Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Iris Bloom Bonnet

Iris Bloom Bonnet

First and foremost: yes, this yarn is divine. Simply heavenly. Gorgeous, lovely to knit, and beautifully variegated. But even if you don't have or can't find this particular fiber, you're in luck, because I have a sneaking suspicion that this super fun hat would look great in almost any worsted weight yarn. And if that's not incentive enough to make this hat, then consider this: I actually wrote up two patterns for this little beauty - one version that includes knitting in the round, and one that's made entirely on straight needles. Both begin in the same way, below. 

Note as of 11/24/15: This hat fits like an adult small. I have adapted the in-the-round version of the pattern for an adult large in the comments below. :)

Yarn: Malabrigo Rios (100% Merino Superwash; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #416 Indiecita - one skein

This stitch pattern makes me wanna say "yeah!"
My kids would be so embarrassed.

Needles: One set of straight needles in size US 5, one set of straight needles in size US 7, one 16" circular needle in size US 7, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7 (if you're knitting it entirely on straight needles, you don't need the circulars or dpns)

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's get started! For either version of this hat, we'll be working from the brim of the piece, and we'll begin by working back and forth rather than in the round. As such, using your straight needles in size US 5, cast on 118 stitches loosely. Then work the following rows:

Edging Row 1 (wrong side): p2, * k2, p2; rep from *

Edging Row 2: k2, * p2, k2 * 

Knit rows 1 & 2 until the piece measures just over 1" and you've just finished Edging Row 1. Then we'll knit one marker placement row, as follows:

Marker Placement Row (right side): k2, (p2, k2) 4 times, place marker, (p2, k2) 20 times, p2, place marker, k2, * p2, k2 * until end of row

Complete this marker placement row and switch to your straight size US 7 needles. Then, we'll begin the main pattern, which is Knit-Twist Lattice from page 149 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. To do it, you'll need the following notation:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

lt (left twist): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)

And once you've got that down, we'll proceed like so:

Row 1 and all odd rows (wrong side): purl, slipping extra markers when you come to them

Row 2: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (114 stitches)

Row 4: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (110 stitches)

Row 6: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (106 stitches)

Row 8: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (104 stitches)

Row 10: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k3, * rt, lt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker, rt, lt, k3, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (102 stitches)

Row 12: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k2, * rt, k2, lt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (100 stitches)

Row 14: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k1, * rt, k4, lt * until you're 1 stitch before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (98 stitches)

Row 16: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k8, * lt, k6 * until you're 2 stitches before second marker, k2, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (96 stitches)

Knit rows 1 - 16. At this point, our pattern diverges - first, I will give instructions for how to proceed with this hat in the round. After that, you'll find instructions for finishing it up on straight needles. So, first, the in the round version:

Now that we've finished these 16 rows, you should be about to begin a wrong side row. Instead of doing that, however, we're going to join this bad boy in the round. With that in mind, transfer work to your 16" circular needle in size US 7, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll continue like so:

Row 1 and all odd rows: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

Row 2: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 4: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 6: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 8: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 10: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * rt, lt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker, rt, lt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 12: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * rt, k2, lt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 14: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * rt, k4, lt * until you're 1 stitch before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 16: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k8, * lt, k6 * until you're 2 stitches before second marker, k2, slip marker, knit until end of round

Knit rows 1 - 16, and then knit row 1 again, removing extra markers when you come to them. Now it's time to begin the decrease portion of the hat, which goes as follows:

Row 1: knit

Row 2: * k10, k2tog * (88 stitches)

Rows 3 & 4: knit

Row 5: * k9, k2tog * (80 stitches)

Row 6: knit

Row 7: * k8, k2tog * (72 stitches)

Row 8: knit

You will probably want to switch to your dpns about now...

Row 9: * k7, k2tog * (64 stitches)

Row 10: * k6, k2tog * (56 stitches)

Row 11: * k5, k2tog * (48 stitches)

Row 12: * k4, k2tog * (40 stitches)

Row 13: * k3, k2tog * (32 stitches)

Row 14: * k2, k2tog * (24 stitches)

Row 15: * k1, k2tog * (16 stitches)

Row 16: * k2tog * (8 stitches)

Knit rows 1 - 16, clip your yarn tail, and thread through final 8 stitches. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. And now skip to the verrrrrry end of the post (right above the pictures), for the last bit of instructions. And while you in-the-round knitters are doing that, I'll finish up with the straight needle knitters. So if you're working on straight needles, pick up here!

Last I left you, you had just finished knitting 16 rows in pattern with decreases. You're going to be continuing in much the same fashion at this point, except without the decreases. So let's proceed like so:

Row 1 and all wrong side rows: purl, slipping extra markers when you come to them

Row 2: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 4: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 6: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 8: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 10: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * rt, lt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker, rt, lt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 12: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * rt, k2, lt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 14: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * rt, k4, lt * until you're 1 stitch before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

Row 16: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k8, * lt, k6 * until you're 2 stitches before second marker, k2, slip marker, knit until end of round

Knit rows 1 - 16 and then knit row 1 again, removing extra markers when you work it. Now it's time to begin the decrease portion of the hat, which goes as follows:

Row 1 (right side): knit

Row 2: * p2tog, p10 * (88 stitches)

Row 3: knit

Row 4: purl

Row 5: * k9, k2tog * (80 stitches)

Row 6: purl

Row 7: * k8, k2tog * (72 stitches)

Row 8: purl

Row 9: * k7, k2tog * (64 stitches)

Row 10: * p2tog, p6 * (56 stitches)

Row 11: * k5, k2tog * (48 stitches)

Row 12: * p2tog, p4 * (40 stitches)

Row 13: * k3, k2tog * (32 stitches)

Row 14: * p2tog, p2 * (24 stitches)

Row 15: * k1, k2tog * (16 stitches)

Row 16: * p2tog * (8 stitches)

Knit decrease rows 1 - 16, and then thread final 8 stitches to a scrap of yarn to hold for later. Beginning from where you stopped doing decreases in the original pattern (and where the in-the-round knitters switched to the round), seam hat. When you reach the top, pull seaming thread through final 8 stitches and pull tight. Thread to inside of hat and knot.

And now, for both in-the-round and straight needle knitters, we'll wrap up like so:

Make 2 roughly 6" yarn tassels (instructions here) and attach to bottom corners of hat. Tuck in ends. Finally, if you completed this hat in the round, you may want to knot together the two stitches where you joined this hat in the round - although it should be fine structurally either way, knotting them will prevent them from pulling apart when this hat is worn. And let's face it - with a hat this cute, you're going to be wearing it a LOT.






167 comments:

  1. Love this! Will have to give it a try. :)

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    1. Glad to hear it! It looks very nice on a real head, too! :)

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    2. Hie Gretchen, thanks for the wonderful pattern, all the way from South Africa, I found your pattern and just finished knitting it, left with putting the tassels, how can I upload pictures for you...thanks again

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    3. Hi there!

