Showing posts with label worsted. Show all posts
Showing posts with label worsted. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Four Winds Hat

Four Winds Hat

Okay, I should begin any description of this hat with an admission: that I bought the yarn for my husband, and originally intended to design this bad boy for him. Then, however, the yarn told me that it didn't want to belong to him, it wanted to belong to me instead. And then it said that this was the form that it dreamed of taking...

... sure, I'm exaggerating a bit. Truly, though, this design was 100% inspired by the fiber, and creates a very plush, delicious hat because of the twisted stitch pattern. Of course, since ALL of the stitches are twisted every other row it's a tad annoying to work, but I think the end result is definitely worth it!

Yarn: Malabrigo Worsted (100% Merino Wool; 210 yards [191 meters]/100 grams); #56 Olive - one skein 

A closer look at the stitch pattern and the
crown.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6, one 16" circular needle in size US 9, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 9

Notions: Tapestry needle, four stitch markers

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 8 needles (I'm giving you package gauge in case you're using a substitute yarn)

Okay, so let's make a hat! To start with, then, using your size US 6 needle, cast on 100 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, we'll knit the following marker placement row:

Marker Placement Row: (k1, [p1, k1] x 12, place marker) three times; then, k1, * p1, k1; rep from * until you reach the end of the row

Knit this marker placement row. Then we'll work our ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: (k1, * p1, k1; rep from * until you reach next marker, slip marker) four times

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures just over 2". Then, transfer work to your size US 9 circular needle, and continue to work as follows. Notice that you'll need the following terminology to continue:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Gathered Rib Scarf

Gathered Rib Scarf
Gathered Rib Scarf

Okay, I wish I had a good story behind this scarf, but I don't. Basically, I've just been on kind of a variegated yarn kick lately, in part because I find it super difficult to find good patterns for but I love buying it, so... you do the math! Someone's gotta come up with some stuff, right? Anyway, I designed this particular scarf to be on the shorter side, since I only had 2 skeins of yarn. However, it would look very nice if you have a bit more yardage to work with, also, or even in a solid color yarn! 

Yarn: Lana Grossa Cinque Multi (60% Virgin Wool, 40% Polyacrylic; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #013 - two to three skeins

Gathered Rib Scarf
A better look at the rib,
and the gathering. See how it
works with the variegation???
Needles: Straight needles in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

And now that we've got all of that covered, let's make a scarf! To begin with, then cast on 50 stitches loosely. Then, we'll work as follows:

Rows 1, 3, 5, & 7 (wrong side): slip 1 stitch purlwise with yarn in back (sl1 wyib), k1, (p6, k4) four times, p6, k2

Rows 2, 4, & 6: slip 1 stitch purlwise with yarn in front (sl1 wyif), p1, (k6, p4) four times, k6, p2

Row 8: sl1 wyif, p1, (k2tog through back loops [k2tog-tbl], k2, k2tog, p4) four times, k2tog-tbl, k2, k2tog, p2

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Swiss Check Scarf

Swiss Check Scarf

If I had one inspiration for this scarf, it was the planned color pooling pictures that keep popping up in my Facebook feed (dude, I follow a lot of knitters). If I had two inspirations for this scarf, it was PCP (such a bad acronym!) and laziness; the idea of fiddling with a yarn and a design until I had nailed a certain color pattern seemed about as appealing to me as taking all three of my children to the dentist by myself for concurrent appointments. So I went with a more relaxed take on the same theme; namely, a slip stitch color pattern worked with two skeins of the same variegated yarn that still creates a fancy pattern but requires much less precision! :)

Yarn: Lang Yarns Viva (100% Merino Wool; 120 yards [110 meters]/50 grams); #0020 - four skeins

A closer look at the Swiss Check.
So Swiss, no?
Needles: One pair of straight needles in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 19 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

