Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Wickerwork Hat

Wickerwork Hat

I stumbled across this yarn in my stash the other day and I realized that it would make the perfect gift for a friend who's about to move away. So I got right down to work and created this fun Wickerwork Hat, complete with pompom (there is a photo of it without the pompom below, in case you want to see it without). It would also make a great stash-busting holiday gift, since I think most of us have at least a skein or two of worsted-weight wool hanging around!

Sans pompom. In a different color, this would
make a nice man-hat as well.
Yarn: Patons Classic Wool (100% Pure New Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #202 (Cream) - one skein

Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 5, 16" circular needle in size US 8, one set of double pointed needles, also in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's get started! First, using your size 5 needle, cast on 104 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then, knit 1.5" in the following ribbing:

Ribbing Row: k1, * p2, k2; rep from *; end p2, k1

And once that's done, we'll switch to our size 8 needles and our main pattern, which is Wickerwork Pattern from page 146 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. For this pattern, we'll need the following notation:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

lt (left twist): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)

And we'll proceed like so:

Row 1: k1, * p2, k2 *; end p2, k1

Row 2: * k1, p1, rt, lt, p1, k1 *

Row 3: * k1, p1, k1, p2, k1, p1, k1 *

Row 4: * k1, rt, p2, lt, k1 *

Row 5: k2, * p4, k4 *; end p4, k2

Row 6: knit

Row 7: same as row 1

Row 8: * lt, p1, k2, p1, rt *

Row 9: * p1, k1, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1 *

Row 10: * p1, lt, k2, rt, p1 *

Row 11: p2, * k4, p4 *; end k4, p2

Row 12: knit

Knit rows 1 - 12 three times, and then it's time to begin our decreases. So let's proceed as follows:

Decrease Row 1: * k1, p1, ssk, k2tog, p1, k1*

Decrease Row 2: * k1, rt, lt, k1 *

Decrease Row 3: * k2, p2, k2 *

You'll want to switch to your dpns now, if you haven't already

Decrease Row 4: * k2tog, p2, ssk *

Decrease Row 5: slip first stitch from first dpn and slide to last dpn; then, * p2, k2tog *

Decrease Row 6: * p2tog, p1 *

Decrease Row 7: purl

Decrease Row 8: * p2tog *

Decrease Row 9: p1, * p2tog *

Clip tail and, using tapestry needle, thread through final 7 stitches. Pull tight, thread to inside of hat, and knot. Tuck in ends. If desired, make pompom and affix to hat. Put on and twirl happily.




80 comments:

  1. Thanks for this wonderful pattern and well written directions!

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    1. I'm so glad you like it! And if you have any questions, please let me know :)

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  2. Hi,

    Can this be knitted on straight needles not circular.
    Thanks

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    1. Hi!

      Unfortunately this particular pattern would require quite a bit of modification for straight needles. And in fact I haven't designed any hats that don't use circulars - maybe I'll add one to the list :)

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  3. I use straight needles and three days to finish this pretty hat. thanks for the sharing.

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    1. Are you the same commenter as before? Did you basically just go back and forth from the break and then seam it? Either way, I'm glad it worked out for you! :)

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  4. Have you tried making this for a toddler or child? If so, how would you change the pattern?

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    1. Hi!

      I have not made this hat in a smaller size; however, I think the easiest thing to do for a child size would be to knit it with yarn that gave you a gauge of 22 stitches per four inches (and using whichever size needle you needed to accomplish that for the main pattern and a needle two sizes smaller for the ribbing). You may need to trim 1/2" to 1" from the ribbing as well. For a toddler size you'd want more like 24 stitches per four inches, and a bit less ribbing if you want it to fit snugly on top (you can leave the ribbing the same if you want a bit of extra room on top, which would look good with the pompom anyway). Let me know if you have any more questions :)

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    2. if it's a 16 pattern repeat you can simply cut out by 16 or 8 stitches to reduce the size.

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  5. Are you using size 5 us or mm needles?

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    1. Hi Raylinda! US 5. I am trying to update my patterns with this information; I'll do this one now :)

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  6. If I need more stitches, in what increments can I add them for this pattern? Was the commenter above correct with 8 or 16?
    Thanks!
    Sarah

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    1. Hi Sarah! You can add increments of 8 in this pattern :) Let me know if you have any other questions!

