Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Sailor's Rib Cowl

Sailor's Rib Cowl

I bought this yarn nearly a year ago, I believe, with the intention of making a nice scarf for my husband with it. But since he was never very enthusiastic about said scarf, it never got made. And then he renewed his determination to bike commute this winter and it dawned on both of us: he didn't need a scarf, he needed a cowl. A nice, snug, long cowl that he can pull up over his face when the temperatures dip into the teens and the winds are blowing. And, to be quite honest, I'm kind of amazed that the idea never occurred to me before. After all, while I doubt he'll start wearing this cowl as a new man fashion statement (not because it isn't pretty, but because I haven't seen many men in cowls), it tucks into a jacket with much less bulk than a scarf, and looks just as nice.

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #9458 Bainbridge Island Heather - 1 skein

A closer look at the pattern
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make this bad boy! First, cast on 100 stitches, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll move straight to the main pattern, which is Fisherman's Rib from page 4 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. Anyway, it goes as follows:

Row 1: * p1, k2, p1, k1 *

Row 2: * p1, k2, p1, k1 through back loop (k1-tbl) * 

Row 3: * p4, k1 *

Row 4: * p4, k1-tbl *

Knit rows 1 - 4 until piece measures between 8 and 12 inches, depending on preference (I stopped at 10"), and you've just finished row 2 of the pattern. Bind off loosely in pattern and tuck in ends.






81 comments:

  1. Another very nice and snuggly warm pattern designed by you. Have an enjoyable Thanksgiving.

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    1. Thanks Susan! I'm sure it's clear by now that I love a nice, fancy, shaped cowl, but sometimes something simpler does the trick :) And I hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving as well!

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  2. I love this cowl. It will be perfect on those blustery, windy days, when a scarf gets blown around in the wind. Thanks for sharing your pattern. Have a great Thanksgiving.

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    1. Thanks Mary Lynn! I'm glad to hear you like this cowl - I think it's functional and attractive, and I'm glad you agree :)

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  3. I love the pattern and colours you've used to make the cowl. It looks
    very stylish.
    Cheers, Anita.

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    1. Thanks Anita! I appreciate the feedback :)

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  4. Did you knit this with double yarn, i.e. two skeins? Does it have to be done that way? Very nice cowl, would like to make it for my daughter.

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    1. Hi Wilma!

      Nope, this is knit with a single skein of yarn. This particular one happens to have both black and brown in it, but it's still just a single skein! And please, let me know if you have any other questions :)

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  5. Would love to knit this but not familiar with Cascade yarn. Is this worsted weight?
    Thanks, Joan

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  6. Sorry! just found the answer in your intro that worsted is what I need!

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    1. No worries! I am always happy to answer questions :) As a general rule, I also tag all of my patterns with the yarn weight, so you can look at the bottom of the post, in the "labels" section, to find this information as well. Furthermore, I follow the Craft Yarn Council's guidelines for gauge and weight, which you can find here: http://www.craftyarncouncil.com/weight.html

      I know, more information than you asked for :) But, like I said, I'm always happy to answer questions!

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  7. I love the pattern, but my husband would like it very thick. I wiuld like to knit it using double strand (2 skeins ) of Plymouth Yarn Encore Tweed, worsted weight. What size circular needle would you recommend and how many stitches would you cast on?

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    1. Hello there!

      It may take a little bit of experimenting to get exactly what you're going for, but I recommend using a size US 9 or US 10 needle, and casting on 60 - 75 stitches, depending on how the gauge works out. As long as you cast on a multiple of 5 (so 60, 65, 70, or 75, etc), you should be good to go with the pattern! And, of course, you'll need more stitches if you go with the smaller needle, less with the larger. It just depends on how dense you want your fabric to be (and, again, your gauge). Good luck! :)

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  8. I made this for my son and it was the best pattern to knit up. It only took me 3 evenings of work and it's off the needles. I used a Paton's Canadiana and a 4.5 mm needle as that was what I had in stock. Sorry, I live in Canada and have no idea what 4.5 converts to.

