Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Susan's Scarf

Susan's Scarf
Susan's Scarf

I doubt many of you realize this, but what this scarf represents is actually a tiny miracle; namely, it's the second piece of a hat/scarf set that I designed to go together for the first time, EVER!!! (if you're interested, you can find Susan's Slouch Hat here) But of course you don't have to be interested in the set to enjoy this pattern, partially because, while I made it with only 2 skeins of yarn (roughly 250 yards), as long as you cast on an odd number of stitches and have a rough idea of your gauge, you can make it any size you like! That also means that this pattern is easy to adapt for different gauges of yarn - and please, feel free to hit me up in the comments if you need any extra help!!!

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Pure Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #063 Natural - two to three skeins 

Susan's Scarf
A closer look.
Needles: One 40" or longer circular needle in size US 10, one 40" or longer circular needle in size US 10.5, one 5 or 6 mm crochet hook, 2 lengths of scrap yarn measuring roughly 6' apiece

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 10.5 needles

So let's make a scarf, then! Using your size US 10 circular needle, cast on 189 stitches loosely. Then, we'll work some ribbing, as follows, for the edge of the scarf:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): slip 1 stitch with yarn in front (sl1 wyif), * k1, p1; rep from * until end of round

Ribbing Row 2: sl1 with yarn in back (sl1 wyib), * k1, p1 *

Work ribbing until piece measures between roughly 2.25" and 2.5" and you've just finished a wrong side row (of course this part of the pattern is also adaptable - if you have the yarn and want to make it wider, go to town!). Then, we'll add a bunch of stitches that we'll later use to work the band that runs between the ribbing and the stockinette. Once we add them, we'll simply hold them all on a piece of scrap yarn on the right side of the scarf. So, to that end, work these two transition rows:

Transition Row 1 (right side): * knit front and back of stitch (kfb); rep from * until you have one stitch left in row. On final stitch, knit the front of the stitch, clip the yarn tail (leaving roughly 18" - also, this part is important, don't forget to clip!), then rejoin yarn and knit the back of the final stitch (378 stitches)

For the next row, knit onto your size US 10.5 needle (you're done with your size US 10 one, but it would be unnecessarily difficult to transfer your work without knitting it at the same time). So continue like so, using your larger needle (oh, and you can find a demonstration of this row in the video below):

Transition Row 2: thread your tapestry needle onto your first piece of scrap yarn; then, * p1, transfer next stitch to scrap yarn and hold on right side of work; rep from * until end of round (189 stitches on needle; 189 on scrap yarn) (and yes, you can basically just ignore those extra stitches for now - I'll let you know when we get back to them!)

 

And now that that's done, we'll work in stockinette (with slipped edge stitches, as follows). Or in other words, like so:

Row 1 (right side): sl1 wyib, knit until end of row

Row 2 (wrong side): sl1 wyif, purl until end of row 

Knit rows 1 & 2 until stockinette portion of pattern measures between roughly 2.25" and 2.5" and you've just finished a wrong side row. Transfer work back to your size US 10 needle (or just knit onto it for your first transition row). Then, we'll work more transition rows as follows:

Transition Row 1 (right side): * knit front and back of stitch (kfb); rep from * until you have one stitch left in row. On final stitch, knit the front of the stitch, clip the yarn tail (leaving roughly 18" - also, this part is important, don't forget to clip!), then rejoin yarn and knit the back of the final stitch (378 stitches)

Side note: notice that Transition Row 2 is different from the previous one. You will still be slipping stitches to your scrap yarn, but you'll also work a ribbing rather than stockinette. Which of course I've stated below, but I want to make extra-sure you notice the difference!!!

Transition Row 2: thread your tapestry needle onto your second piece of scrap yarn; then, p1, * transfer next stitch to scrap yarn and hold on right side of work, k1, transfer next stitch to scrap yarn and hold on right side of work, p1; rep from * until end of round (189 stitches on needle; 189 on scrap yarn) (and yes, you can basically just ignore those extra stitches for now - I'll let you know when we get back to them!)

Complete these two transition rows, and then work more ribbing, as follows: 

Ribbing Row 1 (right side): sl1 wyib, * k1, p1 *

Ribbing Row 2: sl1 wyif, * k1, p1 * 

Knit ribbing rows 1 & 2 until ribbing measures roughly the same length as your ribbing on the other side of the scarf and you've just finished a wrong-side row. Bind off loosely in pattern, and then it's time to deal with all of those pesky stitches we added in our two transition row 1s.

So, using your crochet hook and beginning on one of your two sets of stitches, find the end of the row that's NOT the one where you clipped your yarn (you're gonna need that tail when you reach the end, so you don't want to start there!). Then, using your crochet hook, insert the hook through the first looped stitch, pulling scrap yarn out from stitch as you do so. Hook your hook through the second stitch and pull it through the first, again tugging your scrap yarn out at the same time. Continue in this fashion until you reach final stitch, at which point use your crochet hook to pull your yarn tail through the final stitch, and pull tight. Do the same thing with the other row of stitches (and I didn't make a video for this technique for the scarf, but it's identical to the way I finished the hat except for the end, which is easier so I didn't feel the need for a separate video). Anyway, once you finish both of those rows, tuck in ends and block!

Susan's Scarf
Susan's Scarf
Susan's Scarf
Susan's Scarf
Susan's Scarf
Susan's Scarf

6 comments:

  1. I think this pattern was inspired by your several recent train trips. ;-)

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  2. Replies
    1. Yay! Glad you like it!!! If you decide to make it and have questions, let me know! :)

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  3. I'm so incredibly excited to learn how to get the knit stitch divider look! Is there a name for that technique? My daughter wanted boot toppers from a magazine for Christmas. That part was the only thing I couldn't do. Though I faked it very well. Lol
    Love your site. I get bored with long projects too. Thank you for sharing your talent with the rest of us.

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    Replies
    1. Hi! First off, I have no idea if there's a name for the technique - I kind of just made it up, although I'm sure it's been done before! :) And I'm glad to hear you're enjoying my site - please let me know if you ever have any questions!

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