Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag

Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
pictured in size medium

I came up with the idea for this bag for a very simple reason: you can find this style EVERYWHERE in Switzerland. Seriously, what I remember (perhaps incorrectly) as a passing fad in the United States took deep roots in Swiss soil, much like the "Parental Advisory" branded clothing and hats that, while virtually extinct stateside, still roam the Swiss countryside like long-hunted wolves. Wait! What am I talking about? Oh yeah - the bag! They're everywhere here, and they're all the same size: adult. Which gave me the oh-so-clever idea to create a variety of kid sizes, since kids, without question, freakin' love bags. Oh, and if you love the look of this too, you're in luck, since the extra-large size is basically just adult. :)

Sizes: Small (Medium; Large; Extra-Large) (approximate finished dimensions: 6" wide by 7.5" tall [8" x 9.5"; 10" x 11.5", 12" x 13.5"])

Yarn: Patons Grace (100% Mercerized Cotton; 136 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #62628 Fiesta - 2 skeins (2 skeins; 3 skeins; 3 - 4 skeins)

A closer view of the grommet
hole thingamabob. I know, I'm a poet.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 4, one 16" circular needle in size US 5, double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5 for making i-cords, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, 3 stitch markers

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's get this started! To begin this bag, then, we'll start by knitting the two drawstring-holding portions at the top separately and back-and-forth before joining them in the round (so the purled strips at the top that your straps lace through). With that in mind, and using your size US 4 needles, cast on 36 (48; 60; 72) stitches loosely. Then work the following rows:

Row 1 (right side): slip 1 stitch, purl until end of row

Row 2: slip 1 stitch, knit until end of row

Knit rows 1 & 2 five times and then knit row 1 once more (all sizes). Then, clip yarn tail and transfer work to your size US 5 circular needle to resume later. Again, using your size US 4 needles, cast on 36 (48; 60; 72) stitches loosely and work rows 1 & 2 five times and row 1 once more, although this time, when you finish, don't clip the tail. Transfer the work you've just finished to your size 5 needle, next to your other piece, making sure that the right sides (purl sides) are both oriented correctly, and that the piece you've just finished, with the running yarn connected, is lined up on the right-hand needle of your circulars so that you can continue work in the round. At that point, join in round, place row marker, and then knit one row around. Then we'll knit one transition/marker placement row, as follows. Since it's different for the different sizes, I have listed each size's row separately for ease.

Transition/Marker Placement Row (small): [(k2, m1r) twice, k2, p2, k20, place marker, p2, (k2, m1r) twice, k2] twice (80 stitches)
 
Transition/Marker Placement Row (medium): [(k2, m1r) twice, k2, p2, k32, place marker, p2, (k2, m1r) twice, k2] twice (104 stitches)

Transition/Marker Placement Row (large): [(k2, m1r) twice, k2, p2, k44, place marker, p2, (k2, m1r) twice, k2] twice (128 stitches)

Transition/Marker Placement Row (extra-large): [(k2, m1r) twice, k2, p2, k56, place marker, p2, (k2, m1r) twice, k2] twice (152 stitches) 

Knit this transition/marker placement row, and then we'll begin our main pattern, as follows. You will need the following notation, although bear in mind that you can always cable without the cable needle, if you'd prefer:

back cross (bc): slip next two stitches to cn and hold in back; k2; k2 from cn

front cross (fc): slip next two stitches to cn and hold in front; k2; k2 from cn 

Anyway, once you've got that down, we'll continue like so for all sizes:

Row 1: (k8, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, k8) twice

Row 2: (fc, bc, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, fc, bc) twice

Rows 3 - 5: (k8, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, k8) twice

Row 6: (bc, fc, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, bc, fc) twice 

Rows 7 & 8: (k8, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, k8) twice

Knit in pattern until piece measures roughly 6" (8"; 10"; 12") from bottom of purled section and you've just finished row 6 of the pattern. Then we'll work a few finish rows, as follows:

Finish Row 1: [k2, k2tog, (yo) twice, ssk, k2, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, k2, k2tog, (yo) twice, ssk, k2] twice

Finish Row 2: (k8, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, k8) twice, working a (k1, p1) in each double yo

Finish Row 3: (k8, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, k8) twice

Finish Row 4: (fc, bc, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, fc, bc) twice

Finish Rows 5 - 7: (k8, p2, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, p2, k8) twice

Knit finish rows 1 - 7. Then, you can either seam the bottom of the bag by turning it inside out, dividing your stitches in half (these divides should, of course, line up with the ends of the purled sections above), and using a three needle bind off (this is what I did), or you can divide the stitches in half and then graft, or you can simply bind off regularly and seam. In any case, now's the time to bind off and seam the bottom of the bag. Once that's done, finish the purled drawstring-holding sections at the top by whip-stitching the cast-on edge in place (I whip-stitched them to the purls on the wrong-side of the transition row), and then, if desired, whip-stitch around the double yo holes at the bottom of the bag to reinforce them. I whip-stitched both sides of mine together for extra security, but of course if you whip-stitch them separately or simply leave them be you'll be able to hide the strap knots inside of the bag, if you'd like. Whatever you choose to do, once you've done it, tuck in ends and block.

Which brings us to the straps. To make them, use your size US 5 dpns to make two 4-stitch i-cords that are 32" (40"; 48"; 56") long apiece. Tuck in ends and block, if desired. After that's done, you can lace your bag up like you see demonstrated below. And FINALLY, knot ends of i-cords and hand to nearest child.
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
Please don't make fun of my picture.
You have no idea how long it took me to
make this, guys!
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag
Kids' Teensy Treasures Bag

16 comments:

  1. Gretchen, I wouldn't dare make fun of your picture .. I doubt that I could do as well! lol. Thank you, for such a lovely little treasure bag .. can hardly wait to make it. :)

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    1. Thank you! I've been trying to teach myself Adobe Illustrator but it's slow going so this is about the limit of my abilities at this point. But I'm glad it's appreciated! :)

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  2. Actually, your picture is perfect as a visual explanation and without it, I may have had issues putting it all together! Well done, and thank you!

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    1. Oh good! I started trying to figure out how to put it into words and quickly gave up. Actually, now that I think about it, the illustration, although somewhat painful, was probably quicker! :)

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  3. Oh my gosh, this is so cute and cool! I don't have a "kid" but I want to knit one for myself. Do you think if I wanted it larger than the XL I could just add cast on stitches (say 100 instead of 72) and knit the length longer?

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    1. Hi there!

      I measured the adult-sized bags we've bought in the stores with this design (they're made out of like tent material? I dunno.) and they're about 12" wide, which is the finished dimension of the extra-large. Of course you can make it bigger and longer than that too, but you may want to just take the measurement of your lower back and use that to figure out the size to aim for! :) And please, let me know if you need more help!

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  4. Very cool model, too! Love the fountain in the background.

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    1. That's downtown! You'll see it soon.... :)

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  5. You keep coming up with the coolest things; thanks so much for sharing them.

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    1. Glad you like it! I had fun experimenting with this one! :)

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  6. Love this! I envision all my grands having one because they are such a handing thing to have...and I'll make one for my great-grand to grow in to. 😍 Thank you so much!

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    1. Yay! So glad you like it!!! Let me know if you have any questions... :)

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  7. I am a home visit nurse, and I think this might be perfect for stashing my equipment in, if I don't need much. If it works out, I will make some for my co-workers too. Thank you so much for your patterns. You are so talented!

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    1. That's a great idea!!! Glad to hear you like the pattern. :) And let me know if you have any questions!

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