Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Minky Mittens

Minky Mittens

I've been plotting another pair of mittens for awhile now. In fact, I've been plotting them for so long that I didn't manage to complete them until our first spring-ish week here in Wisconsin (oops). While my timing is terrible, however, these mittens are not; made with a slip stitch color pattern, they are thick and warm, and can be sized from toddlers to adults. Now I just have to hope my kids don't grow out of them before next winter...

Sizes: Toddler (Child Small; Child Medium; Child Large/Adult Small; Adult Medium; Adult Large)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #1946 Silver Grey - one skein (color A), #810 Teal - one skein (color B for the toddler sized mittens) & #9863 Spring Meadow - one skein (color B for the children's small mittens)

The pattern. Plus an eye! Notice how the variegated color B
yarn changes the look of the mitten.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's do this thang! Using your size 5 needles and your color A yarn, cast on 30 (34; 36; 40; 44; 48) stitches and divide evenly between 3 dpns. Join in round. Then knit the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures 1.5" (1.5"; 1.75"; 2.25"; 2.25"; 2.5"). Then switch to your size 7 needles and knit one row around, still in your color A yarn. And once that's done, we'll work a few more rows before we gusset in the thumb, as follows:

Rows 1 & 2: using color B, * k1, slip 1 with yarn in back (wyib) *

Row 3: using color A, knit

Rows 4 & 5: using color B, * slip 1 wyib, k1 *

Row 6: using color A, knit

Knit rows 1 - 6 once (once; once; twice; twice; twice), and then we'll set up our gusseting rows, as follows:

Set-up Gusset Rows 1 & 2: using color B, * k1, slip 1 wyib * 

Set-up Gusset Row 3: using color A, m1r, place marker, knit until end of round

Set-up Gusset Rows 4 & 5: using color B, k1, slip marker, * slip 1 wyib, k1 *

Set-up Gusset Row 6: using color A, k1, m1r, slip marker, knit across remainder of stitches in row, place marker, m1l

And once you've completed these 6 set-up gusset rows, we'll continue with the main gusset rows, as follows:

Gusset Row 1: using color B, knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, * k1, slip 1 wyib * until you reach next marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

Gusset Row 2: using color B, slip 1, knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, * k1, slip 1 wyib * until you reach next marker, slip marker, knit until end of round (in case you're wondering, slipping that first stitch will help you create a jogless stripe)

Gusset Row 3: using color A, knit until you reach first marker, m1r, slip marker, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, m1l, knit until end of round

Gusset Row 4: using color B, knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, * slip 1 wyib, k1 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

Gusset Row 5: using color B, slip 1, knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, * slip 1 wyib, k1 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

Gusset Row 6: using color A, knit until you reach first marker, m1r, slip marker, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, m1l, knit until end of round

Knit gusset rows 1 - 6 until you've added 9 stitches (11 stitches; 13 stitches; 13 stitches; 15 stitches; 17 stitches) in total and you've just finished gusset row 3 or gusset row 6 of the pattern. Clip both yarn tails and, using a tapestry needle, transfer all added stitches from your first and third dpns to a scrap of yarn to work later. Remove markers. Then, we'll resume the main pattern, beginning with the stitches you have remaining on your first dpn, and joining the mitt back in the round at the thumb break. Please note: if you ended on row 6 of the gusset pattern, you'll begin the following main pattern rows on row 1. If, on the other hand, you ended on gusset row 3, you'll begin the main pattern below beginning at row 4. So let's continue like so:

Rows 1 & 2: using color B, * k1, slip 1 wyib *

Row 3: using color A, knit

Rows 4 & 5: using color B, * slip 1 wyib, k1 *

Row 6: using color A, knit

Knit rows 1 - 6 until piece measures roughly 2.5" (2.75"; 3.25"; 3.5"; 4"; 4.25") from the thumb break and you've just finished row 2 or row 5 of the pattern. Clip the tail of your color B yarn, and knit the following marker placement row:

Marker Placement Row: knit 15 (17; 18; 20; 22; 24) stitches, place marker, knit until end of round

And once that's done, let's move on to the decreases, which go as follows:

Decrease Row 1: ssk, knit until 2 stitches before marker, k2tog, slip marker, ssk, knit until 2 stitches before end of round, k2tog (26 stitches left (30; 32; 36; 40; 44))

