Showing posts with label worsted. Show all posts
Showing posts with label worsted. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Interrupted Stripe Cowl

Interrupted Stripe Cowl

Sometimes I want to make a fancy-pants project with an intricate stitch pattern and a lot of shaping. And sometimes I just want to make a basic, straightforward cowl while I watch bad television and put up my feet. The Interrupted Stripe Cowl is just such a project, using three colors of worsted weight yarn and nothing more complicated than your basic knit and purl. And the best part is that it still looks (at least a little bit) fancy!

Yarn: Berroco Fuji (38% Silk, 25% Cotton, 22% Rayon, 15% Nylon; 125 yards [115 meters]/50 grams); #9203 Sandy - one skein (color A), #9247 Pacific - one skein (color B), & #9263 Deep Sea - one skein (color C)

A close-up of the stripes. Interrupted.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! Using your color A yarn, then, cast on 110 stitches, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll continue like so: 

Row 1: using color A, knit

Row 2: using color A, purl

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Fun Lance Hat

Fun Lance Hat

Yes, the title of this pattern is a bit tongue-in-cheek. In fact, I named it for my brother-in-law, Lance, who was sad to discover that the Fan Lace Hat was not actually called the Fun Lance Hat, as he initially thought. But since I'm sending him this bad boy for the upcoming winter, I thought it would be a perfect name for this attractive, unisex hat. A word of warning, however - this hat may be less fun to knit than it is to wear if you're not handy with a cable needle, since you'll be cabling every other row. On the flip side, that just gives you an opportunity to learn to cable without a cable needle, if you're ready to pick up a new skill!

Yarn: Malabrigo Rios (100% Merino Superwash; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #43 Plomo - one skein

The finish. It's handsome, no?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 7, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7, and one cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's make a fun (and fancy) Lance hat, shall we? To get started, then, using your size US 5 circular needle, cast on 112 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some ribbing rows as follows:

Ribbing Row: * (p2, k2) three times, p2; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 8 times. Then, switch to your size 7 circular needle, and we'll begin the main pattern, which includes panels of Wave of Honey Stitch from page 272 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. To work it, we'll use the following notation:

front cross (fc): slip 1 stitch to cn and hold in front; k1; k1 from cn

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Tropical Twist Hat

Tropical Twist Hat

First off, I have to say it: I've been having a great time taking my knitting photos in my yard, even if my neighbors now think I'm nuts (and they definitely do). But I don't care, because the Tropical Twist Hat looks great out in the wild. Sure, it's nothing fancy - just some alternating cables - but it's a nice, clean, unisex design that takes variegation well. And sometimes, that's all you need!

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash Paints (100% Hand Painted Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #9859 Tropical Punch - one skein

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6, and one cable needle (cn) or dpn for cabling (or you can always cable without a needle, if you'd prefer)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a hat! First, then, using your circular needle, cast on 120 stitches, place marker, and join in round. If you want to get really fancy, you could knit the first five or six rows in a smaller gauge needle to create a tighter brim, but it's certainly not necessary. Either way you do it, we'll get straight to the main pattern, after a little notation as follows:

front cross (fc): slip 2 stitches to your cn and hold in front; k2; k2 from cn

left twist (lt): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)

And now that we've covered that, let's get to it!

Rows 1 & 2: * p1, k4, p2, k4, p1; rep from *

Row 3: * p1, k4, p2, fc, p1 *

Rows 4 - 8: * p1, k4, p2, k4, p1 *

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Pollyanna Purse

Pollyanna Purse

I've been itching to do another bag ever since I finished the Funner Summer Beach Bag, in large part because I've been bursting with design ideas. And I'm pleased to report that the Pollyanna Purse represents many of them, including faux i-cord edgings in both the strap and the sides and a seamless design. Long story short, it's both sturdy and cute and a reasonably easy knit despite its kinda-fancy design features.

