Showing posts with label dk. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dk. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Float Flutter Fly Scarf

Float Flutter Fly Scarf

I know what you're thinking: Isn't this scarf named for a line in a song in an episode of The Backyardigans? And to that, I say: of course not! What do you think I am, some kind of lunatic? No, I am merely using these three delightfully alliterative words to remark on this scarf's floating ends and fluttering edges, as well as the fact that you'll fly through making this not-too-basic knit and purl design. Any presumed reference to Uniqua, Tasha, Tyrone, and Pablo's quest for a levitating stone is purely circumstantial.

Update as of January 27, 2016: A sharp-eyed commenter brought it to my attention that both my set-up row and my first pattern row were labeled wrong side. Therefore, I've chosen to omit the set-up row from the pattern. If you're halfway through and are lamenting this decision, please don't worry! I highly doubt you will notice the presence or absence of this row when you reach the end of the scarf; you'll be too busy twirling in it to notice. :)

Yarn: Berroco Folio (65% Superfine Alpaca, 35% Rayon; 219 yards [200 meters]/50 grams); #4563 Napa Valley - 2 skeins

A closer look at the knits and the purls.
And a mannequin's armpit.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

And now, it's time to make a scarf! With that in mind, cast on 37 stitches loosely. Then we'll get straight to our pattern, which you'll find below. Note that it's a-okay to pull your yarn tight behind your 5 slipped stitches; this will help form that little ridge in the middle of the scarf.

Row 1 (wrong side): purl

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Lizard People Fingerless Gloves

Lizard People Fingerless Gloves

My husband had just one job with this project: to convince me not to call these mitts the "Lizard People Fingerless Gloves." Obviously, he failed. Luckily, it doesn't matter what I name them, since these fingerless gloves will remain beautifully textured and fun to make either way. So break out your favorite sport weight yarn and get started on a pair of fantastic gloves for all of your lizard friends!

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium up to 8 3/4", and the large goes up to about 9.5")

Yarn: Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8910 Citron - one skein

A closer look at the pattern.
It's lizard-y, no?
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make some mitts! Using your size 5 needles, cast on 40 (44; 48) stitches loosely and then divide among three double-pointed needles as follows: 12 stitches, 16 stitches, 12 stitches (14 stitches, 16 stitches, 14 stitches; 16 stitches, 16 stitches, 16 stitches). Then we'll work a ribbing row as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 6 times (all sizes). Transfer work to your size 6 needles. Then, we'll begin to incorporate a pattern stripe. All sizes can follow the same directions, below:

Row 1: knit

Row 2: knit across first needle, k4, p8, k4, knit across third needle

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Build-Your-Own DK Weight Hat

Build-Your-Own DK Weight Hat

I designed this pattern with one goal in mind; namely, that it could be the first in-the-round project for a beginning knitter who had learned how to knit and purl but not much else. Or in other words, it's supposed to be a tutorial. Of course, you don't have to be a beginning knitter to enjoy it - with a basic design like this, there's all sorts of customization you can add. Throw in stripes or a stitch pattern with a 2-, 4-, or 8-stitch repeat, and you can turn this basic little hat into another beast entirely! Or, add a few inches and omit the knit rows in the decrease and you'll have a gathered crown. And add a few extra inches to THAT and it's slouchy as well!!!!

Oh, and another thing, guys - this is my first tutorial style pattern. So if I seem to be missing an instruction, please let me know! We can make it perfect together. :)

Sizes: 12 Months (Toddler; Child; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult) 

A closer view of the crown.
Yarn: Malabrigo Rastita (100% Merino Wool; 310 yards [285 meters]/100 grams); #850 Archangel - one skein (all sizes)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5; one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles 

Let's make a hat, shall we? First, a note about the sizing. As with virtually any sized knitting pattern, I will give directions in the same order as the sizes appear above. If you're making an adult small, for instance, you'll always use the direction second from the end of the line (or in other words, you'll be casting on 112 stitches here in a moment). My only tip with this direction is that it can be useful to print your pattern and highlight the correct sizes if you're knitting something with a lot of them - otherwise, the numbers can run together. So go ahead and do that if need be. And, once you're done, it's time to get down to business!

