Showing posts with label cowl. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cowl. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Magentalicious Cowl

Magentalicious Cowl
Magentalicious Cowl

First of all, I don't want to hear anything about my unimaginative name this week - I cycled through at least 847 other options that were significantly worse (including the "Better Than Barney" - named, of course, after the purple dinosaur. Really, I was scraping the bottom of the barrel). So since we're not going to talk about the name, let's just talk about the design, which is incredibly quick-knitting in a super bulky fiber, but still has a little bit of added pizazz with a single dropped stitch design. Oh, and it's also narrower at the back of the neck, so it tucks easily under a jacket.

Yarn: Lang Yarns Malou (70% Alpaca, 20% Nylon, 10% Wool; 71 yards [65 meters]/50 grams); #0166 Magenta - two skeins

Magentalicious Cowl
I forgot to take a super close-up
but here's more detail of the
dropped stitch design.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 15

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 10 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's start by casting on 18 stitches provisionally (I didn't call for a larger needle size for the provisional cast-on because the gauge is already big enough that you may not have larger needles laying around. But remember that you're going to want your provisional stitches to be big enough to get your needle through them when you pick them back up!). Anyway, once that's done we'll knit some set-up rows, as follows. Remember that your 3 slipped stitches are creating a faux i-cord edging so you can pull 'em as tight as you like!

Set-up Row 1 (right side): slip 3 stitches with yarn in back (sl3 wyib), k12, sl3 wyib

Set-up Row 2: purl

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Ridge and Furrow Cowl

Ridge and Furrow Cowl
Ridge and Furrow Cowl

You know how you can walk by the same spot a million times and still not notice what's there? That's exactly what I realized had happened to me when I discovered another local yarn shop, this one just a four minute bus ride from my house. And if that discovery weren't great enough on its own, I discovered that said local yarn shop ALSO has a lovely sale section, which facilitated the pattern for this 100% silk cowl that's both basic and fun (not to say that sale yarn -- or even silk yarn -- is required for your own).

Yarn: Lana Grossa Linea Pura Soloseta (100% Silk; 109 yards [100 meters]/50 grams); #001 Light Gray Mix - 2 skeins

Ridge and Furrow Cowl
Another look at the pattern.
It reminds me of a field!
Needles: One 24" circular needle in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 19 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 8 needles

And with that out of the way, let's make a cowl! First, then, cast on 110 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll move straight to the pattern, which is a basic combination of seed stitch and a yo/decrease combination, and goes like so:

Row 1: * p1, (k1, p1) three times, k3; rep from *

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Divine Drape Cowl

Divine Drape Cowl
Divine Drape Cowl

If this cowl is one thing, it's a summer-to-autumn wardrobe staple that would look great in any color, at virtually any length. And if it's two things, it's also yet another one of my attempts at the absolute perfect cowl design: not too bulky around the back of the neck, but with enough fun in the front to attract some attention. And heck, while we're at it - why not make it THREE things -- or in other words, your next project? ;)

Yarn: Premier Yarns Cotton Fair (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 317 yards [290 meters]/100 grams); #27-09 Lavender - one skein

Divine Drape Cowl
The main stitch pattern. Airy
and pretty, no?
Needles: Straight needles in size US 3, straight needles in size US 4, straight needles in size US 8, and straight needles in size US 5 for provisional cast-on

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 23 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a cowl! Using your size 5 needles and a length of scrap yarn, then, cast on 35 stitches provisionally. Transfer work to your size 4 needles and knit two transition rows, as follows:

Transition Row 1 (wrong side): purl

Transition Row 2: knit

Knit these two transition rows, and then transfer work to your size 3 needles and we'll work a ribbing for a bit, like so:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): p1, * k1, p1; rep from * until you reach the end of the row

Ribbing Row 2: k1, * p1, k1 *

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Carved Diamond Cowl

Carved Diamond Cowl
Carved Diamond Cowl

I would like to tell you something about this cowl, but the Pentatonix video blaring at 1,000 decibels to my right is distracting me slightly (what can I say, my children are obsessed!). So I'll just say, first of all, thank you to the dear friend who mailed me this yarn all the way from Alaska. And then I'll get right to the pattern part, so you can make one of your own!