      So glad to hear that you like the pattern, I'd love to see the finished result! The easiest ways to get me pictures are either by email (ballstothewallsknits@gmail.com), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/ballstothewallsknits), or tagging me on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/ballstothewallsknits/). I can't wait to see your project!!!

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    4. Thank you for a wonderful pattern, I will send you a pic very soon.

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    5. Oooh, wonderful! Glad it turned out well, and I'll keep my eyes out for the pic. :)

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  2. Looks lovely and can't wait to investigate stash for appropriate yarn.
    Thanks for a wonderful start to the day and makes my knitting fingers itch to begin.
    Lynne

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    1. Hi Lynne!

      Glad to hear you like it! And I hope you have something perfect in your stash. :)

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  3. This one is so adorable. You never cease to amaze me.

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    1. Thanks TerriSue! I knit this one for someone in particular, which always makes it fun. And helps me come up with new ideas!

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  4. Thank you so much for this beautiful pattern....Diane

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    1. You are very welcome! And I'm glad you like it! :)

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  5. This one is so original! I might have to try it! Or have you knit one for me?

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  6. Here! here! yes, that yarn is gorgeous.
    Great choice of pattern in which to use it.
    Cheers, Anita.

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    1. Thanks Anita!

      I pretty much want to go buy every colorway they have at the store! I won't, but I may have to design a few more patterns with it. :)

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  7. Thank you for this great pattern. It was my first try at the "twist" stitch and it turned out fine. Thanks again!

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    1. Glad to hear it! Twisted stitches can be super fun... so I'm glad your first attempt went well. :)

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  8. Question: On Marker Placement Row, I end up with markers placed asymetrically--10 stitches - marker - 82 stiches - marker - 26 stitches.
    Is this correct? Am I reading the directions correctly?

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  9. Duh! I just checked my math and I see what I was doing wrong. should be 18 - 82 - 18. Sorry for the dumb question.

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    1. No worries! I'm always happy to answer questions (and I love it when people figure out their own answers!). :) Let me know if you have any more!

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    2. shouldn't there be 24 sts on each side of the bonnet? how can it be 18 when the directions say: Marker Placement Row (right side): k2, (p2, k2) 4 times, place marker, 6x4=24

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    3. Hi there! The first k2 isn't repeated, only the directions in parentheses. So you're knitting 2, then doing the (p2, k2) four times. Let me know if you have any more questions! :)

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    4. Thanks Gretchen, it's funny how I see the parentheses and ignore it! Thus creating my problem! I'll post a picture of the bonnet on Ravelry when it's competed, a gift for my cousin.

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    5. Sounds good! Let me know if you have any other questions. :)

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  10. Gretchen, I'm currently working on this pattern on straight needles and I've just finished up row 5. As I was doing row 5, I noticed I have 3 extra stitches so I came off of row 4 with 113 sts instead of 110. Is there a way I can decrease that you recommend so I won't end up messing the whole bonnet?

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    1. Hi there!

      It sounds like you just missed a couple of the decreases. :) If you don't want to rip back, then I suggest knitting row 6 as written. Then, figure out which side of the bonnet has 2 of the extra stitches and which one has 1 extra stitch. These should be between the ends of the work and the stitch markers, not in the middle section. On the end with the two extra stitches, you're going to want to p2tog, purl until you have 2 stitches left in section, and p2tog-b (purl 2 together through back loops). On the end with the one extra stitch, I would probably go ahead and p2tog at the beginning and then purl the rest. Does that help? :)

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    2. That does make sense but my three stitches seem to be in the middle, like 16-79-15.

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    3. Hmm... That's much more mysterious! The first issue is probably that you only have 79 stitches in the middle - you should always have 82 between your two markers, since all the decreases occur outside the markers and the stitch pattern keeps a constant number of stitches. My best guess is that you accidentally completed a twist as a decrease, or that you stuck a few of your decreases between your markers by mistake. Of course, with 82 in the middle and 110 as the desired stitch count, that also means that you should have 14 on each of the end portions. This makes me think that maybe you did just put your decreases on the wrong sides of the markers. Did everything line up when you knit row 4? Anyway, I'm not sure what else I could say that might help. Unfortunately, it sounds like you might have to rip back. If you'd like, you can also try to email me a good photo of your work and I can see if I spot anything. It's ballstothewallsknits@gmail.com, if you go that route. :)

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    4. Ripping ferreted out the culprit: a botched twist. Everything lined up when I went back.

      ...now that my coworkers can resume their gaze from across the break room as I continue this bonnet on my lunch hour (or pull a Wilson and peek over their cubicle wall when we hit a slow spell between calls), all is well. Thanks! :D

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    5. Wonderful! Glad you found it. :) Sometimes those twists just don't go as planned!!!

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  11. Hi, I love this hat, I love all your beautiful pieces! I had trouble with this one. I made it with dk weight. which is only a but thinner. it's 258 yes instead of 210 for 100 grams. I did the gauge and it looked fine. but maybe I didn't do it right. My hat is beautiful, but tiny like for a toddler.... could I had a few more x's hod can I fix this. I just bought a fair bit of sport weight or dk weight wools. Also, could you please post a pattern for a boys sweater ? I see you have boys and I have a almost six yr old son. I would love a great sweater pattern in the round. Thanks Becca

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    1. Hi Becca!

      Yeah, I can imagine that this hat might turn out pretty small in dk weight. :) You could always add 16 stitches to your middle section and then make the hat basically as written - the only thing that would change would be your stitch count on your decrease (although the decrease itself would be identical). And I will keep your request for a boys' sweater in mind (I have a 6-year-old myself!), but I probably won't have time for it for awhile. Things are pretty hectic, which is why I usually stick to smaller projects! :)

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    2. Wow! You always reply so quick!! I love it! could I add 32? is each pattern piece 16? I will try to find some worsted wool soon. I never have the right stuff around! so frustrating. I can't find the right stuff for your adorable boys hat the red one full around head and neck. I'm looking. I either find even more bulky or too thin.

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    3. I try to keep on top of things! :) And yes, the pattern repeat is 16, although I just looked at my previous response and realized that I'm wrong - you would have to work the decrease slightly differently since I wrote it as a multiple of 12 stitches, not 8. If you add 16 stitches, add two decrease rows to the beginning of the decrease as follows:

      Row 1:* k12, k2tog *
      Row 2: * k1, k2tog *

      Then you should be able to pick up with the remainder of the decrease. And if you add 32 stitches, add these rows to the beginning:

      Row 1: * k14, k2tog *
      Row 2: * k13, k2tog *
      Row 3:* k12, k2tog *
      Row 4: * k1, k2tog *

      As far as the other hat is concerned - I understand your frustration in not finding the right yarn, but you could always order the Plymouth Encore Chunky. They have a huge selection of it at yarn.com! :)

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    4. Hi! Sorry to ask, but should that really be a *k1, k2tog* on row 4? Seeing as the main pattern starts with a *k10, k2tog*, shouldn't it be a *k11, k2tog*? (Eleven instead of one)
      Also, these are supposed to be separated by plain knit rows, right?

