knit inside out, so that the bulk of the work will be knitting rather than purling. With that in mind, then, and using your size US 5 needle, cast on 96 (100; 104; 112; 120) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, purl roughly 1" (1"; 1.5"; 1.5"; 1.5") and transfer work to your size US 6 circular needle. And now, knit until piece measures roughly 5" (5.5"; 6"; 6.5"; 7") from purled band.

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Pool Party Cowl

Pool Party Cowl
Pool Party Cowl

I got the idea for this cowl from the school pool across the street; although it's painted in a sort of ugly greenish-blueish hue, the lichen that grows along the top of the building elevates the color scheme somehow, and makes the combo quite pretty. I was even going to take a picture of the building from my balcony, for proof. Then I went out there with my big lens and couldn't help but feel like a degenerate for training my camera on the elementary swimming pool, especially since I could see classes going on inside, and I chickened out. So you're just going to have to take my word for it that this cowl is pool party-tastic, and wears the same colors as the building in which my kids will soon learn the crawl stroke. Okay, almost the same colors. There's no question that the green I chose is prettier!

Yarn: Lang Yarns Seta Tweed (75% Silk, 25% Cotton; 109 yards [100 meters]/25 grams); #804.0058  - two skeins (color A), & #804.0044 - one skein (color B)

Pool Party Cowl
A closer view of the pattern.
So pool! So party!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Let's make a cowl then! So, using your size US 5 circular needle and your color A yarn, cast on 110 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll begin our edging pattern in one color as follows:

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Honeycomb Headband

Honeycomb Headband
Honeycomb Headband

The story behind this pattern is simple: I got a request for another headband pattern and then basically fell in love with this yarn. And while the headband has lots going for it - it's thick enough to keep your earsies warm! It's not too vertically stretchy! It looks cool! - I am especially pleased with the way it turned out in this particular fiber. The variegation lines up perfectly with the stitch pattern for a very tidy result.

Yarn: Debbie Bliss Rialto DK Print (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 114 yards [105 meters]/50 grams); #47008 Roma - one skein

Honeycomb Headband
I'm not sure I've ever had a yarn stripe quite this
well before...
Needles: One pair of US 6 needles, one US 7 needle for provisional cast on, and a cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a headband! Using your larger needle, cast on 28 stitches provisionally. Transfer cast on to your size 6 needles. Then, we'll begin our main pattern, which is basically just Aran Honeycomb from page 273 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns and some garter edging, for which we'll need the following notation. Oh, and this pattern is an excellent choice if you're ready to cable without a cable needle as well.

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Mossy Path Mitts

Mossy Path Mitts

I've been noticing a lot of things as I walk around recently; pretty windows, even prettier balconies, and a plethora of semi-indecent carvings and statues. I've also noticed a lot of moss. It creeps between bricks, climbs up walls, and spreads over stones. It was also the inspiration for the slipped stitch color pattern of these lovely, snuggly mitts. :)

Oh, and a big note on the sizing of these bad boys, too: I debated casting on an extra 5 stitches for each size (i.e. instructing to cast on 45 stitches for the smalls instead of 40), but ultimately decided that the sizing is correct as given because, at the very upper end of the size small, I love the snug hug of these mitts. However, if you have any trouble keeping your yarn loose behind your slipped stitches or if you don't want a super snug-fitting mitt, I highly recommend that you knit one size larger than you might otherwise. Same goes if you're making these as a gift - don't make the small unless you've got specific hand dimensions or you're making them for a child, a bird, or a frenemy you want to feel guilty about the time you put into knitting mitts that she simply can't squeeze on.