Yarn: Lily Sugar 'n Cream (100% Cotton; 120 yards [109 meters]/70.9 grams); #01215 Robin's Egg - 2 skeins (color A), and #01322 Lilac - 1 skein (color B)

A closer picture of the front middle of the purse.
That's a thing, right? The "front middle"?
Needles: One 24" or longer circular needle in size US 7, one set of straight needles, also in size US 7, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7, as well as size US 9 or 10 needles for provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle, 6 stitch markers

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 7 needles

So let's get started! First, then, let's discuss the structure of this bag - you'll begin by knitting the bottom of the bag & strap (which are connected in a continuous loop). Once that's done, you'll pick up stitches along the edges to create the sides of the bag. So with that in mind, using your larger needle, a provisional cast on, and your color B yarn, cast on 23 stitches loosely. Transfer work to your size 7 straight needles, and then continue as follows:

Row 1 (right side): using color B, knit

Row 2: using color B, k1, slip 3 stitches with yarn in front (wyif), p15, slip 3 wyif, k1

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Honey Cowl

Honey Cowl

I know summer hasn't even technically begun yet, but I figure there are at least a few of you who are already planning for fall. With that in mind, the Honey Cowl is made from a worsted-weight cotton-mix yarn and worked on large needles to give it a little bit more of a relaxed appearance. And while it might be difficult to tell from the pictures, the basketweave pattern that I've chosen for the main design is also a mesh, which gives this design a very unique look. Long story short, this cuddly cowl is perfect for the shoulder seasons, and would work well in most cotton- or acrylic-based worsted weight yarns!

Yarn: Berroco Remix (30% Nylon, 27% Cotton, 24% Acrylic, 10% Silk, 9% Linen; 216 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #3953 Burnt Orange - one skein

A closeup of the basketweave.
Plus some really terrible lighting.
Apologies.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5 (there are a lot of stitches to begin with, so if you don't like knitting on full circulars you might want to start with a 24" or a 20" instead), cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches on size 8 needles

So let's get started! First, then, cast on 119 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then, we'll knit a marker placement/set-up row, as follows:

Marker Placement Row: p16, place marker, p1, k8, p1, place marker, p67, place marker, p1, k8, p1, place marker, purl until end of round

And now, we'll begin incorporating our main pattern, which is Open Basketweave Mesh from page 252 of Barbara G. Walker's Charted Knitting Designs: A Third Treasury of Knitting Patterns, a cable, and some decreases. Oh, and we'll need the following notation:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again. Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

lt (left twist): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)


bc (back cross): slip next 2 stitches to cn and hold in back, k2, k2 from cn

fc (front cross): slip next 2 stitch to cn and hold in front, k2, k2 from cn

And now that that's out of the way, let's proceed as follows:

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Funner Summer Beach Bag

Funner Summer Beach Bag

Yeah, I know "funner" isn't a word. But my kids don't, and that was the inspiration for this brightly striped, cleverly constructed (in my opinion, at least!) bag. Designed seamlessly with faux i-cords for structure and a fun lace pattern, this is one of the sturdier and prettier knit bags you'll find. Knit it, and you'll make your summer more fun. Or, you know, go to the water slides or something like that instead. Your call. :)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Whitney (91% Cotton, 9% Nylon; 87 yards [89 meters]/50 grams); #1001 Natural - three skeins (color A), #1009 Cranberry - two skeins (color B)

The lace pattern. So purty!
Needles: One set of double pointed needles in size US 8, one 16" circular needle in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, 9 stitch markers

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches 

So let's make a bag! First, then, I should mention that any time you're slipping stitches in this bag, you're pulling the yarn tight behind them. This will help to create that faux i-cord rib, and the edges of the strap. I should also mention that this bag is worked bottom-up. So with that in mind, using your color A yarn and your dpns, cast on 8 stitches loosely, divide evenly between four dpns, and join in round. Then we'll work a few set-up rows, as follows:

Set-up Row 1: using color A, * p1, m1r, p1; rep from * (+4 stitches)

Set-up Row 2: using color A, * p1, slip 1 with yarn in back (wyib), p1 *

Set-up Row 3: using color A, * p1, m1r, k1, m1l, p1 * (+8 stitches)

Once these three set-up rows are done, we'll knit a marker placement row, as follows:

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Butterfly Eyelet Hat

Butterfly Eyelet Hat

As a woman who has had short hair the majority of her life, I rarely find myself needing a very slouchy hat (and thus often design beanies). But sometimes I remember that the rest of you may very well have crazy, messy, big hair that needs a big ol' hat to go on top of it. And that's why I designed the Butterfly Eyelet Hat, which has enough stretch and length to fit over a long, luscious 'do (or just to accent a short one). Anyway, if there's anyone out there who likes the pattern but would prefer a snugger fit to their hat, just hit me up in the comments and we'll see what we can do!