Yarn: Premier Yarns Cotton Fair (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 317 yards [290 meters]/100 grams); #27-04 Turquoise - one skein

Carved Diamond Cowl
Another view of the pattern.
Quite pretty, no?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 4 (optional but recommended: one 16" circular needle in size US 3 for edging)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 23 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 4 needle, cast on 128 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round (if you're doing your edging in size 3, use that needle instead). Purl five rows around. Switch to your size 4 needle, if you didn't cast on with it, and then we'll continue in Carved Diamond Pattern from page 150 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. You will need the following notation to continue:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Crystal and Pearl Cowl

Crystal and Pearl Cowl

Considering I'm quite pleased by the way this warm-weather cowl turned out, it feels like I should have more to say about it. Still, all I can think is: three colors! lightweight! lace! yay! So, you know, if you want to get excited about a lightweight cowl, try this one! Or not. You know, your choice. :)

Yarn: Maddison Bio Baby (100% Organic Cotton; 197 yards [180 meters]/50 grams); #06 Purple - one skein (color A); #03 Tan - one skein (color B), & #01 White - one skein (color C)

The pattern.
Plus a little corner of my outdoor table.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 3

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches on size US 3 needles

So let's make a cowl! First, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 152 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll move straight to the main pattern, which is a three color adaptation of Crystal and Pearl from page 266 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Row 1: using color A, purl

Row 2: using color A, * k1, (yo, ssk) 3 times, k1; rep from *

Row 3: using color A, knit

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Pomp and Power Cowl

Pomp and Power Cowl

First off: yes, I know it's a weird name! But that's only because, in researching the particular color of yarn I chose, I realized that "pomp and power" is actually a color of purple, and, in my opinion at least, the closest name I could find for this particular shade (go ahead! Google it! I'll be here when you get back!). And, ultimately, it's also not a bad name for this super lightweight, drapey cowl either, especially since the cowl made by knitting sock weight yarn on larger needles and has a very sophisticated look.

Yarn: Maddison Bio Baby (100% Organic Cotton; 197 yards [180 meters]/50 grams); #06 Pomp and Power (I couldn't find an official name, so I'm sticking with the theme here) - one to two skeins, and scrap worsted weight yarn for i-cord (I used a bit of the Lang Yarns Riva (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 115 yards [105 meters]/50 grams); # 0009 Rosa/Grau/Blau I had left over from the Building Bridges Cowl)

The lacing in the back, for reference
Needles: One set of needles in size US 9, two double pointed needles in size US 9 for i-cord

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 27 stitches = 4 inches on size US 3 needles (roughly 18 stitches = 4 inches on size US 9s)

And now that we've got the details out the way, let's move on to the pattern for this delightful lightweight cowl. And let's begin by casting on 19 stitches loosely, and then moving straight to some transition rows, as follows. To work them, we'll need the following notation:

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Building Bridges Cowl

Building Bridges Cowl
Building Bridges Cowl

My main motivation for designing this cowl was simple: I felt plain, ugly, unadulterated guilt. After all, I've hardly changed direction with the seasons, and spring has definitely sprung. So I finally went to the yarn store and found a fiber a bit more appropriate for warmer weather, and came up with a design to match (speaking of the design, it's based on a bridge here in Zürich. Check out the pic below!). I also thought this design might be a nice candidate for the double-wrap for still-chilly days. Or crazy movie theater air conditioning, or the eventual advent of fall...