Decrease Row 2: knit

Decrease Row 3: ssk, knit until 2 stitches before marker, k2tog, slip marker, ssk, knit until 2 stitches before end of round, k2tog (22 stitches left (26; 28; 32; 36; 40))

Decrease Row 4: knit

Decrease Row 5: (ssk) twice, knit until 4 stitches before marker, (k2tog) twice, slip marker, (ssk) twice, knit until 4 stitches before marker, (k2tog) twice (14 stitches left (18; 20; 24; 28; 32))

If you're knitting sizes toddler, child small, or child medium, do the final decrease row, as follows:

Final Decrease Row for sizes toddler, child small, and child medium: * k2tog * (7 stitches left (9; 10))

Using tapestry needle, thread through final stitches, pull tight, thread to inside of mitten and knot. 

If you're knitting sizes child large/adult small, adult medium, or adult large, continue like so:

Decrease Row 6: knit

Decrease Row 7: (ssk) twice, knit until 4 stitches before marker, (k2tog) twice, slip marker, (ssk) twice, knit until 4 stitches before marker, (k2tog) twice (-- stitches left (--; --; 16; 20; 24))

Final Decrease Row for sizes child large/adult small, adult medium, and adult large: * k2tog * (-- stitches left (--; --; 8; 10; 12)

Using tapestry needle, thread through final stitches, pull tight, thread to inside of mitten and knot. 

Finally, for all sizes, using your size 7 dpns and your color A yarn, pick up your thumb stitches again, taking care not to put a seam where the break in the stitches occurs (where you rejoined your glove in the round after removing the thumb stitches from your dpns). Knit around, picking up one extra stitch at the break, until thumb measures 1.25" (1.5"; 1.75"; 2"; 2.25"; 2.5"). Then knit the following row:

Thumb Decrease Row: * k2tog * 5 stitches (6 stitches; 7 stitches; 7 stitches; 8 stitches; 9 stitches)

Clip yarn tail and, using your tapestry needle, thread through remaining stitches. Pull tight, thread to inside of them, and knot. Tuck in ends. Finally, as with all slipped stitch patterns, you may need to do some stitch-scootching at this point to achieve perfection.

My three-year-old in the toddler size.

My five-year-old in the small children's size





48 comments:

  1. How cool- I just found your post by searching for a mitten pattern on ravelry today- the same day you posted!
    Just wondering, do you know the palm circumference of each mitten size? I'm making mittens for my dad - 9" palm circumference. We live 8hrs apart, so unfortunately I can't have him try them on as I'm knitting.

    Thanks for the pattern :)

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  2. I was going to cast on for Adult Large, but I'm wondering if I'd need to cast on a few extra stitches.

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    1. Hello there!

      It sounds like I picked the right day to post this pattern. :) And the adult large should turn out around 9.5" in palm circumference, which sounds like it would work. If you're concerned that the slipped stitch pattern might narrow your gauge a bit, though, it's very easy to modify this pattern - simply cast on any multiple of 2, and then follow the directions for adult large for the thumb gusset. Adding another for stitches, for instance, would add almost another inch to the palm circumference (and adding another 2 would get you close to 10" around). Please let me know if you have any more questions!

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    2. Whoops! I meant "adding another four stitches," not "for stitches." Guess I should have proofread my response sooner! :)

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  3. These are beautiful!! Thank you for sharing!! I love patterns created by people with young children. They are usually the easiest to understand and best use of time. Thank you again!!! I can't wait to make these for my niece's twins!

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    1. Yay! Glad to hear you like them. And please, let me know if you have any questions. :)

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  4. Gretchen, I like mindless knitting while I watch TV. However, I want to knit these mittens for my two grandchildren. These will take more concentration, but I do not mind. I have knitted complicated projects over the years. Deborah Prather (Sailor Gir)

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    1. I have seen some amazing color combinations and designs for these on Ravely! The possibilities are endless. :)

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  5. Thanks a bunch for this pattern! I just made two pairs for my little girls. They will be perfect for the cold and snow that will soon be coming!
    And I love that you have written the pattern to included so many sizes! Thank you again and again for this beautiful free knitting pattern!!

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    1. I'm so glad that you enjoyed the pattern! My boys are still wearing theirs too. :) And please, let me know if you ever have any questions. I am always happy to help!

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  6. I love the look of the mittens and would like to make a few for my grandkids. Thanks for posting. I would like to know when you slip the stitch, do you slip knitwise or purlwise or does it make a difference?