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    1. I'm so glad to hear that this pattern worked out well for you! :) And while it sounds like you did just fine on your needles, here's a handy conversion chart for US to metric sizes, in case you ever need one: http://www.yarnfwd.com/main/needleconv.html

      I hope your son loves his new cowl!

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    2. Hi there - you used the Paton's Canadiana. I'm looking at it but notice it's approx 187m. Did you run out of yarn using this?

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    3. Hi there!

      I can't remember *exactly* how much yarn I used on this project since it was awhile ago... However, I am confident that I didn't run out, and I don't think I got terribly near the end of the skein either. Your yarn should be perfectly suited to the project; you can basically just knit until you're happy with the length, or run out!!! :)

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  9. Hello,
    Thank you for this pattern, I did it for my husband and I will post it on my blog with a link to your blog. Did you agree that I write the french translation of your pattern?
    Thank you! ave a nice day!

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    1. Hello there!

      I'm glad to hear you liked this pattern! My husband is still wearing his as well. :) And you are welcome to post a French translation of the pattern, as long as you link back to the original pattern in your post. Can't wait to see how yours turned out!

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  10. I plan to knit the sailor's rib cowl as a birthday present for my 29 year old son who has taken up sailing on the Potomac River. I want to knit a matching pair of fingerless gloves. Do you have a pattern? If not, could you create one with a thumb hole for a better grip on the ropes? Thanks. Deborah Prather - prather.deborah@gmail.com

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    1. Hi Deborah!

      I don't have a pattern for that at the moment, but that's a great idea! By a thumb hole, do you mean no thumb whatsoever (so the most literal version of thumb hole there is, I guess)? If so, I think the best way to make them would be to knit flat and then seam them. I would be happy to help you develop a pattern for that. Another possibility would be to knit them in the round, gusseting in a thumb as you went, and then not work the thumb any further than the gusset. Let me know which idea interests you more, and give me a general idea of your son's hand size (like if you think he's a men's small, large or medium, more or less). Then we can work something out together!

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  11. Gretchen, I was going to write a PS asking about a knitted cap.Greg wears knitted caps. My son is probably a men's large. I like knitting in the round. I don't know what I was thinking. Of course there's a separate hole for the thumb. You have me thinking now. Maybe separate fingers holes would be better for handling ropes. Just not full fingers. I am thinking sturdy. The gloves could have a longer cuff over the wrist bone in the pattern and the rest could be more of a flat design. I was thinking of looking for a washable wool yarn. Maybe knitting with two strands of yarn. Again, I am thinking sturdy. I am sure the gloves will get wet and the water will be cold at times. Greg's birthday is August 19. I thought I could knit the cowl for now and the gloves and cap can follow. Have you seen the fingerless beer gloves from one of the Stitch N Bitch books? I knitted those for my older son who is an outdoorsey person. I think it had a seed sticth pattern for the palm. He loved them and so did his envious friends. I think he wore those gloves out. I could knit him a complete set using your pattern for his birthday in November. I can knit a complete set for my son-in-law for Christmas. What do you think? Deborah Prather - prather.deborah@gmail.com

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    1. Hi Deborah!

      I looked over your comments, and I just want to make sure I understand what you're interested in. You like the basic shape of the Cloverleaf Eyelet Fingerless Gloves, but you'd like them to have thicker palms and match the Sailor's Rib Cowl. I can definitely do that. If you're in the market for half-fingers, though, I'll have to help you find another basic pattern to modify. I am too lazy for fussy knitting, and I definitely consider fingers to be in that category! :) As far as the hat is concerned, I could again definitely help you out with a knit beanie design that matches the cowl, but I simply won't have time to design an adult balaclava in your time frame. I have some more of the yarn that I knit the cowl in, probably enough for both a beanie and fingerless gloves, so my first instinct would be to stick to worsted weight yarn. Let me know what you think!