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Dot Knot Cowl

Dot Knot Cowl

I've been on a clean design kick lately, so when I saw this understated stitch pattern I just knew I had to try it. From there, it was just a matter of choosing a yarn and an edging to match (the top edging is also rolled down, which adds a fun touch). One word of caution, however; I wouldn't knit this pattern with a darkly-colored yarn, as the stitch pattern would probably get swallowed up in the hue.

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cotton Rich DK (64% Cotton, 36% Nylon; 135.60 yards [124 meters]/50 grams); #2730 - two skeins

A closer look at the dotty little pattern.
Subtle, but nice!

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! To do it, we'll cast on 114 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll get to our edging stitch, which is Close Stitch from page 94 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. And it goes like so:

Edging Row 1: purl

Edging Row 2: * slip 1 with yarn in back (sl1 wyib), k1; rep from *

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Floral Mesh Beanie

Floral Mesh Beanie

I've been posting a lot of user-suggested patterns recently, and the Floral Mesh Beanie is no exception. After completing the Floral Mesh Scarf and Bonnet, I've had requests for a simpler hat as well. And while this stitch pattern doesn't lend itself quite as seamlessly to the round as I would like, that's just because I'm a perfectionist. In practice, you'd never find the seam, although you will have to do a bit stitch-slipping to keep the thing lined up correctly.

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn DK Merino Superwash (100% Superwash Fine Merino Wool; 130 yards [119 meters]/50 grams); #1122 Wisteria - one to two skeins (I got by with one)

The Floral Mesh pattern.
I still love it, guys.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 6 needle

So let's make a hat! Since the lace pattern on this hat has a larger gauge than your ribbing, it's one of the few instances where you'll be casting on more stitches, and then decreasing before you hit the mesh. With that in mind, and using your size 5 16" needle, then, cast on 112 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a ribbing row as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 1.5". Transfer work to your size 6" circular needle, and we'll knit two transition rows, as follows:

Transition Row 1: * k1, p1, k2tog, p1, k1, p1 * (96 stitches)

Transition Row 2: knit

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Jardin Cowl

Jardin Cowl

Okay, I've committed a cardinal knitting sin with this cowl. Namely, I've called for two skeins even though I BARELY needed any of the second one to complete it. However, I just couldn't bear to finish this brightly colored beauty early, so I sucked it up and went for the second hank. On the plus side, that means that those of you using a different yarn for the Jardin Cowl will only need about 200 yards (and could probably squeak by at 175 as well). And if you want to use the same yarn, well, you'll face the same choice I did; quit early with one skein or find another use for what's left over (which, let's face it, you'll almost certainly be seeing sooner or later on this site anyway).

Yarn: Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8910 Citron - two skeins

A better look at the cables.
Pretty little things, aren't they?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! Using your circular needle, cast on 148 stitches loosely. Then we'll knit one marker placement row, as follows:

Marker Placement Row: k62, place marker, (p2, k9) twice, p2, place marker, knit until end of round

And once that little beast is done, we'll move straight to our pattern, which incorporates a strip of Round Link Cables from page 132 of Barbara G. Walker's Charted Knitting Designs: A Third Treasury of Knitting Patterns, as well as some decreases for shaping. So first we'll define our terminology, as follows:

round link cable (rlc): slip 6 stitches to cn and hold in front, k3, then slip the middle 3 stitches (of the 9 total) from cn back to left-hand needle; move cn with final 3 stitches to the back of the work; k3 from left-hand needle, then k3 from cn

And then we'll work like so:

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Three Two One Cowl

Three Two One Cowl

If I haven't dated my stash yet, then this project is sure to do it; as far as I can tell, this yarn was discontinued before my first child was even born (but here's a list of suitable replacements). So here's hoping you have a few skeins of your own oldie-but-goodie buried deep in a drawer that you can use to make this lovely cowl, which uses three colors and two patterns to create one fantastic look!