And now that we've gotten the basics down, let's make a scarf! And let's begin by talking some shop: specifically, addressing the fact that this scarf is worked with two skeins of your variegated yarn at once, and that even though they're the SAME DARN COLOR (or combination of colors I suppose), I will be calling one skein A and one skein B. Of course, that's because they need to be worked alternately in order to produce the slip stitch color pattern (and for that reason I also recommend that you make sure to begin the slip stitch pattern with a portion of your skein B ball that does not match your skein A ball at whichever point in the dye you're in after the edging rows). So let's proceed as follows:

Using your skein A yarn (aka any whichever one of your skeins you pick up first), cast on 39 stitches loosely and work the edging rows as follows:

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

True Blue Shawlette

True Blue Shawlette
True Blue Shawlette

On most occasions, I try to keep my knitting fairly seasonal (or representative of the months to come). I'm sure that's why I bought this yarn and started this shawlette months ago, only to get hung up by my uncooperative forearms. Now that I've finally finished the piece, though, we should all just pretend it's summer again, and that the cold breeze I felt this afternoon was actually as balmy as July's winds. Or not, in which case you can file this pattern away for next year, when you've got 300+ yards of a cotton-, silk-, linen-, or bamboo-based fiber and a hankering for a short shawl (or even a big one, if you want to keep working and you've got enough yarn!).

Yarn: Lana Grossa 365 Cotone (88% Cotton, 12% Polyamide; 153 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #026 Türkisgrün - two skeins

True Blue Shawlette
A better look at the pattern.
Basically, just lace and garter stitch!
Needles: One 32" or longer circular needle in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a little shawl thing! And in case I wasn't clear enough before, this pattern is good for those occasions when you're not sure if you've got enough yarn or not; since it's designed from the rounded bottom up, it's completely scalable in size - make it small if you've only got 300 yards, or bigger with more. No matter how much yarn you've got, however, you'll begin by casting on 3 stitches loosely, and then working 8 rows in garter stitch to create a tab of sorts. Then, without turning work, yarn over (yo) twice, pick up 1 stitch about 1/3rd of the way down along the edge of the tab, (yo) twice again, pick up 1 stitch roughly 2/3rds of the way down the edge of the tab, and (yo) twice again. Complete tab by picking up 3 stitches along cast-on edge; you should now have stitches coming from 3 sides of the tab - 3 along original working edge - 8 along the side (counting each double yo as 2 stitches), and 3 along the cast-on edge. Then, work a few set-up rows as follows:

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Friend of the Forest Hood

Friend of the Forest Hood
Size Medium

This particular design represents a perfect confluence of events; first, I got a request for a hooded cowl with a rounded crown, and then I found this rather spectacular alpaca yarn in the sale bin at my local yarn shop and knew that it would be perfect for the job. And if that isn't delightful enough, I also played a harrowing game of yarn chicken and managed to finish this medium size hood with just two skeins of the yarn. As you'll notice, however, I recommend a bit extra if you're making this size - unless, of course, you like to live as dangerously as I do. ;)

Sizes: Small (Medium; Large) (Small is perfect for toddlers & young children; medium for large children, teens, and small adults; large for large adults or simply a fuller-fitting hood)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Alta Moda Alpaca (90% Alpaca, 5% Virgin Wool, 5% Polyamide; 153 yards [140 meters]/50 grams); #035 Lime Sherbet - 2 skeins (3 skeins; 3 skeins)

A better look at the back finish.
Short rows give it a nice rounded seam.
Needles: one 16" circular needle in size US 9, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 9 for three needle bind off (you can also use regular straight needles and your circular needle for your third)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hood thingy thing! And let's start by casting on 96 (108; 120) stitches loosely, placing marker, and joining it in the round. Next, purl four rows around as edging. And once that's done, knit until knit section measures roughly 4" (4.5"; 5"). Then we'll work a few transition rows, as follows:

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Ridge and Furrow Cowl

Ridge and Furrow Cowl
Ridge and Furrow Cowl

You know how you can walk by the same spot a million times and still not notice what's there? That's exactly what I realized had happened to me when I discovered another local yarn shop, this one just a four minute bus ride from my house. And if that discovery weren't great enough on its own, I discovered that said local yarn shop ALSO has a lovely sale section, which facilitated the pattern for this 100% silk cowl that's both basic and fun (not to say that sale yarn -- or even silk yarn -- is required for your own).