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  12. Gretchen, I have finished knitting the cowl. I tried it on my head for a cap. I figure I could cast on the same number of stitches - 100. It just needs the shaping. I used a size 8 circular needle since my 7 was in use packed away because of moving. The cowl is plenty loose. I think Greg will like it. He can pull it up over his nose or turn it down. I think it will tuck nicely into his rain jacket or any other jacket or sweatshirt - he wears hoodies, too. Let's see how Greg likes the fingerless gloves. Later, if Greg wants more coverage for individual fingers I am sure I could find a pattern to modify using your patten for the arm/sleeve of the glove. I did buy extra yarn checking the dye lot number. I cannot wait to knit the fingerless gloves. Thanks for your help. Deborah Prather - prather.deborah@gmail.com

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  13. Gretchen, I went back and looked at the pictures of the Cloverleaf Eyelet fingerless gloves. I think that pattern would be easy to modify. How would you go about making the palm side sturdier? Or do you think it would be sturdy enough as is? I could use another strand of the same yarn or maybe you know of a different type of yarn in a matching color that could be used as a second strand to give the palm side more strength. This is fun working with you. Deborah Prather - prather.deborah@gmail.com

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    1. Hi again!

      I have a plan for these gloves! :) Can you give me about a week to knit it up? If I can't post the pattern immediately, I'd be happy to email it to you in advance. And am I correct thinking that you can handle the hat on your own? Let me know! :)

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  14. Gretchen, no I would like you to figure out the shaping of the cap. I know you will adjust the number of stiches if necessary for the cap. I know you will post the pattern for the fingerless gloves and probably for the cap. I am anxious to knit the gloves. If you can email me the pattern in advance, that would be great. Deborah Prather (Sailor Girl) - prather.deborah@gmail.com

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    1. Okay, I'll work on the gloves first then! :) I have one other thing I need to finish first, and I'll try to get to those next.

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    2. Gretchen, I will check back in a few days. I know you are a busy mom. You have my email address. I'll tell you about me later on. I found out last night that Greg is now racing sail boats. Exciting and scary. Deborah Prather (Sailor Girl)

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    3. Sounds good! I'll be in touch soon. :)

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  15. I knit up a test swatch with suggested worsted weight and needles and it was true. I did this flat rather than in the round as I wanted to try it as a scarf. I did the conversions for flat knitting on rows 1 and three to preserve the k1 tbl ond rows 2 and 4. That said, I notice my ribs if stockinette are not as clearly defined as yours. I did redo my swatch just to be sure I hadn't made an error. Suggestions?

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    1. Hmmm... I'm not coming up with any brilliant answers to this off the top of my head - the reason the stockinette rib stands out is definitely because every other stitch is knit through the back loop, and therefore twisted, although it sounds like you've gotten that part. Does the look of the fabric seem more defined when you stretch it out (more like it would look after blocking)? I just finished a pair of fingerless gloves with the same stitch pattern and they definitely look less defined when they're not on hands. It sounds like you already double-checked your conversion, too, but, as a triple-check, you should have a purled column on either side of your stockinette column as well, which helps it stands out. Anyway, I don't know if any of that helps, but it's all I can think of right now. :)

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  16. Gretchen, how is the writing of the pattern for the fingerless gloves to go with the sailor's rib cowl? My son is renting a sailboat with friends to sail around the Caribbean in January. I guess it will be warmer weather, but the cowl and gloves might come in handy. I still want to knit a hat/cap with the same pattern. I need a knitting project to work on with a group that meets just to knit and talk. Plus, I like to knit in the evenings while watching TV.

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    1. Hi Deborah!

      I saw your comment on the other post as well, but I just wanted to say hi here too! Again, the mitts are up, and I'll work on the hat in a few weeks too. :)

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  17. Hi, could you please advise how I adjust this cowl pattern for straight needles please?