Yarn: Cascade 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #1940 Peach – one skein (color A) and #910A Winter White - one skein (color B)

The pattern. Cute little eyelets, eh?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 7, one set of double-pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 7 needles

So let's make a hat! First, then, using your size 5 needle and your color A yarn, cast on 112 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following ribbing row to get started:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k2, p2; rep from *

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Feathered Arrow Headband

Feathered Arrow Headband

One of knitting's greatest challenges (in my opinion, at least) is finding a good way to use your yarn scraps. I never have the heart to throw them away, after all, and then I never have quite enough yarn to do anything really spectacular with my leftovers. Luckily, the humble headband can be a great solution to this problem - quick, fun, and gratifying to knit, they're also highly wearable and a great gift. Case in point: the Feathered Arrow Headband, which uses less than 50 yards of yarn and is easy to customize for teens to adults.

Yarn: Patons Classic Wool (100% Pure New Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #202 (Cream) - one skein
The pattern.
Subtle, but niiiiice.


Needles: straight needles in size US 8, straight needles in size US 10 (for provisional cast-on)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a headband! First, then, using your size 10 needles and a provisional cast on, cast on 17 stitches loosely. Then, we'll move straight to our size US 8 needles and our main pattern, which is Expanded Feather Pattern from page 194 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Nom Nom Garter Hat

Nom Nom Garter Hat

You may be wondering why this thing is called the Nom Nom Garter Hat. The answer to that question is simple - it's because it will eat up your yarn scraps like "nom nom nom!" Before we get started, however, I should tell you a couple of things - first of all, you need roughly 50 yards each of your two main colors in order to get this hat going. Provided you have that, you can do your accent colors with quite small amounts of any worsted- or dk-weight yarns (or smaller, if you hold two strands together!). Also, I wrote my color combination out here so that you could make the hat with the exact same color scheme, if you wanted. Please, however, feel free to ignore my accent coloring (colors C - J), and do your own instead! If you choose to do this, however, you'll definitely want to pay attention to the length of the stockinette stripe on this hat - it is a better indication of the finished length than the garter stitch. To make the color pop, after all, you'll be blocking the snot out of this thing, and the garter will stretch a LOT.

Oh, and last but not least - I designed this hat back-and-forth, both for my peeps who avoid circular knitting, and because that's the only way to truly take advantage of the garter stitch. If you need help converting the pattern for circular knitting, just ask!

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #1948 Mystic Purple - one skein (color A), #908 Magenta - one skein (color B) & various scrap yarns in worsted & dk weights (colors C - J) - roughly 50 yards total

This is how I kept my colors straight!
My children thought I was working on a cool
art project, at least.
Needles: straight needles in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette, 16 stitches = 4 inches in garter

So let's get started! First, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 82 (90) stitches. Then we'll work the edging rows like so:

Row 1: using color A, p3, knit until you have 3 stitches left in row, p3

Row 2: using color C, knit

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Beauty of a Basketweave Hat



Beauty of a Basketweave Hat

Recently, AllFreeKnitting offered me the opportunity to review this yarn, Brown Sheep Company's Lanaloft, and design an exclusive pattern for their site. And obviously, since I'm only human (and cannot resist the thought of receiving yarn IN THE MAIL like it's freaking magic), I jumped at the chance. For now, you'll have to visit their site to find the pattern, though. You can find more pictures and the link below. :)

Yarn: Brown Sheep Company, Inc. Lanaloft (100% Wool; 160 yards [146 meters]/100 grams); LL83W Victorious Violet – 1 skein

That, my friends, is a basketweave.
Needles: one 16” circular needle in size US 7, one 16” circular needle in size US 8, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 8

Notions: stitch marker, tapestry needle

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches on size US 8 needles

As promised, then, you can find the rest of the pattern here. Make it, and be merry!

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Minky Mittens

Minky Mittens

I've been plotting another pair of mittens for awhile now. In fact, I've been plotting them for so long that I didn't manage to complete them until our first spring-ish week here in Wisconsin (oops). While my timing is terrible, however, these mittens are not; made with a slip stitch color pattern, they are thick and warm, and can be sized from toddlers to adults. Now I just have to hope my kids don't grow out of them before next winter...