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    5. On no you're totally right, it's a typo! And yes, go ahead and put plain knit rows between them (then you don't *have* to include all of the plain knit rows at the remainder of the decrease, but it's up to you. You can play it by ear!!!). :)

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    6. Thank you! I assumed that it said k11, and just knit away! :) I had two plain rounds before the first decrease round, and added 3 plain rounds after the first decrease, 2 plain rows after the next two, 1 plain row after the next two again, and then knit the rest of them every round. It worked well.
      I also modified it a bit to be slightly deeper by joining the work ten rows after the pattern told me to, and extending the lattice pattern for another eight rounds. I used a slightly thinner yarn than you did and wanted to compensate for that, and also wanted a slightly more slouchy hat with room for a small hair bun, since I always wear my hair up in the winter. If you want to see the result (and see my mods written up) I'm aviganavigatrix on Ravelry. Thanks for a great pattern!

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    7. That sounds amazing, I'm so glad it worked out well! And I will do my best to check out your Ravelry pictures - thanks for sharing!!! :)

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  12. I'm so blown away by all your creations!! I love them!! Thank you for your page, website, whatever this is called. It's the best��

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    1. Thank you! I'm so glad you're enjoying it. :) I have a lot of fun making them!

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  13. Hello, thank you very much for this really exceptional hat pattern! How could it be made for children from 2 years and above? I would very much appreciate, if you help us!!! Thank you very much, Charis

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    1. Hi Charis!

      Are you hoping to make it in the round or back and forth? I can help you with a modified pattern if you let me know! :)

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    2. Thank you so much for your immediate reply. I'm so sorry I cannot understand what you exactly mean by "in the round or back and forth". Maybe you mean knitting with circular or straight needles? If it is, I prefer working with straight ones. Any way, I would extremely appreciate your help with a modified pattern. Thank you so much again!!!

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    3. Yes, I meant circulars or straights. :) And you can find the revised pattern below. Of course, I haven't knit it, so please let me know if there are any problems! Oh, and I had to post it in two separate comments, since it's too big!

      Using your straight needles in size US 5, cast on 110 stitches loosely. Then work the following rows:

      Edging Row 1 (wrong side): p2, * k2, p2; rep from *

      Edging Row 2: k2, * p2, k2 *

      Knit rows 1 & 2 until the piece measures just over 1" and you've just finished row 1 of the pattern. Then we'll knit one marker placement row, as follows:

      Marker Placement Row (right side): k2, (p2, k2) 4 times, place marker, (p2, k2) 18 times, p2, place marker, k2, * p2, k2 * until end of row

      Complete this marker placement row and switch to your straight size US 7 needles. Then, we'll begin the main pattern, like so:

      Row 1 and all odd rows (wrong side): purl, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Row 2: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (114 stitches)

      Row 4: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (110 stitches)

      Row 6: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (106 stitches)

      Row 8: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (104 stitches)

      Row 10: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k3, * rt, lt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker, rt, lt, k3, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (102 stitches)

      Row 12: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k2, * rt, k2, lt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (100 stitches)

      Row 14: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k1, * rt, k4, lt * until you're 1 stitch before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (98 stitches)

      Row 16: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k8, * lt, k6 * until you're 2 stitches before second marker, k2, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (96 stitches)

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    4. Knit rows 1 - 16. Now you’re going to be continuing in pattern, except without the decreases, like so:

      Row 1 and all wrong side rows: purl, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Row 2: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 4: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 6: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 8: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Knit rows 1 - 8 and then knit row 1 again, removing extra markers when you work it. Now it's time to begin the decrease portion of the hat, which goes as follows:

      Row 1 (right side): knit

      Row 2: purl

      Row 3: * k9, k2tog * (80 stitches)

      Row 4: purl

      Row 5: * k8, k2tog * (72 stitches)

      Row 6: purl

      Row 7: * k7, k2tog * (64 stitches)

      Row 8: * p2tog, p6 * (56 stitches)

      Row 9: * k5, k2tog * (48 stitches)

      Row 10: * p2tog, p4 * (40 stitches)

      Row 11: * k3, k2tog * (32 stitches)

      Row 12: * p2tog, p2 * (24 stitches)

      Row 13: * k1, k2tog * (16 stitches)

      Row 14: * p2tog * (8 stitches)

      Knit decrease rows 1 - 14, and then thread final 8 stitches to a scrap of yarn to hold for later. Beginning from where you stopped doing decreases in the original pattern (and where the in-the-round knitters switched to the round), seam hat. When you reach the top, pull seaming thread through final 8 stitches and pull tight. Thread to inside of hat and knot.

      Finally, make 2 roughly 6" yarn tassels and attach to bottom corners of hat. Tuck in ends.

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    5. Thank you so much, dear Gretchen!!! You are so kind!!! i'm going to knit two (different colour) for my twin grand daughters. They are two years old and I have knitted a lot of nice things for them. I live in Athens, Greece and they live in London. So, now it's my greatest pleasure to prepare a parcel with so many nice knits and books in greek for them!! Thank you very much and I wish all the best to you and your family. Lots of love, Charis

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    6. Hi Charis! I hope this pattern works well for you. :) I can only imagine how cute your granddaughters will be in them! And I went to Athens once, over Christmas. Everything was closed so I sat in my hotel room watching music videos. Next time I go I'm hoping to make it to the islands (and I won't go over Christmas)!!!

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    7. To be honest, Christmas is not the right time to visit Greece. It's November and the temperature is still about 24-25 degrees here in Athens! But in summer, or spring is ideal everywhere and especially on the islands.

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  14. My name is Templa ....for some reason couldnt comment using my account...Getting ready to jump in to this project... its beautiful! And going to be great Christmas gifts. I hope I don't end up with more questions than this ...but on this pictured hat I love the tassles. Is there anyway to guesstimate how much yarn it took to make them that big? Or how many times it was wrapped around the cardboard? Any help would be great!

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    1. Hi Templa!

      In my tassel tutorial I wrapped the yarn 30 times, and that one turned out slightly less full, and was made with bulkier yarn. So I would guess... 40 - 50 times for this one? As far as how much yarn it takes, that's easier! These are roughly 6" tassels, so one wrap takes about 12". Therefore, each tassel requires 13 - 17 yards of yarn, more or less. :)

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    2. You're a gem!! Thanks so much!!

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    3. Ok....super excited!! I did mine in a pink and green and brown variegated yarn from Caron simply soft.....it's so adorable. ..I wanted to post a pic but I can't :( anywho I did a tiny revision.....when finishing....instead of holding your 8 stitches at the top and sewing up....instead i pulled my yarn through and seamed down...was a bit easier....thank u again...and I'm gonna go get started on a few more! Oh the tassles advice was perfect! Happy holidays to you and your family..you've given a great gift to everyone!