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    1. Yup! I'm in the middle of a move, though, so give me a day or two. :)

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    2. Hi again!

      I found a minute, and you can find revised instructions below. Let me know if you have any other questions. :)

      So let's make this bad boy! First, then, using your straight needles, cast on 101 stitches. And then we'll move straight to the main pattern. It goes as follows:

      Row 1 (right side): k1 through back loop (k1-tbl), * p1, k2, p1, k1-tbl; rep from *

      Row 2: p1, * k1, p2, k1, p1 *

      Row 3: k1-tbl, * p4, k1-tbl *

      Row 4: p1, * k4, p1 *

      Knit rows 1 - 4 until piece measures between 8 and 12 inches, depending on preference (I stopped at 10"), and you've just finished row 2 of the pattern. Bind off loosely in pattern, seam, and tuck in ends.

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    3. Let me know if you have any questions! :)

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  18. Hello Dear :)
    I'm really impressed about this sailor's rib cowl, and i'm so new to knitting!
    I would love to see exactly how you did it as i don't understand the explanation written in here :(
    do you have a video for how to knit this sailor's rib cowl?
    if yes, then, can you please send me the link or the video?
    my email is: Loma.abou@gmail.com

    Thank you so much in advance,
    Loma.

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    1. Hi Loma!

      Unfortunately, I don't currently have a video for this cowl. I can point you in the right direction for videos about knitting in the round and knitting through the back loop, though, if you think that would help at all. :)

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    2. Dear Tracy,
      that would be very helpful! thank you :)

      Another 2 questions:
      1) you wrote "100 stitches" do you mean 100 stitches in a row?
      2) are each row from the 4 rows repeat it self ? for example : raw 1: p1, k2, p1, k1, p1, k2, p1, k1 .....until i finish the 100 stitches?
      and then after we finish the 4 rows we repeat the 4 rows until piece measures 12 inches?

      thank you so much, and sorry for my english! :)
      Loma,

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    3. Hi again!

      First off, here's a video for joining circular knitting in the round:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1OcF4eFOUA
      And here's a video for knitting through the back loop:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1KiHViK160

      As far as your other questions are concerned - first off, yes, cast on 100 stitches in a row and then join them in the round! :) And secondly, yes, each row repeats itself, and then you repeat the rows in order to make the cowl long enough. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  19. I have started the first repeat, and the knit rib doesn't come out in a straight line as in the photo. Is there an adjustment?

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    1. Hi there!

      The knit rib always occurs on the 5th pattern stitch, so it should continue to line up. :) Does what you have so far look correct?

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  20. I hadn't picked up my needles for a number of years, but my teenage son had some yarn and wanted a cowl and search for a pattern brought me to your page. This is an easy pattern to follow and the finished product looks great. He loves it! Thanks so much!

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    1. Yay! I'm so glad to hear it. And I hope your son continues to love his cowl!!! :)

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  21. I have to say I LOVE this pattern, and that you put a pattern up for straight needles!! I'm on my 4th one. Everyone wants one. Thanks again.
    Karen

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    1. Hi Karen!

      I'm so glad to hear that the pattern is working out so well for you!!!! :) And please, let me know if you ever have any questions about any of my stuff. I'm always happy to help!

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  22. Hi Gretchen. I just finished making this for myself and i love it.
    I can see in prvious comments that you considered making a pattern for a hat/beanie. Did you manage to complete this?
    Many thanks for the great pattern,
    Adam

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    1. Hi Adam! You know, I didn't ever get around to it. I could easily write up a pattern for a basic one that matches, though! Give me a few days and I'll post one back. :)

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    2. Hi again! You can find a pattern below! :) Please let me know if there are any issues; I haven't knit it, and conceived of this one quite early in the morning so, while I think my math is right, I may just not yet be awake!!!