Yarn: Lana Grossa Linea Pura Soloseta (100% Silk; 109 yards [100 meters]/50 grams); #001 Light Gray Mix - 2 skeins

Ridge and Furrow Cowl
Another look at the pattern.
It reminds me of a field!
Needles: One 24" circular needle in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 19 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 8 needles

And with that out of the way, let's make a cowl! First, then, cast on 110 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll move straight to the pattern, which is a basic combination of seed stitch and a yo/decrease combination, and goes like so:

Row 1: * p1, (k1, p1) three times, k3; rep from *

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Little Check Market Bag

Little Check Market Bag

If you follow me on Instagram then you probably know why this post has been so long in the making: we've been traveling, and anyone who's able to travel with small children and also knit is far more talented than I (it doesn't help that my little one is the Houdini of hotel rooms). Luckily, I left this little beauty blocking while I was gone, so I had at least one nice thing to come home to. Speaking of the bag, I should also mention that it follows my standard rules of knitted bags, since it's both functional (faux i-cords in the body and the handles help to prevent stretching) and fun (imagine it with even more colors!). And heck, maybe it's even functional and fun enough to use on my next trip... :)

Yarn: Lang Yarns Presto (50% Cotton, 50% Acrylic; 71 yards [65 meters]/50 grams); #911.0074 - 3 skeins (color A - the blueish one), 911.0001 - 1 skein (color B, the white), & #911.0002 - 1 skein (color C, the tan)

A closer look at the stitch pattern and the handle.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 7, one 16" or 24" circular needle, also in size US 7, one 16" or 24" circular needle in size US 6, and one needle in size US 8 for provisional cast on (optional)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette (20 stitches = 4 inches in pattern)

And now that that's covered, let's make a bag! We'll begin with the handles. I should tell you that you have two options at this point, as well: later on, when you finish the bag, you can either attach the handles by seaming normally, or with a three needle bind off. For both, you'll use your color A yarn. If you'd like to go the seaming route, then, using your size 7 needles, cast on 12 stitches loosely. If you'd like to use the three needle bind off at the end, using your size 8 needle, cast on 12 stitches provisionally, and then transfer work to your size 7 needles (this is also why the size US 8 needle is optional!). 

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Lollipop Beanie

Lollipop Beanie

The story behind this hat is mostly just a story about the yarn; I first spotted this perfect color in my local yarn store back in Madison, and, though I wanted to buy it about 1,000,000 times, I never did. Why? Well, because I have a tendency to psych myself out when trying to design with yarns I really love, and I never quite figured out exactly what I'd do with the skein. Then, of course, I moved to Switzerland, where I can no longer buy Malabrigo at my local yarn store, and I finally had to face the facts. I missed the brand, and wanted this exact skein. So I ordered the fiber online just a few weeks ago, and, this time, I knew exactly what I'd do with it as soon as I touched the stuff. Specifically, I decided to make a hat that looks good enough to eat, aka the Lollipop!

Yarn: Malabrigo Worsted (100% Merino Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #12 Very Berry – one skein

A better look at the cables.
They're lollipop-esque, no?
Needles: one 16" circular needle in size US 8, one 16" circular needle in size US 9, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size 9, and one cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 16 stitches = 4 inches on size US 9 needles in stockinette

So let's make a hat then! Using your size US 8 needles, cast on 80 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the ribbing as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from * 

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 2". Transfer work to your size US 9 circular needle, and then we'll knit one transition row, as follows:

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

It's My Bag, Baby Market Bag

It's My Bag, Baby Market Bag
The name just rolls off the tongue, doesn't it?