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    4. Glad to hear it turned out so well! And yeah, you can't post pics in my comments. You can always post one on Facebook, if you'd like! :)

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  15. Is this sized for a child? I did the gague swatch and even went up in needle size and this barely stays on my 22" head.

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    1. No, it's sized for an adult, but it has run small for some people. Let me know if you're making it on circulars or straights and I can help you size it up, if you'd like. :)

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    2. Circulars. I ribbed on a 6 and did the body on an 8. I SUPER love this pattern and i would love to have one that fits. lol

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    3. As requested, here are in-the-round instructions for an adult large version of this hat. As always when I haven’t knit something myself, I may have missed something or failed to think something through properly. Let me know if there are any problems!

      Oh, and I had to post them in two comments, since it’s too long! :)

      Using your straight needles in size US 5, cast on 126 stitches loosely. Then work the following rows:

      Edging Row 1 (wrong side): p2, * k2, p2; rep from *

      Edging Row 2: k2, * p2, k2 *

      Knit rows 1 & 2 until the piece measures roughly 1.75” and you've just finished row 1 of the pattern. Then we'll knit one marker placement row, as follows:

      Marker Placement Row (right side): k2, (p2, k2) 4 times, place marker, (p2, k2) 22 times, p2, place marker, k2, * p2, k2 * until end of row

      Complete this marker placement row and switch to your straight size US 7 needles. Then, we'll begin the main pattern, like so:

      Row 1 and all odd rows (wrong side): purl, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Row 2: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (122 stitches)

      Row 4: ssk, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (120 stitches)

      Row 6: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (118 stitches)

      Row 8: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (116 stitches)

      Row 10: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k3, * rt, lt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker, rt, lt, k3, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (114 stitches)

      Row 12: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k2, * rt, k2, lt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (112 stitches)

      Row 14: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k1, * rt, k4, lt * until you're 1 stitch before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (110 stitches)

      Row 16: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k8, * lt, k6 * until you're 2 stitches before second marker, k2, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (108 stitches)

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    4. Knit rows 1 - 16. Now that we've finished these 16 rows, you should be about to begin a wrong side row. Instead of doing that, however, we're going to join this bad boy in the round. With that in mind, transfer work to your 16" circular needle in size US 7, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll continue like so:

      Row 1 and all odd rows: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Row 2: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 4: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 6: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 8: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 10: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * rt, lt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker, rt, lt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 12: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * rt, k2, lt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 14: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * rt, k4, lt * until you're 1 stitch before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 16: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k8, * lt, k6 * until you're 2 stitches before second marker, k2, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Knit rows 1 - 16, and then knit rows 1 - 9 again, removing extra markers when you come to them. Now it's time to begin the decrease portion of the hat, which goes as follows:

      Row 1: knit

      Row 2: * k10, k2tog * (99 stitches)

      Rows 3 & 4: knit

      Row 5: * k9, k2tog * (90 stitches)

      Row 6: knit

      Row 7: * k8, k2tog * (81 stitches)

      Row 8: knit

      You will probably want to switch to your dpns about now...

      Row 9: * k7, k2tog * (72 stitches)

      Row 10: * k6, k2tog * (63 stitches)

      Row 11: * k5, k2tog * (54 stitches)

      Row 12: * k4, k2tog * (45 stitches)

      Row 13: * k3, k2tog * (36 stitches)

      Row 14: * k2, k2tog * (27 stitches)

      Row 15: * k1, k2tog * (18 stitches)

      Row 16: * k2tog * (9 stitches)

      Knit rows 1 - 16, clip your yarn tail, and thread through final 9 stitches. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. Make 2 roughly 6" yarn tassels and attach to bottom corners of hat. Tuck in ends. Finally, you may want to knot together the two stitches where you joined this hat in the round - although it should be fine structurally either way, knotting them will prevent them from pulling apart when this hat is worn.

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    5. As a note, row 6 in the first part of the pattern above (that reads Row 6: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (118 stitches)) is incorrect - it should read Row 6: ssk, knit until you reach marker, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (118 stitches)

      I can't edit the above comment, or I would! :) However, if you don't see this note until it's too late, simply skip the last decrease in rows 2 & 5 of the decrease and you should be back on track!!! :)

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  16. Hello, What size circumference head is the small adult & large adult?

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    1. Hi there!

      The adult small should be good for up to about a 22.5" head and I'd go for the large for a bigger one. This hat also seems to be particularly susceptible to each knitter's personal quirks, since I've seen plenty of size small hats that fit various adults very well, and I've also seen projects made exactly the same way that turn out more child size. Long story short, gauge is important, and I'd veer towards large if you're on the fence! :)

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  17. Hi Gretchen!
    Just wanted to let you know I've made this pattern four times over the past month and love each and every hat. Your pattern is absolutely perfect and very easy to follow. I know my family will love their new Christmas hats - thank you, thank you, thank you so much!!!! xoxoox :-)

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    1. Yay! I'm so happy to hear it. :) And it sounds like you will make some people very happy this Christmas!!!

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  18. i just recently knittted this hat, and it ended up HUGE. Three days later, I was browsing some of your other patterns and discovered that you used US sizes, and not mm...

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    1. I'm sorry to hear that! Some of my older patterns are still missing the US distinction, but all of my newer ones (including this one) are marked correctly. Perhaps you can find a large-headed friend? :)

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  19. Hello, I'm going to try this in DK wool on the larger size.... will let you know how it goes..

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  20. Stunning. I will make it for my daughter as m6 next personal project. I do knit to sell. If I made this and it sold would that be okay? Would you like any money? I knit for the cost of yarn plus 30 to 40 dollars, more to support the habbit, certainly won't retire so I keep my day job.

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    Replies
    1. Oh my god I just found this comment in my spam folder! I'm so sorry, but I'm hoping a reply is better late than never!!! Anyway, yes, go ahead and sell away, the only thing I ask for is pattern credit if you're doing it online! :)

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  21. After the initial 16 round pattern, do you knit rows 1-16 or repeat rows 1-16? Same with decrease section?

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    Replies
    1. Eep! Apparently I haven't been checking my spam folder, which is where this comment turned up! I truly apologize. Anyway, I always give the total to knit - so if I write out 16 rows and then say "knit rows 1 - 16" I mean to knit them once, not twice. Again, sorry I'm a million years late!!!

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  22. After the first 16 rows, I take it the 1-16 next is without the decreases?

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    1. Hi Sheryll!

      Yes, the next sixteen rows don't have any decreases on the sides like the first sixteen. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  23. Hi Gretchen
    What a beautiful bonnet... it is like a work of art!
    I am so looking forward to knitting it :)
    Do you have any measurements for the ribbed edge (the k2,p2-part) - the full length measured flat - without the tassels?
    I think it is so cute when this part it is long (like in your photo), going around the face and down towards the shoulders...
    Thx :)

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    Replies
    1. Hi Katrine!