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cotton Rich DK (64% Cotton, 36% Nylon; 135.60 yards [124 meters]/50 grams); #6313 Berry - one skein (color A), #???? unknown color (but it's the middle one in the cowl, and therefore color B), & #6377 Lavender - one skein (color C)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get to this! First, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 120 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll get immediately to the pattern, which goes as follows:

Rows 1 & 2: * (k2, p2) 3 times, (k1, p1) 6 times; rep from *

Rows 3 & 4: * (k2, p2) twice, k2, (p1, k1) 6 times, p2 *

Rows 5 & 6: * (k2, p2) twice, (k1, p1) 6 times, k2, p2 *

Rows 7 & 8: * k2, p2, k2, (p1, k1) 6 times, p2, k2, p2 *

Rows 9 & 10: * k2, p2, (k1, p1) 6 times, (k2, p2) twice *

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Stripes & Diamonds Scarf

Stripes & Diamonds Scarf

Right now you're probably wondering if I've gone crazy - after all, I went from making zero scarves to making two in, like, a month. But I couldn't help myself; once I realized that I could make a slipped stitch, two-color number with a quick enough color change that I wouldn't have to cut my yarn ends for each stripe, I simply had to do it. The result, of course, is the Stripes & Diamonds Scarf, which employs a basic garter edging and a slipped stitch color pattern in the center for a lovely and very graphic effect that won't leave you cursing a bajillion ends when you're done.

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Ultra Pima (100% Pima Cotton; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #3736 Ice - one skein (color A), #3727 Sky Blue - one skein (color B)

The diamond motif
Needles: Straight needles in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get this scarf party started! First, then, using your color A yarn and your size 5 needles, cast on 31 stitches. Then knit the following set-up row:

Set-up Row: using color A, knit

Knit this set-up row 6 times (yes, this is just six rows of garter stitch). And now that that's done, we'll begin our main pattern, which is a strip of Stripes and Diamonds from page 70 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, as well as some garter stitch. As a side note, the pattern might look long, but it's super easy to remember. So let's proceed as follows:

Row 1 (right side): using color B, k15, slip 1 stitch with yarn in back (wyib), k15

Row 2: using color B, k10, p5, slip 1 wyif, p5, k10

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Floral Mesh Bonnet

Floral Mesh Bonnet

I can proudly state that this is my first-ever matching product; in fact, it goes with last week's design, the Floral Mesh Scarf. And while I haven't ever used the same stitch pattern week-to-week before, I just couldn't resist with this one since, as soon as I saw the scarf completed, I knew it had to have a bonnet. I also sized it for children through adults for a super-fun, multi-seasonal look that will fit most everyone in your family. Why? Well, 'cause they're all going to want one!

Sizes: Child's Small (Child's Large; Teen/Adult Small; Adult Large) (as far as the child's small and the child's large are concerned - think maybe 2 - 5 years for the small, 6 - 12 or so for the large)

Yarn: Schoeller + Stahl Pantino (60% Cotton, 40% Acrylic; 98 yards [90 meters]/50 grams); #0007 Egg Yolk (that color name is still made up) - 2 skeins

A close-up of the pattern.
I left in the creepy eyes because I could.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 5, 16" circular needle in size US 5, and one set of dpns, also in size 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a hat, shall we? First, then, we'll start with the brim of this bonnet, which is knit back and forth. So, using your straight needles, cast on 84 (98; 112; 126) stitches loosely. Then we'll knit a few edging rows, as follows. Notice you'll be placing two stitch markers on your third edging row.

Edging Row 1 (right side): purl

Edging Row 2: knit

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Floral Mesh Scarf

Floral Mesh Scarf

I hope you all are holding onto your butts, because this week's post is a big one! Well, that may be overstating things, but since this purty little number is only my second scarf I feel like it should receive some recognition. And even if it doesn't, I should also mention that it has a fun-to-knit and relatively quick-to-learn lace pattern that pops beautifully, and that its shape features tapered ends so it's a bit more of a challenge than just a rectangle. Basically, this bad little mamma jamma would make a nice addition to your scarf collection, or a lovely gift.