First of all, let me apologize for the two-week hiatus: we took a lovely trip to Sardinia (you can find photos on my Instagram account, if you're interested), and three kids in a hotel room is enough to keep your hands full without an extra skein of yarn thrown in the mix! Luckily, while I was vacationing, I was also blocking this sweet little market bag back at home. Made with just about 350 yards of worsted weight yarn and a faux i-cord design, it's sturdy, functional, and attractive. In fact, it's so sturdy that I loaded it up with a bag of apples, seven oranges, three peppers, and my 4 year-old's favorite stuffed toy for the pictures. Long story short, if you'd like to knit a bag that won't lose its shape the first time you use it, this one is for you!

Yarn: Schachenmayr Catania Grande (100% Cotton; 68 yards [63 meters]/50 grams); #3281 Orange - 5 to 6 skeins (I squeaked by with 5, but just barely)

A better look at the handle
attachment.

Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 7, one 16" or 24" circular needle, also in size US 7, one 16" or 24" circular needle in size US 6, one needle in size US 8 for provisional cast on (optional), and one cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches

And with that out of the way, let's make a bag! First, then, we'll start with the handles. And I should tell you that you have two options at this point, as well: later on, when you finish the bag, you can either attach the handles by seaming normally, or with a three needle bind off. If you'd like to go the seaming route, using your size 7 needles, cast on 12 stitches loosely. If you'd like to use the three needle bind off at the end, using your size 8 needle, cast on 12 stitches provisionally, and then transfer work to your size 7 needles (this is also why the size US 8 needle is optional!). 

Anyway, once you're done with your cast on for either method, we'll continue to work the handle as you'll find below. Remember that you can pull the yarn tight before your 4 slipped stitches both in the handle and when you work the bag later; that's your faux i-cord that provides the bag its nice, sturdy shape! So let's work like so:

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Building Bridges Cowl

Building Bridges Cowl
Building Bridges Cowl

My main motivation for designing this cowl was simple: I felt plain, ugly, unadulterated guilt. After all, I've hardly changed direction with the seasons, and spring has definitely sprung. So I finally went to the yarn store and found a fiber a bit more appropriate for warmer weather, and came up with a design to match (speaking of the design, it's based on a bridge here in Zürich. Check out the pic below!). I also thought this design might be a nice candidate for the double-wrap for still-chilly days. Or crazy movie theater air conditioning, or the eventual advent of fall...

Yarn: Lang Yarns Riva (52% Cotton, 48% Acrylic; 115 yards [105 meters]/50 grams); # 0009 Rosa/Grau/Blau - three skeins, & scrap yarn (roughly 36" if you wanna get real precise) for holding provisional cast-on and live stitches on other end during blocking

Building Bridges Cowl
A closer view of the pattern.
It looks like an x!
Needles: One pair of needles in size US 7; one pair of needles in size US 8 for provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

Which brings us to the patterns! Using your size 8 needles, then, cast on 40 stitches provisionally. Transfer stitches to your size 7 needles and we'll move straight to the main pattern, for which you'll need the following notation:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

lt (left twist): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Mauve and Mustard Scarf

Mauve and Mustard Scarf
Mauve and Mustard Scarf
I know, I know. I didn't mention the purple.
It must feel so alone.


In my mind, Mauve and Mustard is a children's story in which our protagonist, a glasses-wearing, pigtail-sporting, 10-year-old pipsqueak named Mauve, learns to love mustard. Or maybe owns Mustard, because he's her potbellied pig. Yes, that's it, and not only are Mauve and Mustard a dynamic duo who thrive on recreating scenes based on the life of the last empress of Russia, but they also love to knit. In fact, Mustard even balls Mauve's yarn, the very yarn with which she makes this double-pointed, three-color, slightly-technical scarf.