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    1. Hi there!

      I'm glad to hear you like the pattern. :) And you should slip purlwise; slipping knitwise twists the stitch, which would give a different appearance. Let me know if you have any other questions!

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  7. Lovely pattern, I think I'll try it for my 2.5-year-old. What do you mean by stitch-scooching? Is there any way you could tell me in grams or ounces how much yarn the toddler size takes? I have some yarn leftovers and want to see if I have enough. Thanks!

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    1. Hi there!

      I would love to be more precise on the yarn amount, but I used leftovers too and I'm not quite sure how much it was. It definitely wasn't a lot, though - probably under 30 yards of each color? And by stitch-scootching, all I mean is that slipped stitch patterns can tug stitches out place a little - for instance, sometimes the top stitch in the little two-stitch stacks of each color will get tugged out until they don't really show up any more. To make the stitch pattern most perfect, you can simply use the tip of one of your needles to tug on those stitches until they're visible again. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  8. Looking to make these for my 3 year old son, but not sure if I should do the child small or medium (he's a big boy). Any estimate on the palm width for these two sizes?

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    1. I would probably do the child's small. That should be about 6.8 inches around. You could also cast on enough for the medium, but follow the length directions for the small instead. :)

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  9. I am a beginner in knitting & this is the first time i have taken mittens to knit. can you please explain me in detail about this "Set-up Gusset Row 6: using color A, k1, m1r, slip marker, knit across remainder of stitches in row, place marker, m1l". In this i am confused on which needle i have to "make 1 left".

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    1. Hi there!

      Your m1l will be the very last stitch of your row, so it should occur at the end of needle 3. Let me know if this doesn't clear it up for you, or if you have any more questions! I'm always happy to help. :)

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    2. Thank you so much for helping me the mittens came perfect after that. I knit them for my daughter & she is so happy that she decided to wear them whole day.

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    3. Yay! I'm so glad to hear it. Nothing better than a happy child! :)

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  10. Hi there:
    Thanks for the great pattern. I've knitted one so far and it turned out well. Would you happen to have a pattern for a matching hat? I'd love to make a set. I'm not a very skilled knitter so I need to follow a pattern. Thanks.

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    1. Hi there!

      I'm glad to hear you're enjoying the pattern! And I don't have a hat pattern to match, but I can certainly help you with one in the comments here. What size are you looking to make?

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    2. I would like to make a matching pattern hat in child medium.

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    3. Great! Give me a day or two and I'll post something back. :)

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    4. Hi again! I'm posting the pattern below. You'll notice that I've only given a child small and child large size - that's because hat sizing isn't as finicky as mitten sizing. If you'd like some help choosing a size, let me know!

      Minky Hat

      Sizes: Toddler (Child Small; Child Large/Adult Small; Adult Large)

      Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #1946 Silver Grey - one skein (color A), #810 Teal - one skein (color B for the toddler sized mittens)
      Needles: One 16” circular needle in size US 6, one 16” circular needle in size US 7, and one set of dpns in size US 7
      
      Notions: Tapestry needle

      Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

      Using your size US 6 circular needle and your color A yarn, cast on 88 (96; 104; 112) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then knit the following ribbing row:

      Ribbing Row: using color A, * k1, p1; rep from *

      Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 1.5” (1.5”; 2”; 2”). Transfer work to your size US 7 circular needle. Then, we’ll knit one transition row, like so:

      Transition Row 1: using color A, knit

      And once that’s done, we’ll move to our main pattern, as follows:

      Rows 1 & 2: using color B, * k1, slip 1 wyib *

      Row 3: using color A, knit

      Rows 4 & 5: using color B, * slip 1 wyib, k1 *

      Row 6: using color A, knit

      Knit rows 1 – 6 until hat measures roughly 4.5” (5”; 6”; 7”) and you’ve just finished row 3 or row 6 of the pattern. Clip your color B yarn tail, since you’re done with it. Then work the decrease, as follows. Remember to switch to your dpns once you’re getting ready to drop below 80 stitches.