* As of November 25, 2015, I have added a second chart to correspond better with the given row numbers. You can find it right below the first!

You also have two choices for a matching hat: the Floral Mesh Bonnet, or the Floral Mesh Beanie!

Yarn: Schoeller + Stahl Pantino (60% Cotton, 40% Acrylic; 98 yards [90 meters]/50 grams); #0007 Egg Yolk (I made up that color name) - 3 - 4 skeins, depending on finished length

A close up of the pattern
and the decrease end of the scarf
Needles: Straight needles in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 17 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a scarf, people! First, then, I should mention that I actually charted this pattern, so you can find it down at the bottom. Also, since I charted the cast on, the pattern, and the decrease, you could knit almost exclusively from that (except I didn't chart the wrong side rows. The edge of the scarf has two stitches in garter - otherwise, the whole back is purled). Of course, I'll also spell things out. With that in mind, cast on 5 stitches loosely. Then we'll work some set-up rows, as follows:

Set-up Row 1 (wrong side): k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2

Set-up Row 2: k2, m1l, knit until you have 2 stitches left in row, m1r, k2 (+2 stitches)

Knit set-up rows 1 & 2 until you have 13 stitches on your needle and you've just completed row 1 of the pattern. Now we're going to begin working in some of our pattern, which is Floral Mesh from page 218 of Barbara G. Walker's A Fourth Treasury of Knitting Patterns, as follows:

Set-up Row 3 (right side): k2, m1l, k2, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, k2, m1r, k2 (15 stitches)

Set-up Row 4 and all wrong-side rows: k2, purl until you have 2 stitches left in row, k2

Set-up Row 5: k2, m1l, k2, k2tog, yo, k3, yo, ssk, k2, m1r, k2 (17 stitches)

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Cherry Blossom Cowl

Cherry Blossom Cowl

Holy moly. It's been a bit of a stressful morning; not only was the baby unwilling to eat or sleep, but he also spent an hour or two screaming nonstop. Finally, after carrying him around and trying to make him happy all morning, I needed some lunch, so I heated up some pizza. And despite the fact that he had rejected cereal, strawberries, and a squish bag full of baby food, he went DOWNTOWN on the pizza, and now he's happy as a clam. Clearly, he needs to learn how to talk.

And speaking of talking, I should say a word about this piece! First, the name - it's a late spring here in Wisconsin, and the cherry trees are spreading those delightful, pale pink blossoms that I love so much. The color of this cowl and the bobbles reminded me of them. And yes, you're right - it is my first time knitting bobbles! Turns out it's not so hard. So if you haven't done it before, this lovely, lightweight piece is a great place to start!

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Sateen (100% Acrylic; 300.7 yards [275 meters]/100 grams); #7 Ballerina Pink - one skein

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

Anyway, let's get started! First, then, we'll cast on 152 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. As a note, this piece will be fitting pretty close to the head (my finished piece is about 20" in circumference, unstretched). And while I have no trouble getting it over my 22" noggin, you may want to cast on a few extra stitches if you have a larger head. Just let me know if you need help modifying the pattern! Anyway, let's continue. It's time to knit the following set-up row, to get started:

Set-up Row: p21, place marker, p110, place marker, purl until end of round

And once this bad boy is out of the way, it's time to begin on our main pattern, which incorporates a large section of Field of Wheat from page 278 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns and some decreases, since I am obsessed with a nicely-shaped cowl. Anyway, to continue, you'll need the following notation:

mb (make bobble): (k1, yo, k1, yo, k1) in one stitch, which will turn one stitch into five; turn and k5; turn and p5; turn and k1, slip 1-k2tog-psso, k1; turn and p3tog, which completes bobble. When you reach this stitch again on the following row, knit through the back loop of the bobble stitch rather than the front loop. 

And now that that's out of the way, let's get knitting!

