Glossary

cn: cable needle

dpn(s): double pointed needle(s) 

k: knit

k-tbl: knit through back loop

k2tog: knit two stitches together

k3tog: knit three stitches together

kfb: knit front and back of stitch

m1l: make one left

m1r: make one right

p: purl

p-tbl: purl through back loop

p2sso: pass two slipped stitches over

pfb: purl front and back of stitch

sl: slip

sl 2 knitwise-k1-p2sso: slip 2 knitwise, knit 1, pass two slipped stitches over knit stitch

ssk: slip, slip, knit

st: stitch

wyib: with yarn in back

wyif: with yarn in front
 
yo: yarn over

44 comments:

  1. what does * mean? end? repeat?

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    1. Yup, that's the repeat - anything surrounded by the *'s gets repeated either until the end of the round, or however is specified after the second one. :)

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    2. Any time! I'm always happy to answer questions :)

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    3. What *wyib* means ? Thank you.

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    4. Hi! It means "with yarn in back." I'll add it to the list! :)

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  2. What does " make 1 left " mean

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    1. Hi JoAnne! Just follow the link (here it is again, for your convenience, http://www.twistcollective.com/collection/component/content/article/92-how-to/1046-make-1-left-or-right-m1-m1l-m1r) and the good folks over at Twist Collective can show you! Hopefully one day I'll be able to add more instructional stuff to my own site, but I just don't have the time right now. Anyway, let me know if you have any more questions :) I'm always happy to help.

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    2. Thank you for your quick reply. JoAnne

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    3. Like I said, I'm always happy to help :)

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  3. Hi there, I'm knitting a 'rib and cable hat' and I'm at the decrease but the first row doesn't seem to fit. *p1, k2tog, p1 (k4, p1) twice, ssk* adds up to 17sts and that doesn't go into 80 sts evenly.

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    1. Hi Muriel!

      That row adds up to 16 (14, if you count the k2tog and ssk as 1 stitch apiece) - is it possible you're counting something wrong? I'd love to help more but I'm not sure what else I can say :)

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    2. Isn't ssk count as 3 stitches? Slip, slip, knit.?

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    3. Ah hah! I see your confusion. Nope, ssk is 2 stitches - you slip 1 knitwise, slip the next knitwise, and then insert your lefthand needle through the fronts of the two slipped stitches (which will basically put your right hand needle in knit position) and knit the two stitches together. So just two! Let me know if you have any more questions :)

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    4. Thanks for this description, I was doing it wrong also! That will help me finish my hat. yeah.
      Marie

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    5. Happy to help! And I'll admit it - I did this stitch wrong for a long time too! :)

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  4. Oh it's ok. I didn't realise that the US doesn't do PSSO.

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    1. Super! Let me know if there are any other translation issues then, I guess :)

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  5. Hello, can you explain the diference between k2tog and ssk?

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    1. Hello! The main difference between k2tog and ssk (other than execution) is that a k2tog is a right-leaning decrease, and an ssk is a left-leaning decrease. Or in other words, they mirror each other, which is great for laces and neat decrease lines. Or were you looking for more instructional information? :)

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  6. Hi what is fagotting, I want to knit the slouchy hat bt the slip stitch all the way fm the ribbing has me baffled. I dnt see the longggg slip stitch on the picture

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  7. Hi Judy!

    Faggoting in a stitch pattern in which every stitch is either a yarn over or a decrease. So, in the Super Slouch Hat (which is the one I think you're talking about), the faggoting is the (yo, ssk) stitch. There aren't any slipped stitches in this pattern, however, so I'm a bit confused about the rest of your question. Can you tell me a little bit more about what's tripping you up? :)

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  8. what does the abreviation dpn mean?

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    1. Double pointed needle. I try to define that term in every pattern I use it in - did you see it somewhere where I didn't? I would be happy to go back and fix it! :)

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  9. Hi, im knitting the sailors rib fingerless gloves and I am confused on Gusset row 1. ( Knit until you have 12 stitches left on your first DPN, complete row 3, knit to the end. ) Well there are only 12 stitches how do I complete row three with 12 stitches? Why don't I understand this?

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    1. Hi Marie!