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    2. Perfect! Thanks so much for your speedy reply!
      I'm excited to learn the new skill of twisting stitches. Thanks! :)

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    3. Of course! And twisting stitches is easy, fun, and opens a lot of doors, pattern-wise! I hope you enjoy it. :)

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  7. Super design for a hat. I generally find that a ribbing pattern works best for my preference if it's 4", for a turnback option. I have many balls of yarn needing some creative project. I hope this works on circulars, in the round and not having to use DPs-I can't get the hang of them.

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    1. I'm sure a rolled up brim would look great on this! And I've never tried it, but some people swear by the Magic Loop method if they don't like double pointed needles. Have you used this before?

      http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-knit-in-the-round-with-the-magic-loop.html

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  8. This hat looks great. What is the best way to make the pom pom?

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    1. Hello there! This is my preferred method: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/2014/06/how-to-make-yarn-pompom.html :)

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    2. I would like to make a scarf to match the hat. Do you have a pattern that would work with it?
      Thanks

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    3. Hello again! I do not have a scarf pattern to match; however, if you want the same pattern and everything, you could simply knit one as follows (this will have a 2 stitch garter edge and some ribbing at the ends, but will otherwise match patterns). I am assuming the same gauge.

      Using size US 6 straight needles, cast on 28 stitches and knit the following ribbing rows:

      Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): k2, p1 * k2, p2 * until you have 5 stitches left; then k2, p1, k2

      Ribbing Row 2: k3, * p2, k2 * until you have five stitches left; then p2, k3

      Knit rows 1 - 2 twice, switch to your size 8 needles, and then begin the main pattern, which goes as follows:

      Row 1 (wrong side): k2, p1 * k2, p2 * until you have 5 stitches left; then k2, p1, k2

      Row 2: k2, * k1, p1, rt, lt, p1, k1 * until you have 2 stitches left; then k2

      Row 3: k2, * p1, k1, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1 * until you have 2 stitches left; then k2

      Row 4: k2, * k1, rt, p2, lt, k1 * until have two stitches left; then k2

      Row 5: k2, p2, * k4, p4 * until you have 8 stitches left, then k4, p2, k2

      Row 6: knit

      Row 7: repeat row 1

      Row 8: k2, * lt, p1, k2, p1, rt * until you have 2 stitches left; then k2

      Row 9: k2, * k1, p1, k1, p2, k1, p1, k1 * until you have 2 stitches left, then k2

      Row 10: k2, * p1, lt, k2, rt, p1 * until you have 2 stitches left, then k2

      Row 11: k4, * p4, k4 *

      Row 12: knit

      Knit rows 1 - 12 until desired length is reached and you've just finished row 12 of the pattern. Switch to your size 6 needles. Then knit Ribbing Rows 1 & 2 twice and bind off loosely in pattern. Block, if desired.

      Hope that helps!

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    4. thank you for this scarf pattern,i have made the hat and love it....glad i saw and read the comments.

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    5. Awesome! Yeah, there are some gems in the comments sometimes. I'm glad you found it too (and that you love the hat!). :)

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    6. i´ve also jotted down all this info to make this in different colours with different wool thanks again xx

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    7. Wonderful! Let me know if you have any questions. :)

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  9. Thank you so much. I do have one more question though on how many balls of yarn I would need for the scarf.
    Thank you so much for all of your help. I really appreciate it.

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    1. You are very welcome! I would say that you'll need slightly less than 300 yards for the scarf. I should also mention that, as written, the scarf will be slightly less than 6" wide. If you'd prefer it a bit over 7", you should cast on 36 stitches instead. Then you'll need a bit more yarn, as well - perhaps just over 300! :)

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  10. Love this!! Made it with Cozy wool, size 8 and 10 needles with 56 stitches, came out awesome. Warm and soft and fits everyone since it has lots of stretch, thank you so much for this beautiful pattern!!

