Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Rickrack Braid Hat

Rickrack Braid Hat

The first thing I should mention (before I forget to) is that I designed this hat to match the 81-Yard Cowl. However, I didn't want to go too matchy-matchy, so the hat uses a stripe of stockinette that's two stitches wide rather than the cowl's single stitch. Nevertheless, if made in the same yarn these two items would make for a handsome pair. And an economical one, since this hat uses almost the same yardage as the cowl!!!

Yarn: Schachenmayr smc Boston (70% Acrylic, 30% Virgin Wool; 60 yards [55 meters]/50 grams); #72 Pine - two skeins (I know I just said this hat uses the same yardage as the cowl - that's 'cause I didn't use all of my two skeins!!)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one set of double pointed needles, also in size US 10.5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 64 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row 1: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 1.5" in length. Transfer work to your size US 10.5 circular needle, and then we'll begin our main pattern, which is a variation on Rickrack Faggoting Stitch from page 260 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. And it goes like so:

Row 1: * k1, yo, ssk, k1 * 

Row 2: * k1, k2tog, yo, k1 *

Knit rows 1 & 2 until piece measures roughly 6" - 7" (depending on who you're making it for - stick closer to 6" for a smaller head and 7" for a larger head) and you've just finished row 2 of the pattern. Then we'll work the decrease, as follows:

Decrease Row 1: * k1, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, ssk, k3, yo, ssk, k1 * (56 stitches)

Decrease Row 2: * k1, k2tog, yo, k2, k2tog, ssk, k2, k2tog, yo, k1 * (48 stitches)

You'll probably want to switch to your dpns about now...

Decrease Row 3: * k1, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, ssk, k1, yo, ssk, k1 * (40 stitches)

Decrease Row 4: * k1, k2tog, yo, k2tog, ssk, k2tog, yo, k1 * (32 stitches)

Decrease Row 5: * k2, k2tog, ssk, k2 * (24 stitches)

Decrease Row 6: * k1, k2tog, ssk, k1 * (16 stitches)

Decrease Row 7: * k2tog, ssk * (8 stitches)

Knit decrease rows 1 - 7. Clip yarn tail, thread through remaining 8 stitches, and pull tight. Thread to inside of hat, knot, and tuck in ends.






46 comments:

  1. This is a beautiful hat! If I'm wanting to use up some (heavy) worsted weight yarn for this project, what is the multiple number of stitches I'm looking for in the cast on? Thanks in advance for your guidance!

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    1. (I am pretty confident it's 4, but I am not entirely sure...which is why I'm asking.)

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    2. Hi there!

      Yes, the stitch pattern is in multiples of four, but the decrease is done in multiples of sixteen. If you have a yarn where 80 stitches would work out, that would be perfect for both! If not, I can help you with the decrease, if you need it. :)

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  2. Hi Gretchen. I love this hat but can you help me with some instructions on how to knit it on straight needles?

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    1. Yup! Give me a day, tops, and I'll reply back to you here. :)

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    2. Here goes! As always for patterns I haven't actually knit, please let me know if anything looks fishy! :)

      Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 9 straight needles, then, cast on 66 stitches. Then we'll knit some ribbing, as follows:

      Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): p1, * p1, k2, p1; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left on needles; end p1

      Ribbing Row 2: k1, * k1, p2, k1; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left on needles; end k1

      Knit these two ribbing rows until piece measures roughly 1.5" in length and you’ve just finished row 2 of the pattern. Transfer work to your size US 10.5 needles, and then we'll begin our main pattern. And it goes like so:

      Row 1 (right side): k1, * k1, yo, ssk, k1; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left on needles; end k1

      Row 2: p1, * p1, yo, p2tog, p1; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left on needles; end p1

      Knit rows 1 & 2 until piece measures roughly 6" - 7" (depending on who you're making it for - stick closer to 6" for a smaller head and 7" for a larger head) and you've just finished row 2 of the pattern. Then we'll work the decrease, as follows:

      Decrease Row 1 (right side): k1, * k1, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, ssk, k3, yo, ssk, k1; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left; end k1 (58 stitches)

      Decrease Row 2: p1, * p1, yo, p2tog, p2, p2tog-b, p2, yo, p2tog, p1; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left; end p1 (50 stitches)

      Decrease Row 3: k1, * k1, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, ssk, k1, yo, ssk, k1; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left; end k1 (42 stitches)

      Decrease Row 4: p1, * p1, yo, p2tog, p2tog-b. p2tog, yo, p2tog, p1; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left; end k1 (34 stitches)

      Decrease Row 5: k1, * k2, k2tog, ssk, k2; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left, k1 (26 stitches)

      Decrease Row 6: p1, * p1, p2tog-b, p2tog, p1; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left, p1 (18 stitches)

      Decrease Row 7: k1, * k2tog, ssk; rep from * until you have 1 stitch left, k1 (10 stitches)

      Knit decrease rows 1 - 7. Transfer remaining 10 stitches to a scrap of yarn to hold for later. Seam from bottom of hat, threading seaming thread through final 10 stitches when you’ve reached the top. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. Tuck in ends.

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  3. Thanks heaps. Will let you know how I get on

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  4. Ok I am up to the decreasing. Can I just check that p2tog-b is pearl two together through the back of the loop?

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    1. You've got it! This is kind of a tricky stitch, though - here's a video (don't know if it's the best one, but it is one, at least!). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxQoxCQIe3A

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  5. What weight yarn did you use for this project??

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    1. Hi there!

      It's chunky weight (#5) yarn. And I tag each pattern with this information, so you can look just below the pattern and just above the comments to find it out! :)

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  6. Hi Gretchen
    Love your website.
    I have 2 skeins of the schachenmayr yarn- seems similar to what you have in this pattern, but there's absolutely no stretch to this yarn. Does that seem like the right type yarn? 70% acrylic 30% wool 50g / 60 yards

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    1. Yeah, this yarn wasn't particularly stretchy either. What's the name of the exact yarn? Perhaps I can look it up and see if I have any more insight! :)

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  7. Thanks for your reply! I believe the name is Boston.
    Btw, love your float flutter fly scarf from today. I have 2 skeins folio in 2 diff colors tho- black and blue. Do you think that will work?

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    1. I've totally worked with the Boston! That doesn't have the feel of a natural fiber quite as much as this yarn does, but I think it should work. Maybe gauge the ribbing down one more needle size? And I'm glad you like the scarf! I think it would be super cool to do one half and half. Just knit until you're halfway to your desired length in one color and then switch to the other!!! :)

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  8. Love this hat! I'm a beginner at knitting and would love to give this hat a try. I have alot of gauge 4 worsted yarn, do you think the pattern would work with 80 stitches and size 8 circular needles? Thanks!

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    1. Hi Chantal!

      I think that will be on the snug side. If you're getting roughly 18 stitches per four inches, though, I think 96 stitches would work perfectly!

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    2. Hi there-- Does using size 9 needles (with worsted weight yarn) make a difference? Or do you think I should still do 96 stitches? Thanks for your time!

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    3. Oh man, that's a tough question to answer - different yarns react differently when you gauge up your needle size. In general, however, I think the ribbing especially could get a bit weird if you simply knit it on larger needles, and probably wouldn't have as much stretch as you'd like. My best recommendation would be to knit with the appropriate size needles to give you 18 stitches per inch, and cast on 96 as recommended (of course you can do the ribbing a needle size or two smaller). If you really want to attempt larger needles and the same cast-on number you might get lucky with your yarn, but no guarantees. Good luck! :)

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  9. Hi I'm working on 96 stitches as well. On the decrease how many stitches should you have after the first 2 decrease rows I have 72 Is this right

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    1. Yes, that's exactly right! Let me know if you have any more questions. :)

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    2. Thanks so much I love my hat

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  10. When it says slip slip knit, do you slip the stitches knitwise or purlwise? Thanks!!!

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    1. Hi there!

      The ssk is done with stitches slipped knitwise... here's a link to a video, if you're interested! :) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ohoxYqOT-s

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    2. Thank you so much!!! Just wondering how you know which way to do it as a lot of patterns don't specify. I'm slowly but surely teaching myself to knit and loving it!! Thanks for sharing your patterns, they're beautiful!!!

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    3. The ssk, specifically, is a standard two-to-one, left-leaning decrease, although there are many, many techniques that you just sort of expected to know how to do correctly. As another self-taught knitter, I understand the frustration! For my site, I do have a glossary up top there where I try to define any term that's not defined in the pattern (you should find the link near the top of the page). And I also try to be around to help! :)

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  11. I am in love with your hat and the pattern!! I'm wanting to use a #6 super bulky alpacca/acrylic yarn which I've used before. With other hats I've cast on either 36 or 40 stitches so wondering could you please tell me how to do the decrease? Thank you sooooo much!! Could you pls email me at: callico@telus.net Naomi

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    1. Email does not have my name Naomi at the end! It's just callico@telus.net

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  12. Hi... I have a doubt. I started knitting with 80 stitches on my needle. When the pattern starts, in row 1 somehow I end up with 2 stitches only at the end of the row. I dont know what is the problem but I cannot take the pattern forward from here. Please help.

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    1. my email id is jainbhanu@gmail.com. I am waiting for your reply.

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    2. Hi there!

      Unfortunately, the pattern is a four-stitch pattern (* k1, yo, ssk, k1 *) and 80 is definitely divisible by four, so you probably just made a mistake somewhere! :) Since the pattern has two "k1"s, my best guess is that you accidentally thought you were on the first k1 rather than the last, or vice versa, somewhere earlier along the line. I suggest looking at your work carefully and ripping back. Sorry I don't have an easier answer! :)

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    3. I am actually new to knitting.. still in learning mode.. isn't this row using pattern in groups of 3? Which means I will be able to use 78 stitches fine and 2 will be left? Yo is not using a stitch. K1, ssk and k1 makes 3 stitches. Please correct me if I have understood it wrong.

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    4. You're right that the yo doesn't use a stitch, but it does create one, which makes up for the fact that the ssk uses two (since it's a two-to-one decrease). Therefore if you start with 4 plain knit stitches and work this stitch pattern on them, you will still have 4 at the end since each k1 uses one, the yo creates one, and the ssk turns the remaining two stitches into one. :)

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  13. Hi I've never knitted a hat before. Is this pattern easy for beginner?

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    1. Hi there!

      This isn't the *easiest* possible pattern (that would be basic stockinette!), but it's not terribly difficult either. I think it would be a fine choice for a first! And if you have any trouble with any techniques, you can refer to the videos in this pattern, which I designed as more of a tutorial: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/2015/10/build-your-own-dk-weight-hat.html

      :)

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  14. Hi!
    I'm confused regarding the number of stitches in the main pattern. The ribbing row sequence is 4 stitches, but the main pattern consists of a sequence of 5 (k1, yo, ssk, k1), which is not divisible into 64. Am I reading the sequence wrong?

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    1. Hi there! The extra stitch (the yo) is accommodated for by the decrease, since an ssk reduces the pattern by one stitch. So you should be good! Let me know if you have any other questions. :)

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    2. I finally got it! Your instructional video made it clear. I thought that a yo implied yo+k1, but that's obvi wrong. Thanks!

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    3. Wonderful! Glad you're sorted out and let me know if you have any other questions!!!

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  15. Child you have the patience of a saint!

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    1. Ha! I don't know what prompted you to say that but I'll take it... And hope to continue in the same vein!!!

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  16. This is beautiful!!! I'm NOT good (yet) at knitting in the round - God bless you for the flat pattern!!! Jeannie

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    1. Hi Jeannie!

      Happy to help! :) Although I hope you keep at the circular knitting - it's SO GRATIFYING not to have any wrong side rows!!!!

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