Yarn: Lang Yarns Riva (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 115 yards [105 meters]/50 grams); # 0009 Rosa/Grau/Blau - three skeins, & scrap yarn (roughly 36" if you wanna get real precise) for holding provisional cast-on and live stitches on other end during blocking

Building Bridges Cowl
A closer view of the pattern.
It looks like an x!
Needles: One pair of needles in size US 7; one pair of needles in size US 8 for provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Which brings us to the patterns! Using your size 8 needles, then, cast on 40 stitches provisionally. Transfer stitches to your size 7 needles and we'll move straight to the main pattern, for which you'll need the following notation:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

lt (left twist): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Pool Party Cowl

Pool Party Cowl
Pool Party Cowl

I got the idea for this cowl from the school pool across the street; although it's painted in a sort of ugly greenish-blueish hue, the lichen that grows along the top of the building elevates the color scheme somehow, and makes the combo quite pretty. I was even going to take a picture of the building from my balcony, for proof. Then I went out there with my big lens and couldn't help but feel like a degenerate for training my camera on the elementary swimming pool, especially since I could see classes going on inside, and I chickened out. So you're just going to have to take my word for it that this cowl is pool party-tastic, and wears the same colors as the building in which my kids will soon learn the crawl stroke. Okay, almost the same colors. There's no question that the green I chose is prettier!

Yarn: Lang Yarns Seta Tweed (75% Silk, 25% Cotton; 109 yards [100 meters]/25 grams); #804.0058  - two skeins (color A), & #804.0044 - one skein (color B)

Pool Party Cowl
A closer view of the pattern.
So pool! So party!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Let's make a cowl then! So, using your size US 5 circular needle and your color A yarn, cast on 110 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll begin our edging pattern in one color as follows:

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Bürkliplatz Cowl

Bürkliplatz Cowl

I've been in Zürich about three weeks now, which has proven to be enough time to both find my favorite grocery store (I love you Central Coop!), and buy and knit up my first Swiss yarn (fine, the yarn is actually Italian. WHAT DO YOU PEOPLE WANT FROM ME??!?!?!). And although I had a myriad of projects to choose from, I went for something that we NEED. Namely, a cowl for my poor freezing husband, since I wouldn't let him move with his last one. It's also my first project that's directly inspired by the city, and the large architectural stones that make up so many of Zürich's buildings. Indeed, that's what the name represents - Bürkliplatz is the tram stop that I got off on to take the picture below, and also near the location at which a nice young woman gave me a puzzled look when she saw me taking a picture of a wall.

Yarn: Sommer Merino 85 (100% Superwash Wool; 93 yards [85 meters]/50 grams); # 131 Charcoal (I made up that color name!) - two skeins

A closer view of the pattern.
Blocked aggressively, the blocks would stretch into
bricks and the architectural inspiration would be more
defined.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 8 (4.5 mm)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches

And now that we've taken care of that, let's make a cowl! First, then, cast on 90 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll move right to the main pattern, which you'll find right after the wall picture that represents the look I was going for with this cowl.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Vaduz Cowl

Vaduz Cowl

First, let me acknowledge the last few pattern-less weeks. It turns out that moving internationally with three children is just as hard as they say it is, especially when you also decide to assemble all of your new furniture by hand as soon as you arrive (thanks, IKEA!). Long story short, I've barely had time to comb my hair, much less knit. But I will say that my new city of Zürich, Switzerland is just as inspiring as I hoped it would be, and I plan to launch a pattern collection with this place in mind. 

Until then, I hope you enjoy a design I made before our move, the Vaduz Cowl. And why'd I call it that? Well, Vaduz is the capital of Switzerland's neighboring Liechtenstein. And since I gave this cowl to my sister, who then helped me with my family's move, and then took a day trip on the train, the cowl made it to the world's sixth-smallest country before I could. With that in mind, may it accompany on your (or your sister's) next adventure as well!!!