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    1. Oooh... I bet it's beautiful in a larger gauge! Glad to hear it worked out for you :)

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  11. Hey Gretchen!! New knitter here - dukeofpurl on Ravelry. Great hat and my daughter is hounding me to get it done. lol Stuck on Decrease Row5 :( Should be simple you'd think, but you know newbies!!! I'm on a "traveling loop" - i.e. Magic Loop with only one huge loop. At the beginning of round marker, I'm looking at a knit on my LH needle, and a knit on my RH needle. If I slip that LH stitch to the right - I'm pooched!! If I slip the RH stitch to the left, it doesn't look right either. Do you want the 2 knits to be purled and the 2 following purls to be k2tog? or visa versa? :/ Bloody newbie - right?? LOL .... TIA ....

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    1. Well hello there! It sounds like you have everything set up correctly from the previous row, so all you need to do is remove your row marker (I'm assuming you have one?), slip one stitch to your RH needle, and replace your marker. Then you should be set up to continue purling your purl stitches while knitting together the k2tog & ssk from the previous round. Basically all this does is move your hat seam over one stitch. Does that help? Oh, and I'm always happy to answer questions. Then maybe the newbies won't make as many mistakes as I did, starting out!!!

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    2. Duh!! How many times have I slipped a stitch doing a sock heel!! Never looked funky to me then!! Your explanation is _exactly_ what I first did - but for some dumb reason, it didn't look right to me! Maybe not enough coffee early in the AM? Anyway, Thanks A Bunch!! And BTW extra cute kids that you have there! Lucky you - all boys!!! rotfl ....

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    3. It happens to the best of us :) And thanks - yes, all boys, all cute, all noise, all the time. It's going to be a long winter!!!!

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    4. Been there!! Done that!! Raised 2 girls and 2 boys! :/ The boys wrestled and rolled around; then the girls jumped on! And the rumble was on! LOL Teach those boys to knit!! And cook!! They'll kiss your feet when they're adults!! ;)

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    5. It's funny you say that - my husband was just asking me when I'm going to teach the kids to knit! I think I'll start with finger knitting at my older son's kindergarten class and see how it goes...

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    6. Very cool!! Thx again ...

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  12. Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm delighted to hear it :) And if you're ever making any of my patterns and have questions, please let me know. I'm always happy to help!

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  13. Hi Gretchen! I am just starting row 1 of decreasing. Can you explain to me what ssk means? I have come to a standstill! Thanks!

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    1. Of course! An ssk (slip, slip, knit) is a left leaning decrease. Here is a link with more instruction: https://www.lionbrand.com/faq/80.html?language=

      In general, you can also find answers to terminology questions on my glossary page, here: http://www.ballstothewallsknits.com/p/glossary-of-knitting-terms.html

      Occasionally I am still missing stuff, however, and I don't mind answering questions! With that in mind, please let me know if you have any more :)

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  14. I totally love this pattern. I just started knitting a couple of months ago and I made one of these hats for my dad and one for his girlfried for christmas. They absolutely loved it.
    I had to use a different yarn because I live in Germany, but they still turned out nicely. Same for the Fan Lace Hat I made for a friend of mine.
    Your page is a great help and the instructions are very clear, even for a beginner like me.
    So thank you very much. ^_^
    Best wishes
    Tina

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    1. Yay! I'm so happy to hear that!!! :) I hope you continue to enjoy my patterns. And, as always, just let me know if you ever have any questions. I'm always happy to help!

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  15. Very neat pattern. But I'm a beginner. One question, for the left twist: when you skip a stitch in the back and knit the second one, do you push the right needle through from the right to the left? Thanks of for your help, Margaret

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    1. Hi Margaret!

      Yup, you've got it. It's basically just like you're knitting that second stitch through its back loop. Let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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    2. Oh aren't you fantastic with such a quick reply! Thank you so very much!

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  16. I just got back into knitting after about forty years away. I just finished making this hat for my adult daughter. We both love it, and it was so much fun to knit! Thank you!

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    1. Hi Cheryl!

      I'm so glad to hear that you enjoyed making this hat (and that you're knitting again!). And if you ever have any questions about any of my patterns, don't hesitate to let me know :)

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  17. This is a great pattern! Thank you very much.