      Sailor’s Rib Hat

      Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large)

      Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #9458 Bainbridge Island Heather - 1 skein

      Needles: One 16” circular needle in size US 6, one 16” circular needle in size US 7, and one set of dpns in size US 7
      
      Notions: Tapestry needle

      Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

      Using your size US 6 circular needle, cast on 105 (115) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then knit the following ribbing row:

      Ribbing Row: * p1, k2, p1, k1; rep from *

      Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 2”. Transfer work to your size US 7 circular needle. Then we’ll move to our main pattern, as follows. Note that you can also skip the ribbing and start with the main pattern, although you will probably want to knit the first inch or two in a smaller needle size either way.

      Row 1: * p1, k2, p1, k1 *

      Row 2: * p1, k2, p1, k1 through back loop (k1-tbl) * 

      Row 3: * p4, k1 *

      Row 4: * p4, k1-tbl *

      Knit rows 1 – 4 until hat measures roughly 5.5” (6.5”) and you’ve just finished row 4 of the pattern. Then work the decrease, as follows. Notice that transition rows are given separately for each size before the remainder of the decrease begins below. Oh, and remember to switch to your dpns once you’re getting ready to drop below 80 stitches!

      Adult Small

      Transition Row 1 – Adult Small: * k19, k2tog * (100 stitches)

      Transition Row 2 – Adult Small: knit

      Adult Large

      Transition Row 1 – Adult Large: * k21, k2tog * (110 stitches)

      Transition Row 2 – Adult Large: knit

      Transition Row 3 – Adult Large: * k9, k2tog * (100 stitches)

      Transition Row 4 – Adult Large: knit

      Decrease – both sizes

      Decrease Row 1: * k8, k2tog * (90 stitches)

      Decrease Row 2: knit

      Decrease Row 3: * k7, k2tog * (80 stitches)

      Decrease Row 4: knit

      Decrease Row 5: * k6, k2tog * (70 stitches)

      Decrease Row 6: knit

      Decrease Row 7: * k5, k2tog * (60 stitches)

      Decrease Row 8: * k4, k2tog * (50 stitches)

      Decrease Row 9: * k3, k2tog * (40 stitches)

      Decrease Row 10: * k2, k2tog * (30 stitches)

      Decrease Row 11: * k1, k2tog * (20 stitches)

      Decrease Row 12: * k2tog * (10 stitches)

      Clip yarn tail, thread through remaining stitches, and pull tight. Thread to inside of hat and knot; tuck in ends.

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    3. Thank you. I look forward to trying it out

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    4. Great! Let me know how it turns out! :)

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  23. Thank you so much for the hat pattern! I am currently knitting cowls and hats for a Mongolian charity. The need is for warm, dark colored cowls as opposed to scarves because they can be pulled over the face. I found this pattern and I loved that it has some character to it, yet it is a fairly quick Knit. Now that I have the hat pattern, I will be making more pairs.

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    1. It sounds like you're doing good work! And that's exactly what I like about cowls too. :) Anyway, glad you're happy with the pattern - let me know if you ever have any questions! :)

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  24. Hi there!

    Just to let you know that I've blogged about your knitting pattern being involved in the AllFreeKnitting Father's Day Knitting Pattern competition (my pattern is in it too). You can see the post at http://littletheorem.blogspot.co.uk/2016/06/fathers-day-competition.html.

    Really love your pattern by the way, love a textured stitch pattern!

    Very best,
    Dot
    Littletheorem Knits

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    1. Hi Dot!

      Thanks for letting me know, I'll check out your post! And love your scarf, too! :)

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    2. Hey, thanks! Glad you like it! :D

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  25. found you the other day when i was looking for "standard" heights for cowls and i fell in love with this cowl!! i asked my husband and he says he will wear one so this is going to be on my needles soon. thanks so much!