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #031 Mostaza - one skein

The cable.
Needles: One pair of size US 11 needles, cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a cowl! First things first, then cast on 32 stitches loosely (you can also use a provisional cast on, if you prefer a seamless look). Then we'll move straight to our main pattern, which combines Staghorn Cable from page 251 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns with some basic knits and purls. So first, we'll define our cables like so:

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Another Brick Cowl

Another Brick Cowl

I created this week's design in response to another user request; specifically, I got feedback that someone was looking for a slipped stitch cowl pattern that used three colors, but in stripes rather than all at once (does that make any sense?). Anyway, I think it took me longer to settle on my color choices than it did on the slipped stitch pattern, especially since this one knits up beautifully and cleanly, without the stitch tugging effect that some such patterns can have. So, basically, if you're in the mood for a fun color project (or a scrap-buster; think what you could do with more colors!), this cowl might be just what you're looking for! :)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8010 Beige - one skein (color A), #9421 Blue Hawaii - one skein (color B), & #8891 Cyan Blue - one skein (color C)

A closer view of the slipped stitch pattern
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6; one 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles 

So let's make a cowl! First, then, using your size 5 needle and your color A yarn, cast on 120 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k2, p2; rep from *

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Winter's Eve Cowl

Winter's Eve Cowl

I've done everything in my power to post one new knitting pattern each Wednesday (something I maintained even through the birth of my youngest!), but this week finally broke me. My next project isn't quiiiiite done. Luckily, I can still share the Winter's Eve Cowl, which I just designed for AllFreeKnitting. You can find the link below. And I promise - to make up for it, next week's project will be a stunner!

Yarn: Lion Brand Yarns Hometown USA (94% Acrylic, 6% Rayon; 64 yards [59 meters]/113 grams); #202 Aspen Tweed – 3 skeins

A closer look at the pattern.
Knits and purls, baby, knits and purls.
Needles: straight needles in size US 13, straight needles in size US 15 for provisional cast on

Notions: tapestry needle

Gauge: 9 stitches = 4 inches on size US 13 needles

To make this little lovely, which uses the Kitchener stitch for a seamless, double-wrapping appearance, you'll actually need to head on over to the AllFreeKnitting website. And the link is right...

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Autumn Rose Cowl

Autumn Rose Cowl

While I love (virtually) all knitting, I especially love designing pieces with a certain person in mind. This cowl was inspired by one of my kids' teachers, who has definitely earned something extra through her kindness and patience despite my kids' occasionally, ahem, * energetic *, behavior. As an added bonus, this cowl's simple design shows off the beauty of the yarn, and is also suitable for beginning knitters or as something to keep your hands occupied during a good movie.

Yarn: Malabrigo Mechita (100% Merino Superwash; 420 yards [385 meters]/100 grams); #862 Piedras – one skein 

It's amazing what you can do with a few knits
and some purls!
Needles: One 16" or 20" circular needle in size US 2

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker


Gauge: 26 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 2 needles


Which brings us to the cowl-making! With that in mind, cast on 140 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll begin our edging rows, as follows:

Edging Rows 1 - 4: * k10, p10; rep from *

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Slipping into Winter Cowl

Slipping into Winter Cowl

It's been a while since I mentioned it, but it's still true: my four-year-old is still obsessed with pink. Therefore, any time I take him to the craft store, I leave with at least one skein of rose-colored yarn. And when he chose this fiber, I decided to pair the pink with a nice blue-green for a double-wrapping, super snuggly cowl. The graphic color pattern and thick yarn make this a fun, reasonably quick knit that's unapologetically snuggle-tastic.

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky (75% Acrylic, 25% Wool; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #029 Pastel Pink - one skein (color A), & #0670 Teal Heather - one skein (color B)
A closer version of the pattern.
As you can see, my slipped stitches
face opposite directions in the different
colors. Grafting, baby.