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    1. I'm just happy to hear you like it! Thanks for your lovely compliment :)

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  18. Hi Gretchen,
    Gorgeous pattern, can't wait to get started with baby alpaca yarn! My daughter is very picky about having her hats fit snugly on the crown of her head. Previous hats that fit her perfectly measure 8.5" from brim to center crown. Might you have the finished measurements for this hat? Thanks so much for the pattern!

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    1. Hi Carol!

      As long as your gauge looks good, this hat should knit up to 8.5" almost exactly. :) Let me know if you have any more questions!

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    2. hi Gretchen, t
      Thanks for your response! Just curious: since the piece is knitted using size 8 needles, is it correct that the gauge is indicated using size 7 needles? Thanks again.
      Carol

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    3. Hi again!

      Good question! In general, I give gauges in the same size needles that the yarn package recommends - that way, when people are shopping for substitute yarns, it will give them a better idea of what to look for. So the long answer is: yes, that's correct. And more specifically, that means I knit this piece with slightly larger needles, although I didn't find it to affect length much. :)

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    4. Brilliant, thanks! I actually have a skein of Patons Classic Wool worsted in my stash (color Natural Mix) with which I plan to knit this hat, and indeed the suggested needle size is 7. THANK YOU so much for not only answering my question, but giving an explanation of the "why." I have bookmarked your site and will be eagerly poring over the thoughts and works you have so generously shared. :-D

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    5. I'm glad to hear it! And if you've got the same yarn, then I definitely think it should work out well for you. I'll keep my fingers crossed!

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  19. Row 9: no matter how focused I am to do correctly it keeps coming up one short at the end.

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    1. Hmm... I'm wondering if you lost a stitch somewhere. Since this pattern is repeated every eight stitches, I recommend looking back over each set of eight stitches to see if one of them only has seven. Your k2 in the middle should also line up with the previous row's k2; looking for issues with alignment may help you find the problem. Good luck!!!

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    2. 1st round it went fine, 2nd & 3rd it was off and counted. 2nd row I even tried to tink back then ended up dropping a purl stitch which was hard to figure out how to pick back up with twists and other stitches on either side or below. I'm new at this but managed to figure it out lucky. Since 3rd round row 9 was off so was row 10, I just added a knit stitch at the end. oh well if it's wearable I'll be happy with that by itself :)

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  20. When it says the complete rows 1-12 three times. Does that mean three times after doing it the first time, so four times? Or, two more times after doing it the first time, three total?

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    1. Hi again!

      It means three times total. And I remember how difficult it was to keep my stitches straight when I was just beginning. Don't worry - it definitely gets easier! In the meantime, you will just be making extra-unique goods! :)

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  21. Hello. I am a beginner knitter and learned to knit with straight needles. Is there any way to do this using straight needles? I really love this pattern and wanted to make a hat for my hubby. Thank you.

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    1. Hi Su!

      I can convert it for you, but you'll have to give me a few days. The baby is sick and I don't have much free time right now! And I'll simply post the pattern as a response to your comment when I'm done, so you won't have to look for it or anything :)

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    2. Hi again!

      The baby is starting to feel better, so I've had a chance to do this for you. As always when I convert patterns, though, I haven't knit it, so it's possible that I've made a mistake. If things stop looking like they should, please let me know!

      So let's get started! First, using your size 5 needle, cast on 106 stitches. Then, work the following ribbing:

      Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): p2, * k2, p2 *

      Ribbing Row 2: k2, * p2, k2; rep from *

      Knit ribbing rows 1 & 2 until ribbing measures roughly 1.5” and you’ve just finished row 2 of the pattern. And once that's done, we'll switch to our size 8 needles and our main pattern, which is Wickerwork Pattern from page 146 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. For this pattern, we'll need the following notation:

      rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again. Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

      lt (left twist): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)

      And we'll proceed like so:

      Row 1 (wrong side): p2, * k2, p2 *

      Row 2: k1, * k1, p1, rt, lt, p1, k1 *; end k1

      Row 3: p1, * p1, k1, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1 *; end p1