Yarn: Lang Yarns Yak (50% Yak Wool, 50% Merino Extrafine; 142 yards [130 meters]/50 grams); #0065 Raspberry - one skein (color A), #0050 Mustard - one skein (color B), & #0066 Plum - one skein (color C)

Mauve and Mustard Scarf
A better look at the pink connect-y part. Well, kinda.
Needles: One pair of needles in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 18 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a scarf! Using your color A yarn, then, cast on 39 stitches loosely, and then we'll move straight to our pattern, as you'll find below. Oh, and if you need any help with your intarsia color changes, you can find a video after the jump! :)

Row 1 (wrong side): using color A, k1, p12; then, switch to color B and p13; then, switch to color C and p12, k1

Row 2: using color C, k1, m1l, k11; then, switch to color B and k6, slip 2 stitches together knitwise-k1-pass 2 slipped stitches over (sl2-k1-p2sso), k6; then, switch to color A and k11, m1r, k1

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Bürkliplatz Cowl

Bürkliplatz Cowl

I've been in Zürich about three weeks now, which has proven to be enough time to both find my favorite grocery store (I love you Central Coop!), and buy and knit up my first Swiss yarn (fine, the yarn is actually Italian. WHAT DO YOU PEOPLE WANT FROM ME??!?!?!). And although I had a myriad of projects to choose from, I went for something that we NEED. Namely, a cowl for my poor freezing husband, since I wouldn't let him move with his last one. It's also my first project that's directly inspired by the city, and the large architectural stones that make up so many of Zürich's buildings. Indeed, that's what the name represents - Bürkliplatz is the tram stop that I got off on to take the picture below, and also near the location at which a nice young woman gave me a puzzled look when she saw me taking a picture of a wall.

Yarn: Sommer Merino 85 (100% Superwash Wool; 93 yards [85 meters]/50 grams); # 131 Charcoal (I made up that color name!) - two skeins

A closer view of the pattern.
Blocked aggressively, the blocks would stretch into
bricks and the architectural inspiration would be more
defined.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 8 (4.5 mm)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches

And now that we've taken care of that, let's make a cowl! First, then, cast on 90 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll move right to the main pattern, which you'll find right after the wall picture that represents the look I was going for with this cowl.

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Sailor's Rib Fingerless Gloves

Sailor's Rib Fingerless Gloves

Did you knit the Sailor's Rib Cowl, but still can't find anything to wear with it? Never fear, these Sailor's Rib Fingerless Gloves will do just the trick! Made with a reinforced palm and plenty of ribbing to keep them snug around the wrists and fingers, these mitts are sturdy, stylish, and warm. They are also suitable for either a man or a woman, with three sizes for your knitting pleasure.

Sizes: small (medium; large) - directions for larger sizes will follow those for the smaller size in parentheses (and, for clarification, the small is for a hand roughly 7" - 7.5" in circumference at the base of the thumb, medium for 7.5" - 8.25", and large for 8.25" - 9")

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #9458 Bainbridge Island Heather - 1 skein

Needles: one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

And with that, let's make some gloves! These mitts are designed as mirror images, so we'll work them one at a time, as follows.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Interrupted Stripe Cowl

Interrupted Stripe Cowl

Sometimes I want to make a fancy-pants project with an intricate stitch pattern and a lot of shaping. And sometimes I just want to make a basic, straightforward cowl while I watch bad television and put up my feet. The Interrupted Stripe Cowl is just such a project, using three colors of worsted weight yarn and nothing more complicated than your basic knit and purl. And the best part is that it still looks (at least a little bit) fancy!

Yarn: Berroco Fuji (38% Silk, 25% Cotton, 22% Rayon, 15% Nylon; 125 yards [115 meters]/50 grams); #9203 Sandy - one skein (color A), #9247 Pacific - one skein (color B), & #9263 Deep Sea - one skein (color C)

A close-up of the stripes. Interrupted.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! Using your color A yarn, then, cast on 110 stitches, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll continue like so: 

Row 1: using color A, knit

Row 2: using color A, purl

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Fun Lance Hat

Fun Lance Hat

Yes, the title of this pattern is a bit tongue-in-cheek. In fact, I named it for my brother-in-law, Lance, who was sad to discover that the Fan Lace Hat was not actually called the Fun Lance Hat, as he initially thought. But since I'm sending him this bad boy for the upcoming winter, I thought it would be a perfect name for this attractive, unisex hat. A word of warning, however - this hat may be less fun to knit than it is to wear if you're not handy with a cable needle, since you'll be cabling every other row. On the flip side, that just gives you an opportunity to learn to cable without a cable needle, if you're ready to pick up a new skill!