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium up to 9", and the large goes up to about 9.75")

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash Sport (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #859 Lake Chelan Heather - one skein (color A) & #220 Spring Green - one skein (color B)

A closer look at the mitts.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 6 needles (roughly 26 inches = 4 inches unstretched in pattern)

So let's make some mitts! Using your size US 5 needles and your color A yarn, then, cast on 40 (45; 50) stitches loosely, dividing stitches between three dpns as follows: 15 stitches on your first needle; 10 on your second; and 15 on your third ([15; 15; 15]; [15; 20; 15]). Join in round. Then we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * (k1, p1) twice, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 6 (6; 7) times. Then, transfer work to your size 6 needles. Once that's done, we'll move to our main pattern, as follows:

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Oops I Did It Again Beanie

Oops I Did It Again Beanie

So here's the thing. I had the inspiration for the texture of this hat very organically - proof lies in the picture below - when I was walking near my sons' new school. I was even more excited when I realized that I had actually brought a perfect yarn for the job with me from Wisconsin. So I cast on, got working, and then about halfway through realized that it's basically the same pattern I used in the Belt Welt Hat, except in miniature. Oops. On the plus side, the Oops I Did It Again Beanie is a great study in how yarn weight affects texture, and is also a nice unisex design. So... that's something, right?

Yarn: Three Irish Girls Yarn Inc. Springvale DK (100% Superwash Merino; 270 yards [245 meters]/4 ounces); Tête de fromage - one skein

The pattern. As you can see from the rolled-back brim,
it's pretty on the wrong side as well!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 4; one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 4

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat! Using your circular needles, then, cast on 128 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Oh, and here's an inspirational picture for you in case you're already tired. See how pretty the texture is?

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Float Flutter Fly Scarf

Float Flutter Fly Scarf

I know what you're thinking: Isn't this scarf named for a line in a song in an episode of The Backyardigans? And to that, I say: of course not! What do you think I am, some kind of lunatic? No, I am merely using these three delightfully alliterative words to remark on this scarf's floating ends and fluttering edges, as well as the fact that you'll fly through making this not-too-basic knit and purl design. Any presumed reference to Uniqua, Tasha, Tyrone, and Pablo's quest for a levitating stone is purely circumstantial.

Update as of January 27, 2016: A sharp-eyed commenter brought it to my attention that both my set-up row and my first pattern row were labeled wrong side. Therefore, I've chosen to omit the set-up row from the pattern. If you're halfway through and are lamenting this decision, please don't worry! I highly doubt you will notice the presence or absence of this row when you reach the end of the scarf; you'll be too busy twirling in it to notice. :)

Yarn: Berroco Folio (65% Superfine Alpaca, 35% Rayon; 219 yards [200 meters]/50 grams); #4563 Napa Valley - 2 skeins

A closer look at the knits and the purls.
And a mannequin's armpit.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

And now, it's time to make a scarf! With that in mind, cast on 37 stitches loosely. Then we'll get straight to our pattern, which you'll find below. Note that it's a-okay to pull your yarn tight behind your 5 slipped stitches; this will help form that little ridge in the middle of the scarf.

Row 1 (wrong side): purl

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Lizard People Fingerless Gloves

Lizard People Fingerless Gloves

My husband had just one job with this project: to convince me not to call these mitts the "Lizard People Fingerless Gloves." Obviously, he failed. Luckily, it doesn't matter what I name them, since these fingerless gloves will remain beautifully textured and fun to make either way. So break out your favorite sport weight yarn and get started on a pair of fantastic gloves for all of your lizard friends!

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium up to 8 3/4", and the large goes up to about 9.5")

Yarn: Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8910 Citron - one skein

A closer look at the pattern.
It's lizard-y, no?
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make some mitts! Using your size 5 needles, cast on 40 (44; 48) stitches loosely and then divide among three double-pointed needles as follows: 12 stitches, 16 stitches, 12 stitches (14 stitches, 16 stitches, 14 stitches; 16 stitches, 16 stitches, 16 stitches). Then we'll work a ribbing row as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 6 times (all sizes). Transfer work to your size 6 needles. Then, we'll begin to incorporate a pattern stripe. All sizes can follow the same directions, below:

Row 1: knit

Row 2: knit across first needle, k4, p8, k4, knit across third needle