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Pretty in Pink Cowl

Pretty in Pink Cowl

I've been staring at this page for a while now, trying to figure out what to say about this pattern. The problem, of course, is that I can only think of one thing - namely, that I'm super pleased by how well this little turkey turned out. It's light, it's springy, it drapes beautifully, and my baby CANNOT STOP GRABBING IT whenever I put it on (what can I say? The kid's got taste). It's also a very versatile piece, and looks good with anything from a flannel to a tank top and jeans. Just make sure to make it in a neutral-ish color, 'cause you're going to want to wear it every dang day.

Sizes: Small (Large) - fyi, the only difference in these two patterns will be the number of stitches in your cast on and the marker placement row. Also, the only reason I'm offering two sizes is based on head size - you're going to want this thing to fit snug up against your neck, and you're going to want the small if you have a smaller head, the large if you have a larger head.

Yarn: Berroco Folio (65% Superfine Alpaca, 35% Rayon; 219 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #4524 Bailey - 1 skein

A closer pic of the lace
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, five stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's do this! First, cast on 142 (152) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following marker placement row:

Marker Placement Row: k35 (k40), place marker, k19, place marker, k34, place marker, k19, place marker, knit until end of round

And once that's done, begin to incorporate Miniature Leaf Pattern from page 215 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, which goes like so:

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Butterfly Stitch Cowl

Butterfly Stitch Cowl

Okay, I'll own it: a linen blend yarn isn't particularly winter-y, and I should probably stick to super cold-weather yarns now that the temperature has dropped. Luckily for me, though, this pattern makes such a robust and supple fabric that the yarn's fiber mix hardly seems to matter. And it's not just the Butterfly Stitch Cowl's yarn that's versatile, either, it's also the sizing. In fact, I've provided a version for everyone 2 and older. Hello mommy-daughter matching time!

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Adult)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Linen Concerto (48% Rayon, 42% Linen, 10% Cotton; 101 yards [92 meters]/50 grams); #01 Cream - 2 skeins (2 - 3 skeins, depending on length; 3 skeins)

A better look at the pattern
Needles: 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! First, cast on 100 (110; 120) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit five set-up rows, as follows:

Set-up Rows 1 - 4: purl

Set-up Row 5: knit

And now let's move on to the main pattern, which is Butterfly Stitch from page 101 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. Before we get to that, however, let's define our butterfly stitch as follows:

bs (butterfly stitch) (yes this abbreviation makes me happy): slip 1 stitch purlwise (this stitch should be the middle stitch above your five slipped bars), then insert right-hand needle down behind 5 bars and pull them up, then insert left-hand needle up behind the 5 bars (which will orient them knitwise). Finally, slip middle stitch back to left-hand needle and knit all 5 bars and middle stitch together

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Super Slouch Hat

Super Slouch Hat

Some of you asked, and now I'm delivering! The Super Slouch Hat is not just an airy puff of head-topping goodness, it's also knit entirely (wait for it... wait for it...) BACK AND FORTH! So yes, that means that this is the perfect hat for the dpn-adverse among you. It also doesn't have to be nearly as slouchy as it's shown in the picture - with one less pattern repeat and a smaller needle, this would make a more fitted but equally delectable hat. And hey, if you do it that way - take pictures, I'd love to see it!

Yarn: Berroco Folio (65% Superfine Alpaca, 35% Rayon; 219 yards [200 meters]/50 grams); #4502 Orr - 1 skein

The finish.
Needles: Size US 4 needles, size US 7 needles (or US 5 or US 6 for a less relaxed fit)

Notions: Tapestry needle, 8 stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 5 needles

So let's get started! First, then, using your size 4 needles, cast on 114 stitches loosely (if you want to be extra clever, leave a tail long enough for seaming later). Then we'll knit the following ribbing rows, to create the bottom edge of the hat:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): p2, * k2, p2; rep from *

Ribbing Row 2: k2, * p2, k2 *

Knit ribbing rows 1 & 2 until piece measures roughly 1 1/4" and you've just finished row 1 of the pattern. Now it's time to switch to our size 7 needles (size 5 or 6 needles if you'd like a more fitted hat) and knit one set-up row to place our extra markers, which goes as follows:

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Horseshoe Cable Muffler

Horseshoe Cable Muffler

Where do I start with this one? How about at the very beginning, back when my sister and I were wee little girls and loved to play nothing more than "Old Days," where we dressed up in Little House on the Prairie-worthy thrift store clothes and pretended to be princesses-turned-scullery-maids, or occasionally scullery-maids-turned-princesses. And how is this relevant? Well, because the Horseshoe Cable Muffler is exactly the type of piece that we would have relished back then, with its rustic color and snuggly, old-timey aesthetic. Of course, this cowl/scarf isn't just relegated to the past, as you can dress it up three different ways for a very modern look. As a note, however, if you're planning to use it mainly as a scarf, you will need extra yardage of your yarn and you'll want to continue the piece longer than I made it for the best effect.

The end of the muffler.
Yarn: Skacel Alpaca Seta (75% Baby Alpaca, 18% Silk, 7% Nylon; 137 yards [125 meters]/50 grams); #11 Lemon Grass Twist - 2 skeins

Needles: One set of straight needles in size US 6, two double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6, and a size US 8 or larger needle for your provisional cast on

Notions: Tapestry needle, cable needle (cn), stitch holder


Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started!


Using a provisional cast on and your larger needles, cast on 38 stitches. Then switch to your size 6 needles and we'll move straight to our pattern. You'll need the following terminology to continue:

cable front (cf): transfer next 2 stitches to cn and hold in front, k2, k2 from cn

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Vertical Drop-Stitch Scarf

Vertical Drop-Stitch Scarf
As a much younger woman, I was obsessed with scarves. I made them, I bought them, and I received them as thoughtful gifts. Then I had kids, and all of my beautiful scarves became glorified teething rings and/or nooses (and I discovered the cowl). Nevertheless, when I found this yarn, I knew it was time to design my first-ever scarf, this Vertical Drop-Stitch number. As an added bonus, it even has an I-cord edging, so it's as polished as it is pretty.

Yarn: Berroco Weekend DK (75% Acrylic, 25% Peruvian Cotton; 268 yards [247 meters]/100 grams); #2924 Rhubarb - one skein

The end detail
Needles: Size 6 straight needles

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

Okie-dokie-o, let's get started! As I've mentioned, we will be working this scarf with I-cord edgings, and as you can probably tell from the pictures, we will be tapering the ends for the prettiness factor. So, before we get to the main pattern, we will cast on 8 stitches and then work the following set-up rows. Your I-cord edgings will consist of 3 stitches on either edge of the piece, and if you want a tutorial about the process, please go here. Basically, we will be slipping these stitches on the right sides and purling them on the wrongs; that's really all you need to do to create what looks like an I-cord. Anyway, did you get those 8 stitches cast on? Good, then let's continue like so:

Set-up Row 1 (wrong side): p3, k2, p3

Set-up Row 2: slip 3 wyib (with yarn in back), m1r, p2, m1l, slip 3 wyib

Set-up Row 3: p4, k2, p4

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Colorblocked V Cowl

Colorblocked V Cowl

Guess what, dudes?!?! Today marks the publication of my 100th pattern (this one, of course), and to celebrate, I'm posting something I love so much that I'm even going to keep it. And not only is the Colorblocked V Cowl next-level cute, but it's also an excellent choice for your leftover yarns (in fact, I made it with the yarn remaining after I knit the Arrowhead Lace Cowl II and the Striped for Spring Cowl). So let's get right to it!

Update (10/23/14): As of today, you can also find back-and-forth instructions for this piece following the regular instructions (so that means no circular knitting at the top)!