Yarn: Malabrigo Rios (100% Merino Superwash; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #43 Plomo - one skein

The finish. It's handsome, no?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 7, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7, and one cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

So let's make a fun (and fancy) Lance hat, shall we? To get started, then, using your size US 5 circular needle, cast on 112 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some ribbing rows as follows:

Ribbing Row: * (p2, k2) three times, p2; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 8 times. Then, switch to your size 7 circular needle, and we'll begin the main pattern, which includes panels of Wave of Honey Stitch from page 272 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. To work it, we'll use the following notation:

front cross (fc): slip 1 stitch to cn and hold in front; k1; k1 from cn

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Tropical Twist Hat

Tropical Twist Hat

First off, I have to say it: I've been having a great time taking my knitting photos in my yard, even if my neighbors now think I'm nuts (and they definitely do). But I don't care, because the Tropical Twist Hat looks great out in the wild. Sure, it's nothing fancy - just some alternating cables - but it's a nice, clean, unisex design that takes variegation well. And sometimes, that's all you need!

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash Paints (100% Hand Painted Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #9859 Tropical Punch - one skein

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6, and one cable needle (cn) or dpn for cabling (or you can always cable without a needle, if you'd prefer)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a hat! First, then, using your circular needle, cast on 120 stitches, place marker, and join in round. If you want to get really fancy, you could knit the first five or six rows in a smaller gauge needle to create a tighter brim, but it's certainly not necessary. Either way you do it, we'll get straight to the main pattern, after a little notation as follows:

front cross (fc): slip 2 stitches to your cn and hold in front; k2; k2 from cn

left twist (lt): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)

And now that we've covered that, let's get to it!

Rows 1 & 2: * p1, k4, p2, k4, p1; rep from *

Row 3: * p1, k4, p2, fc, p1 *

Rows 4 - 8: * p1, k4, p2, k4, p1 *

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Pollyanna Purse

Pollyanna Purse

I've been itching to do another bag ever since I finished the Funner Summer Beach Bag, in large part because I've been bursting with design ideas. And I'm pleased to report that the Pollyanna Purse represents many of them, including faux i-cord edgings in both the strap and the sides and a seamless design. Long story short, it's both sturdy and cute and a reasonably easy knit despite its kinda-fancy design features.

Yarn: Lily Sugar 'n Cream (100% Cotton; 120 yards [109 meters]/70.9 grams); #01215 Robin's Egg - 2 skeins (color A), and #01322 Lilac - 1 skein (color B)

A closer picture of the front middle of the purse.
That's a thing, right? The "front middle"?
Needles: One 24" or longer circular needle in size US 7, one set of straight needles, also in size US 7, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7, as well as size US 9 or 10 needles for provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle, 6 stitch markers

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 7 needles

So let's get started! First, then, let's discuss the structure of this bag - you'll begin by knitting the bottom of the bag & strap (which are connected in a continuous loop). Once that's done, you'll pick up stitches along the edges to create the sides of the bag. So with that in mind, using your larger needle, a provisional cast on, and your color B yarn, cast on 23 stitches loosely. Transfer work to your size 7 straight needles, and then continue as follows:

Row 1 (right side): using color B, knit

Row 2: using color B, k1, slip 3 stitches with yarn in front (wyif), p15, slip 3 wyif, k1

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Honey Cowl

Honey Cowl

I know summer hasn't even technically begun yet, but I figure there are at least a few of you who are already planning for fall. With that in mind, the Honey Cowl is made from a worsted-weight cotton-mix yarn and worked on large needles to give it a little bit more of a relaxed appearance. And while it might be difficult to tell from the pictures, the basketweave pattern that I've chosen for the main design is also a mesh, which gives this design a very unique look. Long story short, this cuddly cowl is perfect for the shoulder seasons, and would work well in most cotton- or acrylic-based worsted weight yarns!