      Decrease Row 1: * k6, k2tog * (77 stitches (84 stitches; 91 stitches; 98 stitches))

      Decrease Row 2: knit

      Decrease Row 3: * k5, k2tog * (66 stitches (72 stitches; 78 stitches; 84 stitches))

      Decrease Row 4: knit

      Decrease Row 5: * k4, k2tog * (55 stitches (60 stitches; 65 stitches; 70 stitches))

      Decrease Row 6: knit

      Decrease Row 7: * k3, k2tog * (44 stitches (48 stitches; 52 stitches; 56 stitches))

      Decrease Row 8: knit

      Decrease Row 9: * k2, k2tog * (33 stitches (36 stitches; 39 stitches; 42 stitches))

      Decrease Row 10: knit

      Decrease Row 11: * k1, k2tog * (22 stitches (24 stitches; 26 stitches; 28 stitches))

      Decrease Row 12: * k2tog * (11 stitches (12 stitches; 13 stitches; 14 stitches))

      Clip yarn tail, thread through remaining stitches, and pull tight. Thread to inside of hat and knot; tuck in ends.

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    5. Thank you so much for doing this! I cant wait to try it! I will let you know how it turns out when I am done (it might be a while, I'm not the fastest knitter :) )

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    6. No worries, I'm not timing you! :) And let me know if you have any questions!!!

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  11. Love this pattern , I think I've lost it because I can't fathom the abbreviation wyib - sorry

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    1. Glad you like it! And it just means with yarn in back - I'll clarify above. And please, let me know if you have any other questions!!! :)

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  12. Could you tell me if you're using worsted weight or dk yarn or fingering. We don't need the kind of yarn. We need the weight. Thanks

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    1. Hi there! All of my posts are tagged with the weight, right below the pictures but above the comments. Also, I always give the gauge given on the package or make a note if the yarn doesn't live up to the specifications - that information should also help! :) (oh and in this particular case it's worsted)

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  13. I just happened across this pattern while surfing on AllFreeKnitting.com, and I love it! I love slip stitch patterns because they are so easy and look so complicated when they're finished. I can't wait to make these for my grand-nephews for Christmas. Mittens are so quick and useful. Does anyone that has made them have suggestions for color combinations?

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    1. Glad to hear you like the pattern! I love slip stitch stuff too! :) Anyway, I thought I'd point you in the direction of the Ravelry projects page if you're looking for inspiration: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/minky-mittens/people

      I've seen tons of beautiful stuff!!! :)

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  14. I wanted to thank you for the mitten and hat patterns. I've made both in pretty girlie colors but the slipped stitch part of both projects seem a bit tight. This is my first color work project so I don't know what I'm doing wrong. Normally my gauge is on the loose side. Help!

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    1. Hi Kathy!

      Long story short, slipped stitch patterns always end up a bit on the tighter side, and the biggest thing you can do to help that is leave your yarn loose behind your slipped stitches - I usually recommend leaving it as loose as you possibly can, looser than you even think might be right, because I've personally never been able to make it SOOO loose that it becomes a problem, although I'm sure there's someone out there who can. :) It's definitely just one of those techniques that requires practice!!!

      Hope that helps! And let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  15. Hello Gretchen,
    I love this pattern! Could you help me turn this into a scarf? And what kind of selvedges would you recommend to hide the yarn changes?
    Thank you so much :)
    Nina

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    1. Hi Nina!

      Yes, this would make a great scarf! And I would definitely recommend a faux i-cord edging for a slip stitch pattern like this one - you'll be able to hide your weirdness beautifully, and you won't even see your color changes. The only issue with this pattern is that you will have to work with 2 balls of your color B yarn, since you’ll begin with color B on the right side on row 1, end with it at the end of the wrong side after row 2, and then pick up with it at the end of the right side after row 3 (am I making any sense here? You’ll quickly see why you need two balls if I’m not). However, even though you’re using two balls and have more rows between the color changes, the faux i-cord edging will allow you to carry your yarn rather than tucking in ends – just make sure you wrap your color A and color B every time you change colors and you should be good to go!

      So, here's what I would do (and of course you can change your edging if you'd prefer). Oh, and remember that you’ll want to keep your slipped stitches loose behind the main pattern, but that you can tug them tighter for the 3 slipped stitches at either edge.