      Row 4: k1, * k1, rt, p2, lt, k1 *; end k1

      Row 5: p3, k4, * p4, k4 *; end p3

      Row 6: knit

      Row 7: same as row 1

      Row 8: k1, * lt, p1, k2, p1, rt *; end k1

      Row 9: p1, * k1, p1, k1, p2, k1, p1, k1 *; end p1

      Row 10: k1, * p1, lt, k2, rt, p1 *; end k1

      Row 11: p1, k2, p4, * k4, p4 *; end k2, p1

      Row 12: knit

      Knit rows 1 - 12 three times, and then it's time to begin our decreases. So let's proceed as follows:

      Decrease Row 1 (wrong side): p1, * p1, k1, p2tog, ssp, k1, p1 * (the ssp is the slip, slip, purl. You can find instructions for it here: http://www.twistcollective.com/collection/component/content/article/92-how-to/1141-slip-slip-purl-ssp (80 stitches)

      Decrease Row 2: * k1, rt, lt, k1 * (80 stitches)

      Decrease Row 3: p1, * p2, k2, p2 *; end p1 (80 stitches)

      Decrease Row 4: k1, * k2tog, p2, ssk *; end k1 (54 stitches)

      Decrease Row 5: p2tog, * p2, p2tog * (41 stitches)

      Decrease Row 6: k1, * p2tog, p1 *; end k1 (28 stitches)

      Decrease Row 7: purl (28 stitches)

      Decrease Row 8: k1, * p2tog *; end k1 (15 stitches)

      Decrease Row 9: p2, * p2tog *; end p1 (9 stitches)

      Transfer final 9 stitches to scrap of yarn for holding. Seam from bottom of hat – you should have a full stitch on either side that should get sucked into the seam. When you reach top of hat, thread seaming yarn through final 9 stitches and pull tight. Thread to inside of hat and knot. Tuck in ends. If desired, make pompom and affix to hat. Put on and twirl happily.

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  22. Hi Su,
    I am an advanced beginner knitter too, and I would strongly encourage you to be brave and take the plunge into knitting in the round! It's really easy once you get started, and will open up new worlds for you insofar as knitting hats, socks, etc. There is a book available in your local public library called "Circular Knitting Workshop: Essential Techniques for Knitting in the Round" that will get you off to an excellent start. Treat you to a few sets of circular and double-pointed needles, and off you go! You'll be amazed at the results. You can do this!

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  23. Su, and Gretchen,
    By the way, I just finished the Wickerwork hat ... it turned out beautifully in the Paton wool, and is now drying flat after an initial washing. Tip: wash in lukewarm water, and add a bit of hair conditioner to rinse water for an extra soft and non-itchy wool hat. :-)

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    1. HI Carol!

      I'm so glad to hear that this hat turned out well for you! :) And thanks for all of your circular knitting tips as well. I agree with you that it's a relatively easy technique that's completely worth the time and effort to learn, but I get lots of requests for converted patterns anyway. I think people don't realize how much less purling they have to do in the round...

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  24. Hi Gretchen!! I love this pattern and cannot wait to see the finished product. I'm a new knitter and I have a few questions before I get started...

    For the right twist: After knitting the two stitches together, to I transfer them back onto the left needle to re-knit the first? Then transfer that stitch back onto the left needle to slip both stitches onto the right needle?

    For the left twist: Same question. Do I slip the first stitch, knit the second, transfer both back to the left needle to knit them together?

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    1. Hello there!

      It's probably easiest if you just watch a video - here's a good one that shows both twists: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=isJY--558Fc

      And please, let me know if you have any other questions! :)

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  25. Hi there! I have just finished this gorgeous hat, and I would like to post a link of this pattern on my (brand new) blog.
    Really enjoyed this pattern, it was so much fun to make and it turned out so wonderful!
    Thanks, Fi (A Knit in the Life)
    aknitinthelife@gmail.com

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    1. Hi Fi!

      You are more than welcome to post a link to this pattern on your blog! :) Can't wait to see the hat.

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    2. Thank you very much indeed! I'll send you a link when I am through!
      Fi

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    3. This is my blog entry!
      https://aknitinthelife.wordpress.com/2015/05/15/current-projects-may-2015/
      Thanks again! Fi

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  26. I love this hat! Thanks for sharing this pattern.

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  27. Thank you for sharing your beautiful pattern.

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    1. You are very welcome! I have been happy to see that people are enjoying it as much as I did. :)

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