Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Nom Nom Garter Hat

Nom Nom Garter Hat

You may be wondering why this thing is called the Nom Nom Garter Hat. The answer to that question is simple - it's because it will eat up your yarn scraps like "nom nom nom!" Before we get started, however, I should tell you a couple of things - first of all, you need roughly 50 yards each of your two main colors in order to get this hat going. Provided you have that, you can do your accent colors with quite small amounts of any worsted- or dk-weight yarns (or smaller, if you hold two strands together!). Also, I wrote my color combination out here so that you could make the hat with the exact same color scheme, if you wanted. Please, however, feel free to ignore my accent coloring (colors C - J), and do your own instead! If you choose to do this, however, you'll definitely want to pay attention to the length of the stockinette stripe on this hat - it is a better indication of the finished length than the garter stitch. To make the color pop, after all, you'll be blocking the snot out of this thing, and the garter will stretch a LOT.

Oh, and last but not least - I designed this hat back-and-forth, both for my peeps who avoid circular knitting, and because that's the only way to truly take advantage of the garter stitch. If you need help converting the pattern for circular knitting, just ask!

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #1948 Mystic Purple - one skein (color A), #908 Magenta - one skein (color B) & various scrap yarns in worsted & dk weights (colors C - J) - roughly 50 yards total

This is how I kept my colors straight!
My children thought I was working on a cool
art project, at least.
Needles: straight needles in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette, 16 stitches = 4 inches in garter

So let's get started! First, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 82 (90) stitches. Then we'll work the edging rows like so:

Row 1: using color A, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 2: using color C, knit

Row 3: using color C, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 4: using color A, knit

Row 5: using color B, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 6: using color D, knit

Row 7: using color D, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 8: using color B, knit

Row 9: using color A, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 10: using color E, knit

Row 11: using color E, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 12: using color A, knit

Once these 12 rows are done, we'll knit a couple of transition rows, as follows:

Transition Row 1 (wrong side): using color B, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Transition Row 2: using color B, k1, * k3, kfb, k4; rep from * until you have one stitch left in row, k1 (92 stitches (101 stitches))

And once THOSE rows are done, we'll move right to the main pattern, as follows (and yes, it's exactly the same as the edging rows). Remember that I am giving the color variation as seen in the particular hat I made - you are welcome to change it as you see fit!!!

Row 1: using color A, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 2: using color F, knit

Row 3: using color F, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 4: using color A, knit

Row 5: using color B, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 6: using color G, knit

Row 7: using color G, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 8: using color B, knit

Rows 9 - 12: repeat rows 1 - 4, using color H instead of color F

Rows 13 - 16: repeat rows 5 - 8, using color I instead of color G

Rows 17 - 20: repeat rows 1 - 4, using color J instead of color F

Rows 21 - 24: repeat rows 13 - 16

Rows 25 - 28: repeat rows 9 - 12

Rows 28 - 32: repeat rows 5 - 8

And once these 32 rows are done (or once your hat measures roughly 7" - 8" along the stockinette strip), it's time to begin our decrease, which goes as follows:

Decrease Row 1: using color A, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Decrease Row 2: using color F, k1, * k2, ssk, k5 * until you have 1 stitch left in row, k1 (80 stitches (88 stitches)

Decrease Row 3: using color F, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Decrease Row 4: using color A, k1, * k2, ssk, k4 * until you have 1 stitch left in row, k1 (70 stitches (77 stitches))

Decrease Row 5: using color B, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Decrease Row 6: using color E, k1, * k2, ssk, k3 * until you have 1 stitch left in row, k1 (60 stitches (66 stitches))

Decrease Row 7: using color E, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Decrease Row 8: using color B, k1, * k2, ssk, k2 * until you have 1 stitch left in row, k1 (50 stitches (55 stitches))

Decrease Row 9: using color A, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Decrease Row 10: using color D, k1, * k2, ssk, k1 * until you have 1 stitch left in row, k1 (40 stitches (44 stitches))

Decrease Row 11: using color D, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Decrease Row 12: using color A, k1, * k2, ssk * until you have 1 stitch left in row, k1 (30 stitches (33 stitches))

Decrease Row 13: using color B, p2, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Decrease Row 14: using color C, k1, * k1, k2tog * until you have 1 stitch left in row, k1 (20 stitches (22 stitches))

Decrease Row 15: using color C, p2, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Decrease Row 16: using color B, k1, * k2tog * until you have 1 stitch left in row, k1 (12 stitches (13 stitches))

Decrease Row 17: using color B, p1, * p2tog * until you have one stitch left in row, p1 (using color B, p2, * p2tog * until you have one stitch left in row, p1) (7 stitches (8 stitches)) 

Knit decrease rows 1 - 17. Then, using your tapestry needle, thread final 7 (8) stitches onto a scrap of yarn for working later. Block vertically, but not horizontally - you should be stretching your garter fabric out to the same height as the stockinette strip, but not changing the circumference of the hat. Finally, once this little guy is done blocking, seam from bottom of hat, threading seaming yarn through final 7 (8) stitches when you reach them. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. Tuck in ends.






36 comments:

  1. This hat is calling my name. I was wondering what to do with all those scraps of yarn that I can't seem to throw away. Can't remember the last time I knitted on straight needles. I may have to dust them off. Great idea on keeping the colors straight.

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    1. Glad you like it, it was a great way to use up some of my scraps as well! To be fair, though, I didn't actually knit it on straight needles - I just knit it back-and-forth on circulars. Something about straights just makes me feel like a chicken - I avoid them at all costs! :)

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    2. I can't seem to get the "hang" of circular needles, so I'm always happy to find something I can do on straights!! Yay! Although I've a feeling my teens are going to snag this straight off the needles soon as it's done!

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    3. It's always funny how different different peoples' preferences are. :) Anyway, glad you like the pattern, and let me know if you have any questions!!!

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  2. I have so many straight needles, that I have them arranged in a red vase downstairs. No one has ever commented on them. I am going to follow your lead and knit on circulars, too.

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    1. I love the vase idea! I have a bunch too, but they're just buried in a closet somewhere. Your use is much more creative! :)

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  3. Well then, it's official - I AM the only person who loves working on straights (and avoids circs at all costs)! Thanks for the pattern - I love it and it's perfect for all those scraps I have laying around in little, tiny balls (which I keep in a vase) :-)

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    1. Well, it's good to be different! And I'm glad you like the pattern, hopefully it can help you empty your vase. :) Please let me know if you have any questions!!!

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    2. I get requests to convert almost all of my patterns to straight needles so I know there are at least some of you out there! :)

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  4. I love knitting with straight needles too! Thanks for this. Gretchen is it possible to turn any of your circular patterns into patterns for straight needles?

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    1. Hi Sheryl!

      Many of my circular patterns can be adapted for straight needles, and I have already posted adapted patterns in the comments for a few of them. I think it would be easier for you to tell me which patterns you're interested in, and I can help you from there. :)

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    2. Fab I was keen to try the Floral Mesh and Rickrack Braid hats.

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    3. Hi again!

      Unfortunately, I think the Floral Mesh is one that wouldn't translate well without an obvious seam. However, if you were interested in modifying the Floral Mesh Bonnet to a beanie shape for flat knitting I think we could do that instead (http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/2015/06/floral-mesh-bonnet.html). It already has a seam at the back, but that's unavoidable with a back and forth construction.

      And the Rickrack Braid hat would be very easy to modify! If you don't mind leaving me a comment on that pattern, I'll respond to it with modified flat knitting directions. That way if someone else is looking for it they'll find it in the right spot! :)

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    4. That is so great. Unfortunately i have somehow left about seven comments on the Rickrack Braid hat page. That's the problem with using my phone! So if you could delete the repeats that would be great. It's really generous of you to share your patterns and expertise!

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    5. Don't worry, it's not the first time it's happened. I deleted all of your extras! :) And I'll get that pattern to you shortly!

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  5. Hi,I would like to do the slouch hat on circular....but using variegated yarn (to match the doug fur mitties i am currently working on)..my head would explode of I tried keeping track of different colors. Could you please tell me how best to modify this pattern for circular?

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    1. Hi there!

      I have actually already posted an adapted version of the Super Slouch Hat in the comments for that hat. :) It does have a slightly smaller gauge than the Doug Fir Mittens, though, so I recommend either using smaller needles or reducing the number of stitches to make it (or reducing the number of stitches for the band and then adding some back to match the original pattern).

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  6. Hi Gretchen! I want to make this Garter Hat on circulars, and I thought it wouldn't be too tough to figure out, but I'd rather go by your instructions than get stuck and have to wait for them! Also, I'm quite confused by your blocking instructions. Can you help me out, or would I not have to block if I use circs? I want to make this for my 8 yr old grandson and am thinking a small adult size would work.
    Bless you, btw, for sharing your patterns. They're lovely!

    Nana Jill :o)

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    1. Hi Jill!

      I'm happy to help you with this; just give me a day or two as I'm in the middle of a move. :) As far as blocking is concerned - all I was trying to communicate is that you want to make your hat longer, not wider. You may or may not to block it when you make it on circulars, since garter definitely tends to shorten up and the colors are more noticeable when stretched. :)

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    2. Okay, I found a minute! You can find the revised pattern below. As always when I write something I haven't knit, there may be some unforeseen issue. Please let me know if anything looks fishy!

      So let's get started! First, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 80 (88) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the edging rows like so:

      Row 1: using color A, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 2: using color C, knit

      Row 3: using color C, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 4: using color A, knit

      Row 5: using color B, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 6: using color D, knit

      Row 7: using color D, p3, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 8: using color B, knit

      Row 9: using color A, p3, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 10: using color E, knit

      Row 11: using color E, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 12: using color A, knit

      Once these 12 rows are done, we'll knit a couple of transition rows, as follows:

      Transition Row 1: using color B, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Transition Row 2: using color B, * k3, kfb, k4; rep from * (90 stitches (99 stitches))

      And once THOSE rows are done, we'll move right to the main pattern, as follows (and yes, it's exactly the same as the edging rows). Remember that I am giving the color variation as seen in the particular hat I made - you are welcome to change it as you see fit!!!

      Row 1: using color A, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 2: using color F, knit

      Row 3: using color F, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 4: using color A, knit

      Row 5: using color B, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 6: using color G, knit

      Row 7: using color G, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Row 8: using color B, knit

      Rows 9 - 12: repeat rows 1 - 4, using color H instead of color F

      Rows 13 - 16: repeat rows 5 - 8, using color I instead of color G

      Rows 17 - 20: repeat rows 1 - 4, using color J instead of color F

      Rows 21 - 24: repeat rows 13 - 16

      Rows 25 - 28: repeat rows 9 - 12

      Rows 28 - 32: repeat rows 5 - 8

      And once these 32 rows are done (or once your hat measures roughly 7" - 8" along the stockinette strip), it's time to begin our decrease, which goes as follows:

      Decrease Row 1: using color A, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Decrease Row 2: using color F, * k2, ssk, k5 * (80 stitches (88 stitches)

      Decrease Row 3: using color F, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Decrease Row 4: using color A, * k2, ssk, k4 * (70 stitches (77 stitches))

      Decrease Row 5: using color B, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Decrease Row 6: using color E, * k2, ssk, k3 * (60 stitches (66 stitches))

      Decrease Row 7: using color E, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Decrease Row 8: using color B, * k2, ssk, k2 * (50 stitches (55 stitches))

      Decrease Row 9: using color A, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Decrease Row 10: using color D, * k2, ssk, k1 * (40 stitches (44 stitches))

      Decrease Row 11: using color D, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Decrease Row 12: using color A, * k2, ssk * (30 stitches (33 stitches))

      Decrease Row 13: using color B, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Decrease Row 14: using color C, * k1, k2tog * (20 stitches (22 stitches))

      Decrease Row 15: using color C, k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in round, k2

      Decrease Row 16: using color B, * k2tog * (12 stitches (13 stitches))

      Decrease Row 17: using color B, * k2tog * (using color B, k1, * k2tog) (6 stitches (7 stitches))

      Clip yarn tail and thread through remaining 6 (7) stitches. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. Tuck in ends. Block if necessary, stretching fabric to increase length of hat but not circumference.

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  7. Gretchen, You - are amazing to give of your time and energy so selflessly. I speak blessings upon you and your family in the precious name of Jesus! Thank you. I will send a picture when and if I get this done! :o)
    Nana Jill

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    1. Can't wait to see it! And I'm always happy to help. :)

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  8. I absolutely love this hat, but am looking to make it for a child (5-8 ish), and preferably less slouchy and more fitted. How many stitches would you recommend i cast on with and how long should I make it? Thanks for all your help, I just stumbled across your blog and I lov every pattern. I literally want to make 85% of your stuff haha!

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    1. Hi Alyssa!

      I'm glad to hear you're enjoying my site. If you'd like to make a kid-sized version that's less slouchy, I recommend casting on 83 stitches and knitting the first 12 rows on a size US 6 needle rather than 7. Then transfer your work to a size US 7, and skip the transition rows. Knit until the piece measures roughly 5" and then work the decrease. The stitch counts won't match, but the decrease will work nonetheless. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  9. Gretchen, I've been a needle artist for over 60 years and have made everything imaginable in every form of needle and fiber art (except tatting, lost my Great Gramma before she could teach me that last art). I have just found your website and I'm giddy with anticipation over all your patterns. Age and creaky joints sometimes limit just how much knitting or crocheting I can do so I'm looking forward to make A LOT of your designs. I have a question on the Nom Nom Hat. In Tranmsition Row 2, what the heck does KFB mean? I've never seen that stitch instruction before. I don't think it would 'Knit front to back" as that is the standard way to work a knit stitch? Please clarify as I'm stopped at the beginning of this row and really want to get this done and see the results. Ive already moarked about a dozen patterns that I'm going to do before winter hits here in Northern Arizona. Thanks

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    1. Well, Darn, If I had just looked and seen that you have a glossary, I wouldn't have bothered you with a dumb question. I get it now, "Knit front AND back". Duh, that's what old age dopes to you. LOL. Looking forward to making a lot of your things. Have a great day and be safe.

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    2. No worries, I do that kind of stuff all of the time! :) And I could never get mad at a kindly-presented question, either!!!

      Anyway, I hope this pattern turns out well for you. And let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  10. I've just made this for my 12 year old daughter and she loves it. It was a great way to use up all the left over wool. My ten year old now wants one too 😊

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    1. Yay! Glad to hear the hat worked out well for you... And glad I could provide a pattern to eat your scraps and please your daughters!!! :)

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  11. I've just made this hat :) I love it! Thank you for the pattern. I made it in two colours with random size stripes.

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    1. Yay! I'm so glad to hear it!!! And that sounds awesome! :)

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  12. I love this pattern but I'm making it for my sister who has a hard time finding hats. I'm having trouble fixing the pattern for a 26" circumstance.I was thinking of casting on about 130 stitches but if I do would I need to add more rows?

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    1. Hi there!

      First off, is your sister's head 26" around? Because, in that case, I would recommend casting on 98 stitches, or a maximum of 106 so that the hat will fit reasonably snugly around the edge (if you're getting 16 stitches = 4 inches in garter, that is. If you gauge is different then let me know! Also, this is unfortunately a hat where gauge is important, just FYI). Anyway, then you'll add more stitches in the transition row for the slouchy look. And yes, go ahead and knit until the hat measures a bit longer along the stockinette portion when you're doing length - I recommend somewhere between 9 and 10 inches. The nice thing about doing it in garter is that it will have a lot of stretch, so you can block it as big or as small as you need it! :)

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  13. I finished this hat for my husband for Christmas & blocked for the first time. I am so so pleased with it.I used completely different colours: forest & avocado green for the main ones, with burnt orange, oatmeal & chocolate stripes. Thank you for the pattern & for making it seem possible & all the information accessible to those of us who are new at knitting.

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    1. Hi! I'm so glad to hear that your project turned out well; it sounds like you used great colors! :) And I'm glad you're enjoying my website - I certainly try to make my patterns approachable, and I'm also always happy to help.

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