Sizes: Toddler (Child Small; Child Medium; Child Large/Adult Small; Adult Medium; Adult Large)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #1946 Silver Grey - one skein (color A), #810 Teal - one skein (color B for the toddler sized mittens) & #9863 Spring Meadow - one skein (color B for the children's small mittens)

The pattern. Plus an eye! Notice how the variegated color B
yarn changes the look of the mitten.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's do this thang! Using your size 5 needles and your color A yarn, cast on 30 (34; 36; 40; 44; 48) stitches and divide evenly between 3 dpns. Join in round. Then knit the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures 1.5" (1.5"; 1.75"; 2.25"; 2.25"; 2.5"). Then switch to your size 7 needles and knit one row around, still in your color A yarn. And once that's done, we'll work a few more rows before we gusset in the thumb, as follows:

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Diana's Cowl

Diana's Cowl

The story behind this cowl is simple: a lovely friend sent me a wonderful Galentine's Day package, and I wanted to reciprocate with a knit good (or a good knit! See what I did there? Yes, I'll show myself out...). Anyway, she gave me the item and the color, and I designed something that (I hope) will suit her perfectly. And while this particular item is made extra-scrumptious by the alpaca yarn, I think a cotton or silk would also suit it well.

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Pure Alpaca (100% Baby Alpaca; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #3003 Ruby - one skein

The pattern. It's got holes!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's do this! First, cast on 91 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following marker placement row:

Marker Placement Row: k1, (p1, k1) 17 times, place marker, k21, place marker, k1, * p1, k1; rep from * until end of round

And now we'll move on to a few edging rows that begin to use our pattern, which incorporates a strip of Double Herringbone Mesh from page 301 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Edging Row 1: p1, * k1, p1 * until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, (yo, ssk) 3 times, yo, slip 1-k2tog-psso, (yo, k2tog) 4 times, yo, k2, slip marker, p1, * k1, p1 *

Edging Row 2: k1, * p1, k1 * until you reach first marker, slip marker, knit until next marker, slip marker, k1, * p1, k1 *

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Lace Cable Fingerless Gloves

Lace Cable Fingerless Gloves

First and foremost: I highly recommend against viewing these photos larger. We are in the middle of a cold, dry winter here in Wisconsin, and my hands are SCARY. Luckily, not everything is quite so terrifying. And that includes these gloves, which are designed and knit on straight needles for all of my dpn-despising peeps. Of course, if one of my dpn-loving peeps wants to see this pattern adapted for the round, just hit me up in the comments and I'll help you out too!

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium a hand about 8" - 9", and the large 9" +)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Heathers (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #9461 Lime Heather - one skein

A close up of the pattern.
Leafy, no?
Needles: One set of needles in size US 7, one set of needles in size US 5, one cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's get started! We're going to work our two gloves a teensy weensy bit differently (the cables will be reversed). So, for the first one, you'll start by using your size 5 needles, and casting on 38 (42; 46) stitches loosely. Then we'll work the following ribbing rows, which will be the same for all sizes:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): p2, * k2, p2; rep from *

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Iris Bloom Bonnet

Iris Bloom Bonnet

First and foremost: yes, this yarn is divine. Simply heavenly. Gorgeous, lovely to knit, and beautifully variegated. But even if you don't have or can't find this particular fiber, you're in luck, because I have a sneaking suspicion that this super fun hat would look great in almost any worsted weight yarn. And if that's not incentive enough to make this hat, then consider this: I actually wrote up two patterns for this little beauty - one version that includes knitting in the round, and one that's made entirely on straight needles. Both begin in the same way, below. 

Note as of 11/24/15: This hat fits like an adult small. I have adapted the in-the-round version of the pattern for an adult large in the comments below. :)

Yarn: Malabrigo Rios (100% Merino Superwash; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #416 Indiecita - one skein

This stitch pattern makes me wanna say "yeah!"
My kids would be so embarrassed.