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    1. Wonderful! I've seen lots of beautiful versions of this cowl on Ravelry, so I'm confident you'll create something lovely! Let me know if you have any questions. :)

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  26. Hi there, I'd love to knit this cowl for my bf, but was wondering how hard it would be to make fingerless gloves to match? Do you have any suggestions?

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    1. Yes, yes I do: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/2015/09/sailors-rib-fingerless-gloves.html

      Pew, pew, pew, pew (that was supposed to be finger guns. Let's just pretend it never happened)!

      And let me know if you have any questions!!! :)

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  27. Replies
    1. Yeah, in retrospect, I definitely shouldn't internet when I'm tired! :)

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  28. Bonjour
    J'adore votre modèle avez vous les explications en français?
    Cordialement
    Josc

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    1. Salut Josc!

      Je parle un peu de français, alors je peux vous aider. Je suggère utiliser Google Translate pour la pluparte de la texte, et puis me demander si vous avez plus de questions! Je suis là pour vous aider! :) Et, en premier:

      k = m. endr.
      p = m. env.
      k-tbl = tricotez dans le brin arrière de la maille (je ne suis pas sûre que c'est la traduction exact, mais c'est près!)

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    2. Merci beaucoup d'avoir pris le temps de me répondre
      pouvez vous me dire les dimensions car je voudrais le faire avec des aiguilles n°5/6
      Bonne soirée

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    3. Salut!

      Cette modèle est à peu prés 51 centimètres en cercle, mais c'est aussi très élastique. Si votre échantillon est différent de le mien, dites-le moi et je peux suggérer combien de mailles à monter!

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  29. I love this cowl and the pattern is really nice. But I want ot knit this for 2 toddler girls ( 2 and 5 years old), so I'm looking for the softest yet chunkiest yarn, because they hate my Lion's Quick & Easy chunky yarn, it stings them they say. I want to invest in a pricier yarn for its softness. What would you recommend please ? Have a great day !

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    1. That's easy!!! If I'm spending money on yarn, I'm spending it on Malabrigo!!!! :) I think the Mecha is the chunky one... And oh so pretty!!!

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  30. HIYA! I came upon this pattern and stopped in my tracks and grabbed my yarn and needles. So I have a question before I proceed. I've cast on 100 stitches. I use my first stitch to join so I have 99 stitches left. Wont I be a stitch short when I reach the end of the row? Hope this isn't a stupid question! Thanks, Belinda

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    1. Hi Belinda!

      Yes, if you use your first stitch to join then just knit the front and back of your final stitch instead of finishing with the p1, k1 and then continue in pattern... I promise you'll never notice the tiny, tiny difference on the finished product! :)

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    2. Thank you!! And for answering so quickly, now I can take my project along to work today!

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    3. Yay! Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  31. I am making napkin rings with this stitch. Which side is the front side?

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    1. Hi! Since this cowl is knit in the round, they're all the right side! To convert it to flat knitting you'll want to work as follows:

      Row 1 (right side): k1 through back loop (k1-tbl), * p1, k2, p1, k1-tbl; rep from *

      Row 2: p1, * k1, p2, k1, p1 *

      Row 3: k1-tbl, * p4, k1-tbl *

      Row 4: p1, * k4, p1 *

      Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  32. Hello! such a great pattern, i made one for my boyfriend and now i have to make these for each and everyone of his friends :)

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    1. Well, then, for your sake I hope he only has one or two friends... ;) And I'm glad you like the pattern!!!

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  33. OMG i just found your pattern. So the last row will end on Row 2? DO NOT end on Row 3 or 4 correct? I cant wait to do this!! MUAH!! Did you make a hat to this? I would really love a hat! FABULOUS PATTERN DARLING!

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    1. Hi there!

      Glad you like the pattern! :) And the only reason to end on row 2 is so that it's symmetrical top to bottom - if you end on another row I promise nothing bad will happen!!! Oh, and as far as the hat goes - I never posted one officially but if you look back up through the comments you can find a beanie pattern I posted when someone else asked me the same thing! :)

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