      I'm glad to hear you like the pattern! :) And the ribbed edging measures about 26 1/4 inches in length. Let me know if you have any other questions!

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    2. Thank you. Well yes, actually I do have some more questions :)
      I was thinking of making the ribbed edging and the earflaps a little extra long, like 28 inches (as the edging tends to «shrink» somewhat due to its ribbed structure) - while keeping the rest of the hat (the part after joining in the round) more snug and fit around my head (22 inches).
      My gauge for the ribbed edging with Malabrigo Rios yarn is 35 sts = 7,4 inches.
      So casting on 118 sts will only make the ribbed edging 25 inches. So I might need to cast on 134 or 142 sts. But I would like to arrive at 96 sts for the "in the round-part», because I don´t want the whole hat to be an XL-size. Do you see what I mean?
      If you have any suggestions for the decreases (in the diamond part-section) to achieve this, I would be very grateful. Unless I will just experiment myself… Thank you :)

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    3. Hi again!

      I don't think you will have trouble making these changes - you can simply build double decreases into the hat instead of the singles (so instead of starting with ssk, knit until you have 2 before marker, k2tog, just do ssk, ssk, knit until you have 4 stitches before marker, k2tog, k2tog. You will need to figure out the math on exactly how you'll do it once you figure out your cast on number (or I can help you with that). I don't think you need to be too fussy, though! As long as you build the decreases in regularly it should look great. Just don't forget to place your stitch markers differently if you change your cast on number! You will still want the same number of pattern stitches in the middle, just more stitches on each side. :) Anyway, like I said, if you determine your cast on number and want more guidance I'm happy to help. I also feel confident telling you that you should be fine to do it yourself!

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    4. OK :) But IF I was to keep the same amount of decreases per row (4), but instead increase for some more rows, the earflaps would just become a little be wider, right?
      How many sts should be left on the sides of each marker/earflap- in your original design with 118 sts cast on - before joining in the round?
      I have casted on 134 sts now, and finished with the ribbed edging.
      When placing the markers, should I then have 82 sts in the middle, and 26 sts on each side? I am a bit confused about how many sts there are in each diamond-pattern repetition...

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    5. Hi Katrine!

      I am not quite sure about your first question - are you saying you would keep the decreases the same but knit the diamond pattern for one more repeat? Yes, you could definitely do that, although the hat would become deeper, so it would fit differently.

      Otherwise - yes, you should have 82 in the middle and 26 on each side. The diamond pattern repetition takes 8 stitches, plus some side stitches to make it look right. As you can see from the pictures, however, it doesn't go all the way around the hat.

      Anyway, I hope I've answered your questions! Let me know if I haven't. :)

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    6. Hi Gretchen, thank you so much for answering all my questions.
      Happy New Year :)

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    7. You are very welcome! Please let me know if you have any more. And Happy New Year to you as well!!! :)

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  24. I'm self taught and relatively new to knitting. After I knit the edging and the marker placement row and row 1, I have 118 stitches 18-82-18. When I knit row 2 I have 116 stitches 17-82-17. The pattern says I should have 114 stitches. What am I missing?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Probably two decreases! ;) Each side has a ssk and a k2tog, so you should be decreasing by four stitches each right side row. Let me know if you have any other questions, or if I didn't straighten this out for you! :)

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    2. Happy New Year. Thanks a lot I was taking ssk as slip stitch knitwise.

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    3. Happy New Year to you as well! And I am always happy to answer questions, don't worry. :)

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  25. I am quite used to knitting but I have a query that may seem obvious to you. When you say "slip marker" does this mean slip i.e don't knit the marked stitch just slip it?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Polly!

      The markers are simply in the pattern so you don't have to count a bunch of stitches on the sides of the piece, but instead just count from the markers. For that reason, they should be more or less ignored, which is why I've instructed to slip them. What I mean by that is that you should perform the instructions up to the marker (knitting or whatever on each stitch as instructed), then slip the marker from your left needle to your right needle so it maintains its position in the pattern but does nothing else. Then you will continue as instructed, knitting or whatnot on the stitch directly after the marker. The more I write about this the less sense I feel I'm making, so let me know if I haven't been clear! Basically I'm just trying to say that they're placeholders, but you should continue to work all of the stitches around them! :)

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    2. I am now quite clear about the placement of markers. They are on the needles between stitches. The problem I continue to have is that in row 2, working over the 82 constant stitches, starting with a knit stitch and working the twist and knit stitches as described, I end up with 3 stitches before the marker. I have knitted up to row 12 four times and have stopped and started again because there are two extra stitches on on side of the patterned section.
      I have printed off a grid and marked out the pattern and still cannot see where i am going wrong. Indeed, if you take of the knit stitches at the beginning of the patterned section, you are left with 80 stitches. If you then divide those 80 stitches by the 6 stitches that compose the pattern, you do not have a complete final 6. I cannot get past this problem, help please!

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    3. Hi Pauline!

      The pattern is actually composed of 8 stitches, since the lt and the rt are both made with two stitches apiece. I'm not exactly sure how you're ending up with three extra stitches at the end of row 2, although if you are somehow working those twists with just one stitch then that math works out. So - are you somehow working these twists with just one stitch? Because, with an eight stitch pattern, the 80 stitches + 2 should work out! :)

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    4. I can see my error very clearly now and will start again soon!

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    5. Oh good! Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  26. Hi Gretchen,

    Love the hat and am just starting the pattern at row 1, purl all wrong sides where you do the left and right twists. I am counting ahead a bit to make sure I'm doing this row 2 correctly and end up with the correct counts. I currently have the 118 stitches. I have 18 on each end before/after the markers and 82 between the markers. No matter how I count this out, I have 100 stitches at the end of row 2, not 114. So I'm decreasing each stitch by one on the first 18, leaving 9, no decreases between the markers, and another 9 decreases after the second marker. I'm getting 9 before, 82, 9 after, that comes to 100, not 114. What am I missing? Thank you for the awesome pattern!

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  27. Oy! Brainless I am. I just walked away from the pattern and came back to it, picked it up and read row 2 again. It is a ask, then knit, then k2tog. I was decreasing the whole time before the markers. Duh. Sorry to bother you with this, just ignore my previous post question.

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    Replies
    1. Oh good! I love it when people answer their own questions!!!! :) But please let me know if you have any others... :)

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  28. Thank you for replying so quickly. I really love this bonnet and hope i get it right this time. I will look at it again and try to work out where I have gone wrong.

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    Replies
    1. Sounds good! Sorry I couldn't be more help. :)

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  29. Mine is a simple question (I hope). On the pattern, the Gauge shows that 18 stitches = 4 inches. Is this using size 5 or size 7 straight needles.Thank you.