Needles: One set of straight needles in size US 5, one set of straight needles in size US 7, one 16" circular needle in size US 7, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7 (if you're knitting it entirely on straight needles, you don't need the circulars or dpns)

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's get started! For either version of this hat, we'll be working from the brim of the piece, and we'll begin by working back and forth rather than in the round. As such, using your straight needles in size US 5, cast on 118 stitches loosely. Then work the following rows:

Edging Row 1 (wrong side): p2, * k2, p2; rep from *

Edging Row 2: k2, * p2, k2 * 

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Little Ridges Fauxflap Hat

Little Ridges Fauxflap Hat

There are only a few notes with this hat - first off, yes, I've gotten obsessed with earflap hats. They're so cute! Etc. Of course, this one isn't a true earflap hat, since the flaps are worked with shaping instead of separately to give it a different twist. And secondly, my gauge didn't match the package on this hat. And as always with a hat that's knit mostly in stockinette, that's actually important to know.

Sizes: Child (Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Berroco Vintage (52% Acrylic, 40% Wool, 8% Nylon; 218 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #5160 Wild Blueberry (color A) – one skein &
#5177 Douglas Fir – one skein (color B)

A closer view of the pattern
Needles: one 16" circular needle in size US 7, and one set of double-pointed needles (dpns) in size US 7, plus one size US 9 or larger 16" circular needle for provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle, five stitch markers

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's get started! Using your largest needle and your color A yarn, cast on 80 (90; 100) stitches provisionally (instructions for this cast on can be found here). Transfer stitches to your size 7 needle, place marker, and join in round. Then knit the following set-up rows:

Set-up Rows 1 & 2: using color A, knit

And now it's time to move to our color pattern, which goes as follows:

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Doug Fir Mittens

 
Doug Fir Mittens

I don't have a terribly entertaining story about these mittens, but I'll tell it anyway. First, I wanted to design a pair. Then, I did. And though the Doug Fir Mittens are definitely on the basic side, they also have a few nice features. The cuffs, for instance, are long enough to tuck into your jacket and keep your wrists warm. Plus, the tops are nice and tapered! With any luck, I'll also be adding some kid sizes soon, although these are only sized for adults.

Sizes: Small Adult (Medium Adult; Large Adult) (the small is for a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 7" from base of palm to fingertips, and the large for a hand roughly 8 1/2" - 9" in circumference at the base of the thumb and 8" from base of palm to fingertips - and finally, go medium if you're between)

Yarn: Berroco Vintage (52% Acrylic, 40% Wool, 8% Nylon; 218 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #5177 Douglas Fir – one skein (all sizes)

The thumb join. Yup, looks like a thumb.
Needles: one set of double-pointed needles (dpns) in size US 7, one set of dpns in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's get started! Using your size 5 needles, cast on 40 (40; 44) stitches and then distribute the stitches between your needles as follows: 12 stitches on the first needle, 16 stitches on the second needle, and 12 stitches on the third needle (12 stitches on the first needle, 16 stitches on the second needle, and 12 stitches on the third needle; 14 stitches on the first needle, 16 stitches on the second needle, and 14 stitches on the third needle). Join in round, and then proceed as follows:

Ribbing Row 1: * p1, k2, p1; rep from *

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Belt Welt Hat

Belt Welt Hat

First, I should mention that I'm pretty sure this is the most expensive skein of yarn I've ever purchased, and it was WORTH EVERY PENNY! So smooth, so wonderful to knit - seriously, I would take a bath in the stuff if I could afford it. Luckily, you don't have to use this luxurious of a yarn to make this pattern pop - any heavier weight worsted should do. But perhaps the best thing about this pattern is that it's a pretty simple knit that still yields a lot of graphic appeal. Or in other words, you won't have to put in a lot of work in order to end up with a hat that you'll be pleased with.

Sizes: Small Adult (Large Adult)

Yarn: Simplinatural by HiKoo by Skacel (40% Baby Alpaca, 40% Fine Merino Wool, 20% Mulberry Silk; 183 yards [167 meters]/100 grams); #098 Bright Blue – one skein (both sizes)

The finish.
Needles: one 16" circular needle in size US 6, one 16" circular needle in size US 8, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 8 (one 16" circular needle in size US 7, one 16" circular needle in size US 9, one set of dpns, also in size US 9)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches on size 8 needles, 16 stitches = 4 inches on size 9 needles