Needles: One 32" circular needle in size US 10, one 32" or longer circular needle in similar needle size (to hold one half of work for grafting) (also, you don't need this needle if you're going to knit straight through instead of grafting)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! Of course, before we get started, I should mention one thing. Namely, that I made this cowl in two halves and then grafted them together because I wanted the long slipped stitches in contrasting colors to face each other, rather than continue in the same direction (as you can see in the picture above). If you'd rather not graft a whole heck of a lot of stitches together and/or if you prefer to have all of your long slipped stitches oriented in the same direction, I'll give alternate directions for that option below. 

However, no matter which way you're making this thing, you will begin like so: using your 32" circular needle in size US 10 and your color A yarn, cast on 138 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit a few edging rows, like so:

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Dot Knot Cowl

Dot Knot Cowl

I've been on a clean design kick lately, so when I saw this understated stitch pattern I just knew I had to try it. From there, it was just a matter of choosing a yarn and an edging to match (the top edging is also rolled down, which adds a fun touch). One word of caution, however; I wouldn't knit this pattern with a darkly-colored yarn, as the stitch pattern would probably get swallowed up in the hue.

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cotton Rich DK (64% Cotton, 36% Nylon; 135.60 yards [124 meters]/50 grams); #2730 - two skeins

A closer look at the dotty little pattern.
Subtle, but nice!

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! To do it, we'll cast on 114 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll get to our edging stitch, which is Close Stitch from page 94 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. And it goes like so:

Edging Row 1: purl

Edging Row 2: * slip 1 with yarn in back (sl1 wyib), k1; rep from *

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

81-Yard Cowl

81-Yard Cowl

If you're looking for a true one-skein knitting pattern, then you've come to the right place; the 81-Yard Cowl is designed to use, quite literally, one and only one skein of yarn. And the inspiration behind the pattern was the yarn itself - although I bought it a few years ago, I've never been able to find the exact right use for it until I just decided to make something, already! So for all of you out there with one odd skein and no purpose in sight, I encourage you to make an 81-Yard Cowl (or 103-Yard, or 151-Yard, or whatever) of your own. And if your fiber isn't chunky weight, just hit me up in the comments. This pattern is very easy to modify for any yarn you may have on hand!

Yarn: Berroco Versa (50% Cotton, 50% Acrylic; 81 yards [75 meters]/50 grams); #3692 Villa - one skein

A closer look at the ol' pattern.
No, it's not a terribly instructive picture. Sorry.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make this thing! With that in mind, cast on 76 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Since we're basically going to be knitting until we run out of yarn on this thing, we're not going to do any edging or anything. Instead, we'll get straight to the pattern, which is Rickrack Faggoting Stitch from page 260 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. And it goes like so:

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Interrupted Stripe Cowl

Interrupted Stripe Cowl

Sometimes I want to make a fancy-pants project with an intricate stitch pattern and a lot of shaping. And sometimes I just want to make a basic, straightforward cowl while I watch bad television and put up my feet. The Interrupted Stripe Cowl is just such a project, using three colors of worsted weight yarn and nothing more complicated than your basic knit and purl. And the best part is that it still looks (at least a little bit) fancy!

Yarn: Berroco Fuji (38% Silk, 25% Cotton, 22% Rayon, 15% Nylon; 125 yards [115 meters]/50 grams); #9203 Sandy - one skein (color A), #9247 Pacific - one skein (color B), & #9263 Deep Sea - one skein (color C)

A close-up of the stripes. Interrupted.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! Using your color A yarn, then, cast on 110 stitches, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll continue like so: 

Row 1: using color A, knit

Row 2: using color A, purl

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Jardin Cowl

Jardin Cowl

Okay, I've committed a cardinal knitting sin with this cowl. Namely, I've called for two skeins even though I BARELY needed any of the second one to complete it. However, I just couldn't bear to finish this brightly colored beauty early, so I sucked it up and went for the second hank. On the plus side, that means that those of you using a different yarn for the Jardin Cowl will only need about 200 yards (and could probably squeak by at 175 as well). And if you want to use the same yarn, well, you'll face the same choice I did; quit early with one skein or find another use for what's left over (which, let's face it, you'll almost certainly be seeing sooner or later on this site anyway).