      Using color A, cast on (whatever even number you'd like) stitches, and then work the edging as follows:

      Edging Row 1 (right side): slip 3 stitches with yarn in back (sl 3 wyib), purl until you have 3 stitches left in row, end sl 3 wyib

      Edging Row 2: p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, end p3

      Knit edging rows 1 & 2 twice, and then knit edging row 1 one more time. Next, purl one row across (this will be a wrong side row, in place of edging row 2). Then we'll begin our main pattern, as follows:

      Row 1 (right side): using color B, sl 3 wyib, k1; then, * k1, sl 1 wyib; rep from * until you have 4 stitches left in row; end k1, sl 3 wyib

      Row 2: using color B, p3, k1; then, * sl 1 stitch with yarn in front (sl 1 wyif), p1; rep from * until you have 4 stitches left in row; end k1, p3

      Row 3: using color A, sl3 wyib, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, end sl3 wyib

      Row 4: using color B, p3, k1; then, * p1, sl 1 stitch with yarn in front (sl 1 wyif); rep from * until you have 4 stitches left in row; end k1, p3

      Row 5: using color B, sl 3 wyib, k1; then, * sl 1 wyib, k1; rep from * until you have 4 stitches left in row; end k1, sl 3 wyib

      Row 6: using color A, purl

      Knit rows 1 – 6 until scarf reaches desired length and you’ve just finished row 6 of the pattern. Then, work edging as follows:

      Edging Row 1 (right side): sl 3 wyib, purl until you have 3 stitches left in row, end sl 3 wyib

      Edging Row 2: p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, end p3

      Knit edging rows 1 & 2 twice, and bind off loosely in pattern!

      Anyway, hope this works for you, and let me know if you have any questions. My baby woke up halfway through typing this, so, while I believe it to be accurate, the child-in-my-lap issue complicates things. :)

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    2. Thank you so much Gretchen! However, I am using circular needles - so why would I need to balls of yarn? Could I not just slide across and knit from whatever side the yarn I need is at?

      Nina

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    3. Hi Nina!

      Yes, using circular needles and sliding is a choice; the only issue you face then is with the faux i-cord border. If you slide instead of using 2 balls of color B, you won't always be able to slip the edge stitches on one side of the fabric or the other - you'll have to alternate between slipping them on the right side and the wrong side. Also, your yarn won't always be in the proper position to snug the edging in, which won't be a huge issue, but may make things slightly less tidy. If this sounds more convenient to you, let me know and I'll revise the pattern. :)

      Oh, and looking into this question for you I realize that I made one error in the pattern above - Row 6 should read "using color A, p3, k1, purl until you have 4 stitches left in row, k1, p3" in order to maintain the one row of seed stitch that separates the i-cord edging from the main pattern (which is necessary for more stitch-slipping/edging reasons, as well). Anyway, let me know what you think! :)

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  16. I knit one of theses mittens and in the end it turned out to be to small for my little one. So, I started a new pair in the next size up, but this time I knit 2 at a time! It worked out really well for me since I tend to get one done and never finish the other. I started on the hat you posted above, but it has taken me so long that now winter is over and my little will probably outgrow it by next winter :(

    But, it all looks beautiful!

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    1. Ah, that's totally my problem! I either don't finish or don't make the season!!! Such is life. :) Anyway, glad to hear it all looks good, at the very least!!!

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  17. I was knitting right along and loving this pattern and then things went wonky setting up my gusset. I am not sure where I went wrong. In gusset row 3 I m1r placed a marker and knit all the way around. Gusset Row 4 & 5 went fine. Gusset row 6 I k1 m1r Knit across to my last stitch placed a marker and m1l. That all seemed to make sense but in

    Gusset row 1 "knit until first marker" is that only 2 stitches?and then 1 knit at the end? Gusset row 2 again is only knitting one at the beginning?
    Gusset row 3 is making one at beginnng and one just after the marker? With jus a stitch to the end??

    Not sure if this makes any sense, unusually confused ��

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  18. Brain Burp over! I ripped it all out and started over, and this time it is as clear as can be. You can disregard the previous rambling :-)

    Thanks for the great pattern.

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    1. Ha! No worries; I started reading your first comment and then skipped right here. Glad you sorted everything out! :)

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  19. I love this mitten pattern! It's so easy, yet looks so complicated. One question tho: when you're finishing the two color pattern, just before you clip the tail of your color B yarn, when you say, "...and you've just finished row 1 or row 4 of the pattern.", shouldn't it say row 2 or row 5? Otherwise color B is a different size. Next I'm going to try the matching hat! Thanks for sharing!!

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    1. Yes, you're totally right! Even funnier - I've seen many finished pairs of these mittens and I'm not sure anyone else has noticed! Anyway, I'll fix it. Glad you like it! :)

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