      The first time you knit gusset row 1, you should have 13 stitches on your first needle (or 15 if you're knitting the large size) since you added one stitch on gusset set-up row 2. All this instruction is telling you to do is knit that added stitch, and then proceed in your original pattern for all of your original stitches. When you reach gusset row 1 the next time, you will have 3 extra stitches since you'll add another stitch to your first needle on gusset row 2 and another one on gusset row 4. At that point, then, you'll have to k3 before you have 12 stitches left, and then you'll again proceed in pattern for all original stitches. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  10. Thank you, I finally finished one glove. It took me a while for the light bulb to come on. I wasn't sure I would make it through. Now on to the right glove. The gusset was a new twist for me. I've not mastered it yet, but love practicing.
    Marie

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    1. I understand, sometimes it takes a little while to get the hang of new directions. :) The reason I write the gusset the way I do (rather than writing out each line) is for two reasons, though: 1. because it looks way more complicated when each line is written, which is off-putting, and 2. it works better for multiple sizes. Anyway, I'm glad you sorted it out! I hope the right glove goes perfectly! :)

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  11. I am working on the Little Arrowhead fingerless gloves. I have completed the pattern 10 times and am ready for the gusseting in the thumb. It doesn't quite make sense to me. I have 3 needles with 18 stitches each. row 1: knit until you have 17 stitches left on your first needle. I only have 18 stitches, so do I knit one, they yo and then continue? Row 2: knit until you have 18 stitches left on your first needle, I only have 18 stitches, so I guess I ignore that and continue with the pattern? I guess you are covering all the sizes, as the larger size has more stitches, but I find this part confusing. Thanks

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  12. Guess what, I am so happy that I have figured out this thumb business and your instructions were totally accurate and work. I just needed to try it and count! by the way, I have the Barbara Walker book, but my 1970 (!) edition does not have this stitch. It is a fun stitch and I like learning new, so this whole project is new and I am enjoying it. Many thanks.

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    1. Hi there!

      First, I want to apologize for my delayed response - I've been traveling (and will continue to do so for the remainder of the week - ack!). On the plus side, it seems like you've figured everything out! And you're exactly right that I write my gussets that way to cover all of the sizes and so I don't have to write out every row individually - sometimes it does get confusing, but I still think it's less confusing than a whole mess of instructions for each size (although maybe I'm just crazy). Anyway, let me know if you ever have any more questions! And I love that Barbara Walker book. :) I have all four!

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    2. I just finished one of the Lizard People Fingerless mitts. Rather than having to count stitches for each gusset row, I placed a stitch marker with my 12 stitches that I needed to leave before doing a m1r stitch and it worked great for me. Maybe this would help others also.

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  13. I forgot to say that I also used one after my 12 sts on that needle as well. I really like using stitch markers to show beginnings and endings of gussets and stitch patterns when there are more sts on a needle that are required for the pattern I am working.

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  14. Replies
    1. Hi there! That's a term for short row knitting meaning wrap & turn - my apologies for the fact it's not in the glossary, I embed a link to a short row knitting page in all of patterns where I use it, so I forgot to put it here! Anyway, you can find more information here: http://new.knotions.com/techniques/how-to-knit-short-rows/

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  15. what does cn mean

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    1. Cable needle! I'll add it here though, thanks! :) And let me know if you have any other questions.

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  16. what does wrap and turn mean

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    1. Hi there! I don't personally have a short row tutorial up but here's one I like: https://www.purlsoho.com/create/2008/06/18/short-rows/

      That should tell you what you need to know, and if it doesn't, let me know! :)

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  17. I see where you say it is used to mean short row knitting but what do I have to do

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    1. Hi! Here's a link to one of my favorite tutorials: https://www.purlsoho.com/create/2008/06/18/short-rows/

      Hope that helps! :)

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  18. Do you know of a good site that will teach me how to knit using Dpns? Thank you so much. I love your site. ��

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    1. Hmm... that's a good question (and a technique post I've considered posting!). I usually like Knitty's advice: http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEsummer03/FEATtheresa.html and TECHknitting is great too: http://techknitting.blogspot.ch/2007/04/how-to-avoid-ladders-on-dpns-double.html

      Or are you looking more for a video? :)

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