Yarn: Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8910 Citron - two skeins

A better look at the cables.
Pretty little things, aren't they?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! Using your circular needle, cast on 148 stitches loosely. Then we'll knit one marker placement row, as follows:

Marker Placement Row: k62, place marker, (p2, k9) twice, p2, place marker, knit until end of round

And once that little beast is done, we'll move straight to our pattern, which incorporates a strip of Round Link Cables from page 132 of Barbara G. Walker's Charted Knitting Designs: A Third Treasury of Knitting Patterns, as well as some decreases for shaping. So first we'll define our terminology, as follows:

round link cable (rlc): slip 6 stitches to cn and hold in front, k3, then slip the middle 3 stitches (of the 9 total) from cn back to left-hand needle; move cn with final 3 stitches to the back of the work; k3 from left-hand needle, then k3 from cn

And then we'll work like so:

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Three Two One Cowl

Three Two One Cowl

If I haven't dated my stash yet, then this project is sure to do it; as far as I can tell, this yarn was discontinued before my first child was even born (but here's a list of suitable replacements). So here's hoping you have a few skeins of your own oldie-but-goodie buried deep in a drawer that you can use to make this lovely cowl, which uses three colors and two patterns to create one fantastic look!

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cotton Rich DK (64% Cotton, 36% Nylon; 135.60 yards [124 meters]/50 grams); #6313 Berry - one skein (color A), #???? unknown color (but it's the middle one in the cowl, and therefore color B), & #6377 Lavender - one skein (color C)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get to this! First, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 120 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll get immediately to the pattern, which goes as follows:

Rows 1 & 2: * (k2, p2) 3 times, (k1, p1) 6 times; rep from *

Rows 3 & 4: * (k2, p2) twice, k2, (p1, k1) 6 times, p2 *

Rows 5 & 6: * (k2, p2) twice, (k1, p1) 6 times, k2, p2 *

Rows 7 & 8: * k2, p2, k2, (p1, k1) 6 times, p2, k2, p2 *

Rows 9 & 10: * k2, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, (k2, p2) twice *

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Honey Cowl

Honey Cowl

I know summer hasn't even technically begun yet, but I figure there are at least a few of you who are already planning for fall. With that in mind, the Honey Cowl is made from a worsted-weight cotton-mix yarn and worked on large needles to give it a little bit more of a relaxed appearance. And while it might be difficult to tell from the pictures, the basketweave pattern that I've chosen for the main design is also a mesh, which gives this design a very unique look. Long story short, this cuddly cowl is perfect for the shoulder seasons, and would work well in most cotton- or acrylic-based worsted weight yarns!

Yarn: Berroco Remix (30% Nylon, 27% Cotton, 24% Acrylic, 10% Silk, 9% Linen; 216 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #3953 Burnt Orange - one skein

A closeup of the basketweave.
Plus some really terrible lighting.
Apologies.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5 (there are a lot of stitches to begin with, so if you don't like knitting on full circulars you might want to start with a 24" or a 20" instead), cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches on size 8 needles

So let's get started! First, then, cast on 119 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then, we'll knit a marker placement/set-up row, as follows:

Marker Placement Row: p16, place marker, p1, k8, p1, place marker, p67, place marker, p1, k8, p1, place marker, purl until end of round

And now, we'll begin incorporating our main pattern, which is Open Basketweave Mesh from page 252 of Barbara G. Walker's Charted Knitting Designs: A Third Treasury of Knitting Patterns, a cable, and some decreases. Oh, and we'll need the following notation:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again. Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

lt (left twist): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)


bc (back cross): slip next 2 stitches to cn and hold in back, k2, k2 from cn

fc (front cross): slip next 2 stitch to cn and hold in front, k2, k2 from cn

And now that that's out of the way, let's proceed as follows: