Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Bricklayer's Lace Baby Blanket

Bricklayer's Lace Baby Blanket

The story behind this project is simple: I've reached the age where my friends are starting to have babies, so I've started to knit baby blankets. Therefore, as soon as I knew a friend was pregnant, I began looking for the right fiber at my local yarn store. And I passed this one by for months and months before I finally saw it knit up, and loved the way the stitches looked like rain drops. So I brought it home and found this lovely stitch pattern, which shows off both the yarn and the pattern. And it's a quick knit, since it's chunky and all!

Yarn: James C. Brett Flutterby (100% Supersoft Polyester; 192 yards [175 meters]/100 grams); #B3 Blue - 3 skeins

The pattern. For all the bricklaying
babies out there.

Needles: 32" or longer circular needle in size US 10

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 11 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Okay dudes, are you ready to make a baby blanket? Then let's get started! First, cast on 96 stitches loosely. And then we'll knit the following set-up rows:

Set-up Row 1 (wrong side): knit

Set-up Row 2: knit

Set-up Row 3: knit

Set-up Row 4: knit

And now that that's done, let's get on to our main pattern, which incorporates Bricklayer's Lace from page 214 of Barbara G. Walker's A Fourth Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Row 1 and all odd rows (wrong side): k4, purl until you have four stitches left in row, k4

Row 2: k6, * k2, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, yo, k3; rep from * until you have 6 stitches left in row, k6 

Row 4: k6, * k3, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, k1; rep from * until you have 6 stitches left in row, k6

Row 6: k6, * k4, yo, slip 1-k2tog-psso, yo, k3, yo, ssk; rep from * until you have 6 stitches left in row, k6

Row 8: k5, yo, * ssk, k3, k2tog, yo, k5, yo; rep from * until you have 7 stitches left in row, ssk, k5

Row 10: k6, * yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, yo, k4, k2tog, yo, k1; rep from * until you have 6 stitches left in row, yo, ssk, k4

Row 12: k6, * k1, yo, slip 1-k2tog-psso, yo, k4, k2tog, yo, k2; rep from * until you have 6 stitches left in row, k6 

Knit rows 1 - 12 until piece measures roughly 32" - 36" and you've just finished row 1 of the pattern. Then we'll knit the following edging rows, which mirror those on the other side:

Edging Row 1 (right side): knit

Edging Row 2: knit

Edging Row 3: knit

Edging Row 4: knit

Bind off loosely and tuck in ends. Give to the sweetest baby you can find, and try not to feel too bad when they try to eat it/pull it/twist it/snot on it/do worse things we shouldn't discuss on a knitting website to it.






57 comments:

  1. This is the perfect quick knit, chunky yarn and a size 10. Great pattern for a baby blanket.

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    1. Thanks Mary Lynn! I liked this stitch pattern for the heavier weight, because I thought it still looked reasonably delicate for a baby item. :) Glad you like it too!

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    2. It's really lovely Gretchen. I am however going to forgo the knitted edges for something else. I have a pattern for a sort of pointy edge, like upband down waves. Just going to sit down and write it out. I only need to do top and bottom. Xx

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    3. Pretty! Let me know if you post a picture anywhere when you're done. :)

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  2. Beautiful! What are the finished dimensions in inches, please?

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    1. The blanket ended up being about 38" wide. As far as the length goes - I stopped mine at about 32", but I had plenty of yarn for more inches. :)

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    2. Hi! Was it 38" wide only casting on 96?

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    3. Yup, as long as your gauge is correct! :)

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    4. My calculation comes up with 104.50 stitches for 38" wide?

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    5. The lace pattern spreads a bit more than stockinette. :)

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  3. What did you use as multiple repeats? I have just worsted yarn and it gets a different guage.

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    1. Hi there! It's a 12-stitch repeat, so as long as you cast on an extra multiple of 12 you should be good to go. :) Please let me know if you have any other questions!

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  4. On rows 8 and 10 the instructions state from from * instead of rep from* . What is the
    difference? Thank you for your help.

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    1. Hi there!

      It's just a typo - I'll fix it. :)

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  5. Could you use pointed needles please?

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    1. Do you mean straight needles? The only trouble is that the blanket it quite big to hold on the relatively short length of straights. Of course that doesn't mean you can't try, since it is knit back and forth either way! :)

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    2. Have you ever tried using something called Flexible Knitting Needles? They are straight needles that have a long cable at the end. I use it for all of my blankets, as I find circular needles for a straight project confusing.

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  6. Thank you so much. I just finished making this pattern for my grandson. It is beautiful. Thank you for sharing it.

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    1. Glad you like it!!! I gave this one to a friend who had a baby and am secretly pleased every time I see pictures of him using it in her Facebook feed... so it's functional, too!!! :)

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  7. Hi Gretchen, I like this blanket but have a couple of questions. Is it knitting in the round on the circular needle? I ask because in a previous comment about straight needles you mentioned going back and forth for both types of needles. Are the set-up rows all knitting on a circular needle? Haven't knit much so a bit confused. Thanks, Valerie

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    1. Hi Valerie!

      I knit this on back and forth on circular needles simply because it's much easier to hold a full blanket on a long cord than it is to hold it on a shorter needle. Or in other words - it's not knit in the round, just on circulars! Let me know if you have any other questions. :)

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    2. Thanks Gretchen, I didn't realize this could be done! Just watched a video on you-tube and will get started right away. And thank you far all the patterns you post, I am so enjoying them! Valerie

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    3. That's what's fun about knitting - you can always learn new techniques! :) And I'm glad to hear you're enjoying my patterns - just let me know if you have any more questions!

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  8. Hello, I'm a fairly new knitter, and I'm wondering if the slipped stitch is knitwise or purlwise?

    Thanks!

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    1. Hi Tessa!

      In the slip 1-k2tog-psso it's slipped knitwise. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  9. Hi this might be a silly question but to increase the size of the pattern do I just add another 12 stitches? 96to 108 to 120 etc

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    1. Yes, that's exactly right! Let me know if you have any other questions. :)

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    2. Hmm. I thought that might have been my problem. The pattern works fine on one side but then is all messed up on the other. Have you got any tips on how to figure out where I messed up the pattern��

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    3. Oh man, that sucks! I'm sorry to hear it!!! And while I don't have any foolproof advice, my best tip for lacework patterns like this is to place stitch markers between every pattern repeat. Then you can count your stitches very easily after every row to see if you've missed a yarn over or whatnot, and problems are more immediately apparent! :)

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    4. Hey Gretchen this is exactly what I gave recently started to do because I kept getting distracted. So now I feel vilified (hope that's the correct word) and a little bit clever.

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  10. Thank you so much Im new to this and the help is very appreciated! Where exactly would I place the stich markers in row 2 for example?Row 2: k6, * k2, yo, ssk, k3, k2tog, yo, k3; rep from * until you have 6 stitches left in row, k6 Would it be after the last k3? Just want to get it right, have never used stich marker before =)

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    1. Hi! Yes, I would go ahead and knit the first 6 as well as the first iteration of the pattern and then place the first marker (so, like you said, after the k3). Then place another one after the next k3, etc. You may have to mess with the markers again eventually if they end up in the middle of a decrease (I don't remember with this pattern), but by then you'll have the hang of it. And it really is a good way to keep track!

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  11. Hi great gretchen, What am I doing wrong? In row 2 I knit from*to* and it takes me to ssk , when I should really be knitting the last 6,if I don't do Ssk then I've got 7 stitches to knit?

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    1. Hi there! If you're ending up at the ssk stitch when you have 6 stitches left in the row then my best guess is that something went wrong earlier in the stitch pattern, and you got off track. My next guess is that something went awry either after a yo or a k3 earlier in the row, since those two instructions are repeated in the 12-stitch pattern and it's really easy to get mixed up on where you are. I hate to say this, but my best advice is to rip back the row, and then place stitch markers to give you guidance as to where you are in the pattern - place the first one after you work your first 3 stitches (since that's the border), and then every 12 stitches after that, until you have just 3 stitches left in the row (the other border!). That way you'll be sure that you've completed the full 12-stitch pattern before you begin it again, and it should help you keep track! :)

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  12. Hello Gretchen
    I have read through this pattern and I am not familiar with the abbreviations you have used. I think there is a difference in patterns between the USA & Australia (which is where I am!)
    Could you please provide the guide to the abbreviations. Thanks.
    Denise

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    1. Hi Denise!

      You can find my abbreviations in the glossary page - there's a link at the top, or here: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/p/glossary-of-knitting-terms.html

      Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  13. Hi, I have trouble with written out patterns so I created a chart. I would be happy to email it to you if you would like. I absolutely love this pattern.

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    1. Hi! Thanks, that would be great! :) ballstothewallsknits@gmail.com

      I appreciate it!

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  14. I recently knit this blanket for my niece and made a little hat in matching color. It was so loved by all that I have requests for more blankets exactly like this. Thanks for the pattern - it makes a gorgeous baby blanket!

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  15. Hi, I'm confused with the term "set up rows". Is this just a straight knit, after knitting the set up rows, just continue on with the rest of the pattern, or is it something different. Are we going back and adding to the set up rows? Sorry, confused.

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    1. Hi Dawn!

      The set-up rows are just the garter edging; you should simply complete set-up rows 1-4 and then move on to the pattern rows. Does that help? :)

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  16. Is there a video tutorial for this? I am new to knitting and having a hard time figuring out the abbreviations... It looks so beautiful and I am so excited to try it!

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    1. Hi!

      No, I'm sorry, I don't have a video tutorial at this point. But you can find information about the abbreviations on my glossary page (link above or here: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/p/glossary-of-knitting-terms.html). There are also video tutorials out there for virtually every knitting thing under the sun, and I can point you in the right direction for any specific questions, if you'd like! :)

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  17. The blanket is beautiful, but the baby - now, she is something else... gorgeous!

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    1. I can tell you have discerning taste!!! :)

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  18. Hi! Should I be concerned with baby fingers and toes getting caught in the holes if I use thicker yarn?

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    1. Hi there!

      I think the type of yarn is probably a bigger concern for this than the yarn size - as long as you're using a baby yarn (and not, like, rope, or something else without any stretch) you should be fine! :)

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  19. Thank you, this is gorgeous. Is the lace stitch considered a 12+4 stitch repeat, with an additional 8 stitches for the border? Thank you

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    1. Yes, that's exactly right! :) Let me know if you have any other questions.

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  20. This pattern is beautiful, but it's apparently just not meant to be for me... I tried this pattern about a month ago and had to rip it all out and give up because I couldn't get the lace to come out right, and came back to it tonight. I've spent about 2 hours now knitting and ripping out Row 8, unable to figure out why I keep coming up a stitch short at the end. I have the correct number at the beginning of the row, but by the time I get to the end I have 6 stitches left instead of 7 to do the ssk and edging. Somewhere along the way, my yarn-overs get offset and breaks the lace. I think this pattern is just not meant to be for me, since it doesn't seem to be happening to anyone else. :)

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    1. Hi there!

      First off - ack, I totally understand your frustration - sometimes it seems like a lace pattern will just never come together! That being said, if you're really interested in being able to do this, I suggest a couple of things. First off, before you being row 8, make sure that you still have 96 stitches on your needles, and that you're not missing a yo from row 6. Then, either place markers after every pattern repeat from row 6 (you can tie scraps of yarn onto your needle, or use those opening plastic ring things if you have them) or place them as you're working row 8 to help you find the problem. Just place one marker every time you get to the end of the directions between the *s and make sure you continue to have 12 stitches between each of the markers. This should help you find any missed yo's or pattern goof-ups with less frustration. Good luck! :)

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  21. Howdy,
    Just a quick question, at the end of every row for the 1-12, should you always have 96 stitches?
    ie: At the beginning of row 6 I should have 96 stitches. At the end of row 6 I should have 96 stitches.

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    1. Yes, that is correct - you always want 96! :)

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