Yarn: Berroco Remix (30% Nylon, 27% Cotton, 24% Acrylic, 10% Silk, 9% Linen; 216 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #3953 Burnt Orange - one skein

A closeup of the basketweave.
Plus some really terrible lighting.
Apologies.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5 (there are a lot of stitches to begin with, so if you don't like knitting on full circulars you might want to start with a 24" or a 20" instead), cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches on size 8 needles

So let's get started! First, then, cast on 119 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then, we'll knit a marker placement/set-up row, as follows:

Marker Placement Row: p16, place marker, p1, k8, p1, place marker, p67, place marker, p1, k8, p1, place marker, purl until end of round

And now, we'll begin incorporating our main pattern, which is Open Basketweave Mesh from page 252 of Barbara G. Walker's Charted Knitting Designs: A Third Treasury of Knitting Patterns, a cable, and some decreases. Oh, and we'll need the following notation:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again. Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

lt (left twist): with right-hand needle behind left-hand needle, skip one stitch and knit the second stitch in back loop; then insert right-hand needle into the backs of both stitches and k2tog-b (knit two together through back loops, inserting right needle from the right)


bc (back cross): slip next 2 stitches to cn and hold in back, k2, k2 from cn

fc (front cross): slip next 2 stitch to cn and hold in front, k2, k2 from cn

And now that that's out of the way, let's proceed as follows:

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Funner Summer Beach Bag

Funner Summer Beach Bag

Yeah, I know "funner" isn't a word. But my kids don't, and that was the inspiration for this brightly striped, cleverly constructed (in my opinion, at least!) bag. Designed seamlessly with faux i-cords for structure and a fun lace pattern, this is one of the sturdier and prettier knit bags you'll find. Knit it, and you'll make your summer more fun. Or, you know, go to the water slides or something like that instead. Your call. :)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Whitney (91% Cotton, 9% Nylon; 87 yards [89 meters]/50 grams); #1001 Natural - three skeins (color A), #1009 Cranberry - two skeins (color B)

The lace pattern. So purty!
Needles: One set of double pointed needles in size US 8, one 16" circular needle in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle, 9 stitch markers

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches 

So let's make a bag! First, then, I should mention that any time you're slipping stitches in this bag, you're pulling the yarn tight behind them. This will help to create that faux i-cord rib, and the edges of the strap. I should also mention that this bag is worked bottom-up. So with that in mind, using your color A yarn and your dpns, cast on 8 stitches loosely, divide evenly between four dpns, and join in round. Then we'll work a few set-up rows, as follows:

Set-up Row 1: using color A, * p1, m1r, p1; rep from * (+4 stitches)

Set-up Row 2: using color A, * p1, slip 1 with yarn in back (wyib), p1 *

Set-up Row 3: using color A, * p1, m1r, k1, m1l, p1 * (+8 stitches)

Once these three set-up rows are done, we'll knit a marker placement row, as follows:

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Butterfly Eyelet Hat

Butterfly Eyelet Hat

As a woman who has had short hair the majority of her life, I rarely find myself needing a very slouchy hat (and thus often design beanies). But sometimes I remember that the rest of you may very well have crazy, messy, big hair that needs a big ol' hat to go on top of it. And that's why I designed the Butterfly Eyelet Hat, which has enough stretch and length to fit over a long, luscious 'do (or just to accent a short one). Anyway, if there's anyone out there who likes the pattern but would prefer a snugger fit to their hat, just hit me up in the comments and we'll see what we can do!

Yarn: Cascade 220 Superwash (100% Superwash Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #1940 Peach – one skein (color A) and #910A Winter White - one skein (color B)

The pattern. Cute little eyelets, eh?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 7, one set of double-pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 7 needles

So let's make a hat! First, then, using your size 5 needle and your color A yarn, cast on 112 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following ribbing row to get started:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k2, p2; rep from *