Yarn: Schachenmayr smc Cotton Bamboo (75% Cotton, 50% Bamboo; 131 yards [120 meters]/50 grams); #64 Aqua - one skein (color A), Cascade Yarns Ultra Pima (100% Pima Cotton; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #3777 African Violet - 1 skein (color B); #3705 Heathered Pansy - 1 skein (Color C)

Here you can see the detail a few slipped
stitches adds
Needles: One 16" or 20" circular needle in size 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! Using your color A yarn, cast on 112 stitches, place marker, and join in round (please note that this cowl, when finished, will be just over 20 inches in circumference. This should accommodate most head sizes, since knit stuff stretches and all, but if you want instructions for a slightly larger piece, just hit me up. It's still ballstothewallsknits@gmail.com). Anyway, then you'll knit the following row to place your extra stitch markers:

Stitch Marker Placement Row: k1, (p1, k1) 27 times, place marker, p2, place marker, k1, * p1, k1; rep from * to end of round

And now, we'll move on to a seed stitch for the top band of this cowl, like so:

Row 1: p1, * k1, p1 * to first marker, slip marker, p2, slip marker, p1, * k1, p1 * to end of round

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Eiffel Tower Eyelet Cowl

Eiffel Tower Eyelet Cowl

So, there's not too much I need to explain about this cowl, except that it accomplishes the impossible; it makes me love both a purl-background fabric and the freakin' garter stitch, which I typically avoid like the plague (and yes, it's completely irrational how much I dislike garter stitch. I apologize to those of you who love it). It's also a simple enough design to look good with a variegated yarn, although I imagine it would pop even more with a single-color fiber. Anyway, let's cut the chitchat and head to the pattern instead!

A detail shot. See the tiny towers???
Yarn: Berroco Boboli Lace (42% Wool, 35% Acrylic, 23% Viscose; 350 yards [320 meters]/100 grams); #4366 Fondant - one skein

Needles: 24" circular needle in size 6, 20" circular needle in size 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! First, then, using your 24" needle, cast on 192 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. And now, we'll work the bottom border, which is Swiss Ribbing from page 340 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. Or in knitting terms, let's begin like so:

Rows 1 - 4: * k3, p3; rep from *

Rows 5 & 6: * k1, slip 1 with yarn in back (wyib), k1, p3 *

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Fretted Band Cowl

Fretted Band Cowl

The explanation for this cowl is simple: I love these two yarns together, even if my husband originally thought the combination was strange. And while this piece turned out more like the Sweet Strawberry Cowl and the Sugar & Ice Cowl than I originally intended, it has enough differences to set it apart. Like the slip stitch pattern, for instance, which would also look good in more contrasting yarns.

Yarn: SMC Select Reflect (52% Viscose, 48% Cotton; 131 yards [120 meters]/50 grams); #4108 - one skein (color A), SMC Select Violena Colori (50% Cotton, 50% Modal; 109 yards [100 meters]/50 grams); color #4307 (color B)

The slip stitch pattern, closer up.
Needles: One 20" circular needle in size 6, two double pointed needles (dpns), also in size 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 21 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get this thing started! To begin, use your color A yarn to cast on 144 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit a couple of edging rows, as follows:

Edging row: using color A, * k2, p2, k2; rep from *

Knit the edging row three times, and then we'll transition to our slip stitch pattern, which is a variation on Fretted Band Pattern from page 67 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. We'll be slipping all stitches with the yarn in the back. And we'll proceed like so:

Rows 1 & 2: using color B, knit

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Pretty Plum Cowl

Pretty Plum Cowl

I won't deny it - the entire motivation for this cowl was finding a nice way to knit up this beautiful, nicely-textured yarn. And I think that this particular combination of cables, stockinette, and an openwork lace suits the yarn's variegation well, and gives the piece a bit of visual interest without getting totally swallowed by the color changes. It's also a nice weight for spring!

A closer look at the cable-edged stockinette and lace pattern.
Yarn: Schachenmayr smc Cotton Bamboo Batik (50% Cotton, 50% Viscose (Bamboo); 131 yards [120 meters]/50 grams); #95 Plum Mix - two skeins

Needles: One 24" circular needle in size 6, cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, seven stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

And now that that's out of the way, let's get started! First, then, cast on 136 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then, knit the following set-up rows, during which you'll be placing all of your extra markers. Oh, and you'll need the following notation:

bc (back cross): slip 2 stitches to cn and hold in back, k2, k2 from cn