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  30. Further to my question about the gauge. It usually consists of number of stitches and number of rows. But only stitches are mentioned. Can you please explain this in more detail. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. The gauge is achieved with size US 7 needles, and the row gauge is about 26 stitches per 4 inches. Let me know if you have any more questions! :)

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  31. Hi, I was recently diagnosed with breast cancer and have started chemo and consequently lost my hair so I am really excited to try this pattern. This hat is adorable! It will cover my head and keep me warm. It's hard to find cute hat patterns that cover the entire head, so thank you!!! :)

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    Replies
    1. I'm sorry to hear about your diagnosis but hope this hat will serve you well. Please let me know if you have any questions! :)

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  32. I really want to make this hat. You are very talented and I have to admit that is is going to be the most technically difficult project I have ever taken on. I would like to use a Noro 50/50 silk/wool, it is 100 gr but the yardage is only 150 meters. Do you have recommendations regarding stitch count and or needle size variations or do you not advise this substitute?
    Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Hi there! This hat runs a little small and I think your fiber may be a decent substitution. However, I'm having trouble figuring out exactly which yarn you're using. Can you give me the name of it or any more gauge information? Then I can help more! :)

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  33. One of thing I did not make clear is that I only have one skien. I bought it from a sale bin a couple of years ago. This Noro is called Kogarashi. The tag says 100 gr, 150 meters, US 8 or 10 mm. I just want to get this right the first time.
    Thank you

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    Replies
    1. Ah hah! That complicates things somewhat. :) Long story short, of course I can't guarantee that the yarn will get this hat done. However, I strongly suspect that you could finish it, but I'm not 100% sure about the tassels. If you decide to do it, I would probably knit it basically as-is - you could gauge up to size US 6/US 8 needles, or you could simply knit the bigger yarn with the 5's and 7's and I imagine it would turn out nicely. Of course, as I say this, I realize that it's definitely more of an experimental project that it sounds like you want to undertake. We could also adapt the hat to have 8 less stitches. Then I am nearly positive you would have enough yarn, although the tassels might still be in question...

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  34. Ok, the tassels were probably going to be omitted or likely replaced with something smaller. I am older than you and the tassels are a little too young for my taste. By changing needle size would you just knit the whole thing on a 6? ......and where would you reduce the stitches, is that going to make the hat small, my head is 22" circumference.
    Still wanting to consider everything before I dive in.

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    Replies
    1. Oh sorry, I meant the ribbing on 6's and the bulk of the hat on 8's. :) And if we cut 8 stitches and you were getting 16 stitches = 4 inch gauge then the hat would fit perfectly. If you're strongly considering this project I suggest making two small swatches, one on size 7 needles and one on size 8 or 9. Then you can figure out your gauge and there will be a lot less guesswork involved!

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  35. Oh I'm knitting socks at the moment Tomorrow I'm going to knit this bonnet oh your so clever, I love your patterns thank you so much for sharing your genius. Xxx

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    Replies
    1. I'm glad you like the pattern, I loved the way this one turned out!!! :) Anyway, let me know if you have any questions, I'm always happy to help! :)

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  36. Hi there, just finished my first of these hats and it was fun and fabulous! No sure what the heck happened....yes I did a swatch but it ended up using exactly the same yarn as you did & needles >>> to be a child size! yikes. Bought more yarn and saw your large adult addition- thanks for that. I decided our family much have gigantic head so I added 12 MORE to what you suggested which gave me 138 stitches total. All was well on round 4 of pattern and I had 3 stitches left before the 2nd marker ending this row! I carefully went back and looked and my knitting and it was without any errors, Yikes! I'm afraid to go forward as the pattern is a building one and I don't want to mess it up! any ideas much appreciated! I have now 132 st left on my needle with 16 stitches on R & L of their markers. It's just that difference in stitches ending that row that has scared me into submission. Thanks in advance

    ReplyDelete
  37. I never posted before and the above comment is me...hate 'unknown'
    sorry!
    Stephanie

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    Replies
    1. Hi Stephanie! First off, I apologize but I am out of town and working from my phone so it's a bit harder for me to look back at the pattern to help. However, it doesn't sound like your stitch pattern is messed up, just the number of stitches you have on the edges? If that's the case I really wouldn't worry about it - decrease slightly lopsidedly if you need to to even the stitch count on either side and get to the number of stitches you want for your hat, and then proceed from there! I don't think you'll even notice when you're done.

      Oh, and if I misunderstood your question let me know!!! :)

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    2. Oh sorry Gretchen for catching you out of town. Thanks so much for your quick response. No it's the number of stitches just before the markers where the pattern begins and disappears into the stockinette stitch. my stitch count outside after the marker is equal. Row 4 you are just starting to build on the design and I don't want to throw off how that all lines up at all. If it was after the markers I would just fudge it through....sigh. did that make any sense? so much for my ad libbing a giant size hat! :)

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    3. Ah hah! Gotcha. Still though, I wouldn't worry too much. Count out the repeats and see if you're actually missing a stitch or if you've added a stitch or anything, and then just increase/decrease to compensate. Yes, it will be a small error but nothing you'll see in a finished piece! I am a perfectionist, personally, but I've learned that knitting is not nearly as fussy as I am!!!!

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    4. yes me too....knitting helps me with that for sure! ok I will just make it work. guess I will see right off if the pattern within the markers isn't lining up and can rip it out. I carefully went over each stitch and see no issue. Guess I was wondering if adding another 12 stitches in the middle would change the pattern st before each marker....fingers crossed not. If it says one stitch left before marker I will just make sure it is one stitch! thanks for kindly taking the time to help me. I LOVE your site and take on things~! Me thinks I would go crazy without the knitting at times!~ haha! take care~

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    5. Oh my gosh yes I'm totally asleep, you're right! Adding twelve stitches between the markers will make it goofy - you need to add a multiple of eight. However, you can just add k2 to either side and be okay... I hope I haven't messed you up too much by not reading your question well enough! I apologize! :)

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  38. After the 1st 16 rows do you start knitting in the round

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    Replies
    1. Yes, that's right! Let me know if you have any more questions! :)

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  39. Can you tell me what ssk stands for? Have sorted needle sizes in mm's and sorted out appropriate yarn but can't decipher 'ssk'.

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    Replies
    1. Hi there! Ssk stands for slip, slip, knit, a standard two-to-one, left-leaning decrease. You can find more information about it, and other glossary-related questions on my glossary page, here: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/p/glossary-of-knitting-terms.html

      Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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    2. Thank you so much for your prompt reply. Can't believe that I didn't know that for the amount of knitting I have done throughout my life.

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    3. No worries, it happens! :) And let me know if you have any other questions!!!

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  40. Hello! What an awesome hat for a cold Canadian winter. I am looking forward to trying out this pattern, but I need help with the yarn weight. I don't understand what 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams means. Is this a worsted weight?

    Thanks,
    Leslie

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    Replies
    1. Hi Leslie!

      The yardage is given more so you know how much yarn you need - you can figure out the weight from the gauge (18 stitches = 4 inches falls in the worsted category according to the Craft Yarn Council's guide: http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/weight.html), or from the tag at the bottom of the post, below the pictures (and again, yes, this one is worsted!)! Anyway, let me know if you have any other questions, I'm always happy to help. :)

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    2. Thanks for the reply Gretchen...I appreciate it. I missed the tag at the bottom...oops! And I love the Craft Yarn Council weight guide. Perfect! Thanks again!