So let's get one thing straight, here. The only difference between the size small hat the large is needle size - if you want to make a small hat, use 6s and 8s. If you want a large hat, use 7s and 9s! And now that we've got that taken care of, using your smaller circular needle, cast on 90 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: * p1, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures 4". And now, it's time to switch to your larger needles and the main pattern, which is Belt Welt from page 6 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Saturday, January 10, 2015

Double Pom Earflap Hat

Double Pom Earflap Hat

As I've mentioned before, every once in a while, one of my children decides that they need something new and then pesters me until I make it for them. Such was the case with this hat. My three-year-old has a friend with a double pompom hat; hence, he needed one too. Luckily, he is less picky than my five-year-old, and let me pick the stitch pattern. And this two-color design looks fantastic in person and adapts perfectly to the round. Oh, and did I mention that I've sized this hat to fit everyone from toddler to adult as well???*

* I've also updated the marker placement rows of this pattern as of January 14, 2016 (they were missing a marker!).

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Cascade 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #809 Really Red – one skein (color A) and #871 White - one skein (color B) (all sizes)

The pattern. It's a winner!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 7, one set of double-pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7 (for working the i-cords), one US 9 or larger needle for provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker, stitch holders or scrap of yarn for holding stitches

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 7 needles

So let's get started! Using your large needle, your color A yarn and a provisional cast on, cast on 90 (96; 102; 108) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Transfer work to your 16" size 7 circular needle and knit four rows around. Switch to your color B yarn and knit one row around. And now, it's time to begin our pattern, which is Cage Pattern from page 65 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, and goes as follows:

Row 1: using your color A yarn, * slip 2 with yarn in back (wyib), k4; rep from * 

Row 2: using your color A yarn, * slip 2 wyib, p4 *

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

I Dream of Beaches Cowl

I Dream of Beaches Cowl

A reader recently asked me if I had any true infinity style cowls, and I had to say no. And while this cowl isn't technically an infinity cowl either, you could totally make it that way! I even provide instructions! Whether you create a Möbius strip with this thing or not, however, it's a nice, completely seamless lightweight cowl that will suit either the winter or the spring that will eventually come. So whenever you wear it, you can dream of beaches...

Yarn: Berroco Fuji (38% Silk, 25% Cotton, 22% Rayon, 15% Nylon; 125 yards [115 meters]/50 grams); #9203 Sandy - 2 skeins

The back. Seamless, I tell ya!
Needles: One set of needles in size US 7, one set of needles in size US 10, and one cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's get started! As I mentioned, this piece is perfectly seamless, which means we'll be starting with a provisional cast on. Using your size 10 needle, then, cast on 30 stitches provisionally. Transfer stitches to your size 7 needle, and then proceed as follows with some set up rows, as you'll find below. Oh, and here's the notation we'll need:

front cross (fc): slip 4 stitches to cn and hold in front; k4; k4 from cn

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Coin & Medallion Hat

Coin & Medallion Hat

Everything about this hat was inspired by the yarn, since the color strikes me as a perfect match for the coin and medallion cables. And not only is this stuff a gorgeous shade, it also has a lovely feel, as buttery as the hue. I will note, however, that if you're making this hat for a larger-headed person, you will probably want to use a slightly heavier weight worsted, or even a light chunky (think more like 16 stitches per four inches). You can size your needles up as needed.

Yarn: Malabrigo Worsted (100% Merino Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #022 Sauterne – one skein

Needles: one 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size 9, and one cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, 3 stitch markers

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches on size 8 needles

Edit as of 3/07/15: Raveler sandeleh has very kindly created charts for this hat, which you can find as images at the bottom of this post. The only note is that the cables in the chart do not contain twisted stitches, while as in the written pattern, they do. You can twist or not twist at your leisure. Also, row 1 of the chart is the ribbing row - you will, naturally, want to repeat it more than once, as directed. And please just email if you want a bigger version of the charts (ballstothewallsknits@gmail.com). Thanks again sandeleh!!! :)

So let's get started! Using your size 6 needle, cast on 96 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work on the ribbing row, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1, (k2, p2) twice, k2, p1, (k2, p2) twice, k2, p1 * 

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures about 1 1/4", and then switch to your size 9 needle. Now, it's time to begin our main pattern, which is a combination of Coin Cable and a modified version of Tyrolean Medallion, from Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns (on pages 261 and 247, respectively). To do these, let's first define some terms.