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    3. No worries! I know it's kind of hidden!!! :)

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  41. Gretchen, I absolutely love all of your patterns! You are very talented. (Especially if you're doing this with 3 little boys at home.) I just finished this hat, it came out beautiful, and I made the tassels, but I'm just not sure how to attach them. Do you sew them on? Thank you for posting all of these, I have about 4 more that I want to do ...right now! :)
    Anne

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    1. Hi Anne! You should be able to just tie the tassels on using the tie that you tied the top with (was that enough repetitions of the word "tie"?). Then you can either tuck in the ends on your hat or thread them back through and down and out the tassel and snip them off! :)

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  42. Hello Gretchen. I have been knitting the large size hat that you posted higher up in the comments...casting on 126 stitches. I am wondering if there is a math problem in the instructions with the first 16 rows and the decreases...row 2 and 4 are correct leaving you with 120 stitches. But then row 6 decreases by 4 stitches, therefore should leave you with 116 (not 118). Then the remaining rows need to be corrected by 2 each. Total number of stitches should be 106? Am I wrong? I was so puzzled after row 16 that I had only 106 and not 108 stitches. I went back and this is what I figured out. I haven't gotten to the decreases for the crown of the hat yet. But I assume there will need to be corrections for that math as well perhaps?

    Anyway, it's a great pattern and I've been enjoying knitting it so far.

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    Replies
    1. I've now gotten to the decrease for the crown. Row 2, I end up with 98 stitches, ending with K10 and no stitches left for the last decrease. I'm thinking maybe I should start that row with a K2Tog, then proceed with K10 K2Tog? Can you help me out on that?

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    2. Yes, you're right, row 6 is a problem (and unfortunately I can't modify comments, so I can't fix it!). And the best way to deal with it is just to skip that last k2tog in both rows 2 & 5 of the decrease, and not make up for it. Then by the time you finish row 5 your stitch count will be correct, and I promise you you won't notice in the finished hat unless you look for it very carefully!!! :) And sorry for the confusion! I'll post a note in the comment below that comment, and wish I could edit! :)

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  43. Just finished this hat for my daughter. I used a lovely green yarn. Just have to put on the tassels. Will post a picture on your Facebook page.

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    1. Yay! :) Thanks for sharing, glad it worked out!!!

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  44. I'm going to try a pair of fingerless mitts to match.

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  45. Hi there! This is really lovely, can't wait to give it a try! I'd love to use some wonderful 3 ply ww alpaca but I'm afraid I have only 200 yds rather than 210. Would using another yarn for the tassels stretch it out enough? Thanks!

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    1. Glad you like the pattern! :) And I *think* you'll probably have enough yarn either way, but if you don't it shouldn't be a problem to use something contrasting for the tassels. And let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  46. HI Gretchen! Thanks for this great pattern! I am wondering about the decrease section. I'm working in the flat. Are the decreases supposed to line up or are they scattered? The picture looks like they line up but mine are not. Also, is there any way to avoid having the decreases right at the edge? They make it a bit more difficult to seam the finished item nicely.

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    1. Hi Edna!

      To answer your questions: first, yes, the decreases should line up (and I've looked back through the pattern and it looks to me like I've written things correctly, although I definitely make mistakes now and again). And secondly, yes, there is of course a way to write the decreases without appearing at the edges of the hat, but for symmetry's sake and the constraints of writing the pattern in two versions that's what I felt was best. If you'd prefer you could always move the first/last decrease in by one stitch, so that it's not at the edge! :)

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    2. Thanks for your reply and happy new year! I've ripped back to start the decrease section again. Maybe I will have better luck with it this time around. I may just give myself some markers to keep me on track. I the I will try doing the decreases by moving them in from the edge by half the number of plain stitches. It should still be symmetrical and have the same number of decreases without any on the very edge until the few final rows.

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    3. Sounds like you have a good plan in place! Good luck, and let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  47. Hi, I have a problem that I cannot figure out for the life of me. I have gotten to the second half,where you do the 1-16 rows again but without the decreases, but row 2 is not lining up with row 16. I have re-worked the hat twice and still have the same problem and was hoping maybe you could help.

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    1. Hi there!

      I've looked back over the pattern and I only have one decent(ish) idea for you; perhaps you're thinking that row 16 is just like row 8, where you just work crosses. However, on row 16 you also had two twisted pattern stitches that you sort of abandoned from row 14 - the first rt, one stitch in from your first marker, and the last lt, one stitch away from your second marker. Maybe row 2 looks like it doesn't line up because you're forgetting about those stitches, so the immediate lt seems to come from nowhere, when in fact it's picking up on the pattern from row 14?

      Anyway, I have no idea if I'm making any sense or not, or if this is your problem. If things still seem mysterious email me a picture at ballstothewallsknits@gmail.com and I'll see if I can do another diagnosis! :)

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    2. Thank you for getting back to me so quickly! I will go back over what I have done and see. Thank you again.

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    3. Happy to (hopefully) help. And, like I said, send me an email if things still aren't working out! :)

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  48. hi, I like ur hat, beautifully done . I started with it but stuck in doing rt n lt... not able to decipher it, as i am getting 2 sts at a time in the needle. so when i do the purls on the wrong side shd i do them separately or 2 at a time (counting it as one )??? while seeing the pattern on the hat I dont see ant twisted sts but feel them as slipped stitch done in a rhombus shape. where I am wrong??

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    1. Hi, yes, each rt and lt starts with 2 stitches and ends with two stitches, which will be close together on the needle, as you have noticed. They should be worked separately, as two purls, and you will begin to see the twisted stitch pattern emerge as you continue! :)

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  49. I was shopping for a merino wool hat when I stumbled on your site. You have many beautiful designs and I have been inspired to get back into knitting. I just picked up Malabrigo Rio 863 Zarzamora for this project and I am anxiously waiting for my needles to arrive. (I didn't have the size among my collection so I order an interchangeable set since I plan to make some of your other hat projects.) Thanks for your generosity in sharing your designs - Emily.

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    1. Hi Emily!

      I'm glad I could be inspiring for you. :) And I think that colorway will be amazing - let me know if you have any questions!

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  50. im making this now (from singapore)

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    1. Great, let me know if you have any questions! :)

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  51. For gauge, should i get 4" with the size 5 or size 8 needle?
    Thanks!

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    1. The larger one! :) Let me know if you have any other questions!!!

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  52. I am knitting this hat for my daughter in law. I could not find

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  53. Help, help please. Need help in converting pattern from malabrigo Rios yarn (worsted) to malabrigo Rastita (DK). Head circumference is 20 3/4 inches. Gauge 6 stitches = 1 inch using 6 US NEEDLES. How many stitches do I need to cast on? How many stitches on each side of the pattern and how many in between the markers. Reply ASAP greatly appreciated. . Thanks

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    1. Hi there!

      Apologies, but gauge conversion takes quite a bit more time than size conversion and there's no way I'll get to it before the weekend! :) Let me know if you're still interested though and I'll let you know when I have a converted pattern available.

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  54. Thanks for your prompt reply. Will await for the converted pattern. Thanks again

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    1. Okay, you can find the pattern below! It's posted in multiple comments for space requirements. :)

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    2. Needles: One set of straight needles in one size smaller than your gauge needles, one set of straight needles in gauge, one 16" circular needle in gauge, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in gauge

      Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

      So let's get started! For either version of this hat, we'll be working from the brim of the piece, and we'll begin by working back and forth rather than in the round. As such, using your smaller straight needles, cast on 158 stitches loosely. Then work the following rows:

      Edging Row 1 (wrong side): p2, * k2, p2; rep from *

      Edging Row 2: k2, * p2, k2 *

      Knit rows 1 & 2 until the piece measures just over 1" and you've just finished Edging Row 1. Then we'll knit one marker placement row, as follows:

      Marker Placement Row (right side): k2, (p2, k2) 5 times, place marker, (p2, k2) 28 times, p2, place marker, k2, * p2, k2 * until end of row

      Complete this marker placement row and switch to your straight gauge needles. Then we'll proceed like so:

      Row 1 and all odd rows (wrong side): purl, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Row 2: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (154 stitches)

      Row 4: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (150 stitches)

      Row 6: ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left before marker, k2tog, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, ssk, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (146 stitches)

      Row 8: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (144 stitches)

      Row 10: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k3, * rt, lt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker, rt, lt, k3, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (142 stitches)

      Row 12: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k2, * rt, k2, lt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (140 stitches)

      Row 14: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k1, * rt, k4, lt * until you're 1 stitch before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (138 stitches)

      Row 16: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k8, * lt, k6 * until you're 2 stitches before second marker, k2, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (136 stitches)

      Row 18: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (134 stitches)

      Row 20: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (132 stitches)

      Row 22: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2tog (130 stitches)

      Row 24: ssk, knit until you reach next marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until there are two stitches left before end of row, k2tog (128 stitches)

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    3. Knit rows 1 - 24. At this point, our pattern diverges - first, I will give instructions for how to proceed with this hat in the round. After that, you'll find instructions for finishing it up on straight needles. So, first, the in the round version:

      Now that we've finished these 16 rows, you should be about to begin a wrong side row. Instead of doing that, however, we're going to join this bad boy in the round. With that in mind, transfer work to your 16" gauge circular needle, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll continue like so:

      Row 1 and all odd rows: knit, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Row 2: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * rt, lt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker, rt, lt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 4: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * rt, k2, lt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 6: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * rt, k4, lt * until you're 1 stitch before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 8: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k8, * lt, k6 * until you're 2 stitches before second marker, k2, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 10: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 12: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 14: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 16: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Knit rows 1 - 16, and then knit rows 1 - 9 again, removing extra markers when you come to them. Now it's time to begin the decrease portion of the hat, which goes as follows:

      Row 1: knit

      Row 2: * k12, k2tog * (117 stitches)

      Rows 3 & 4: knit

      Row 5: * k11, k2tog * (108 stitches)

      You will probably want to switch to your dpns about now...

      Row 6: knit

      Row 7: * k10, k2tog * (99 stitches)

      Row 8: knit

      Row 9: * k9, k2tog * (90 stitches)

      Row 10: * k8, k2tog (81 stitches)

      Row 11: * k7, k2tog * (72 stitches)

      Row 12: * k6, k2tog * (63 stitches)

      Row 13: * k5, k2tog * (54 stitches)

      Row 14: * k4, k2tog * (45 stitches)

      Row 15: * k3, k2tog * (36 stitches)

      Row 16: * k2, k2tog * (27 stitches)

      Row 17: * k1, k2tog * (18 stitches)

      Row 18: * k2tog * (9 stitches)

      Knit rows 1 - 18, clip your yarn tail, and thread through final 9 stitches. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. And now skip to the verrrrrry end for the last bit of instructions. And while you in-the-round knitters are doing that, I'll finish up with the straight needle knitters.

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    4. So if you're working on straight needles, pick up here!

      Last I left you, you had just finished knitting 24 rows in pattern with decreases. You're going to be continuing in much the same fashion at this point, except without the decreases. So let's proceed like so:

      Row 1 and all wrong side rows: purl, slipping extra markers when you come to them

      Row 2: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * rt, lt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker, rt, lt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 4: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * rt, k2, lt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 6: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * rt, k4, lt * until you're 1 stitch before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 8: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k8, * lt, k6 * until you're 2 stitches before second marker, k2, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 10: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k1, * lt, k4, rt * until you have 1 stitch left before second marker, k1, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 12: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, * lt, k2, rt, k2 * until you reach second marker, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 14: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k3, * lt, rt, k4 * until you're 7 stitches before second marker lt, rt, k3, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Row 16: knit until you reach first marker, slip marker, k4, * rt, k6 * until you're 6 stitches before second marker, rt, k4, slip marker, knit until end of round

      Knit rows 1 - 16 and then knit rows 1 - 9 again, removing extra markers when you work it. Now it's time to begin the decrease portion of the hat, which goes as follows:

      Row 1 (right side): knit

      Row 2: * p2tog, p12 * (117 stitches)

      Row 3: knit

      Row 4: purl

      Row 5: * k11, k2tog * (108 stitches)

      Row 6: purl

      Row 7: * k10, k2tog * (99 stitches)

      Row 8: purl

      Row 9: * k9, k2tog * (90 stitches)

      Row 10: * p2tog, p8 * (81 stitches)

      Row 11: * k7, p2tog * (72 stitches)

      Row 12: * p2tog, p6 * (63 stitches)

      Row 13: * k5, k2tog * (54 stitches)

      Row 14: * p2tog, p4 * (45 stitches)

      Row 15: * k3, k2tog * (36 stitches)

      Row 16: * p2tog, p2 * (27 stitches)

      Row 17: * k1, k2tog * (18 stitches)

      Row 18: * p2tog * (9 stitches)

      Knit decrease rows 1 - 18, and then thread final 9 stitches to a scrap of yarn to hold for later. Beginning from where you stopped doing decreases in the original pattern (and where the in-the-round knitters switched to the round), seam hat. When you reach the top, pull seaming thread through final 8 stitches and pull tight. Thread to inside of hat and knot.

      And now, for both in-the-round and straight needle knitters, we'll wrap up like so:

      Make 2 roughly 6" yarn tassels and attach to bottom corners of hat. Tuck in ends. Finally, if you completed this hat in the round, you may want to knot together the two stitches where you joined this hat in the round - although it should be fine structurally either way, knotting them will prevent them from pulling apart when this hat is worn. And let's face it - with a hat this cute, you're going to be wearing it a LOT.

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