Showing posts with label chunky. Show all posts
Showing posts with label chunky. Show all posts

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Ramble On Beanie

Ramble On Beanie
Ramble On Beanie
Pictured in size Adult Medium

Recently, I had the tremendous good fortune of attending the Loch Ness Knit Fest, where I both drank some truly horrendous coffee AND bought this truly spectacular yarn (you can imagine which one was more exciting...). And, like so many beautiful yarns, I determined that this skein needed a pretty but basic pattern that would show off its gorgeous variegation without too much extra fuss. Therefore I came up with the Ramble On Beanie, an excellent, unisex design that you can whip up in an afternoon!

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Teen/Adult Small; Adult Medium; Adult Large)

Yarn: Cookston Crafts Chunky Baby Alpaca (100% Baby Alpaca; 109 yards [100 meters]/100 grams); Multicolored Pastels (that's what I'm calling it since the color is unnamed!) - one skein (one skein; one skein; one - two skeins; two skeins)

Ramble On Beanie
Another look at the finish
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10.5

Notions: tapestry needle, one stitch marker

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches on size US 11 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 10.5 circular needle, then, cast on 52 (56; 60; 64; 68) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a ribbing as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures roughly 2" (2.5"; 3"; 3"; 4"). Then we'll move right to the main pattern, which is a variation of Rambler Pattern from page 122 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. And it goes like so. Notice that the pattern diverges into two groups for the rest of the instructions; make sure you're following the correct instructions for your size!

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Nikki's Slouch Hat

Nikki's Slouch Hat
Nikki's Slouch Hat
pictured in size Adult Small/Medium

Here's another pretty hat with a simple story: my friend Nikki was struggling to find a nice slouch hat here in Switzerland. Meanwhile, I had just bought some lovely yarns at my local store knowing that they would be *perfect* for something. And what do you know, a few conversations and copious swatching later, Nikki's Slouch Hat was born! With a combination of cabled panels (for squish) and simple striping (for ease), this hat has texture and charm galore!!!

Sizes: Adult Small/Medium (Adult Medium/Large)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Landlust Merino 120 (100% Virgin Wool; 131 yards [120 meters]/50 grams); #105 Taupe - one skein (two skeins) (color A), & #116 Petrol - one skein (both sizes) (color B) (side note: I didn't have a full 10% of my color A skein left over when I finished this hat, so I suppose it's possible that you'll need two skeins to finish the small size too. If you get in that situation, however, I suggest you fudge it and finish with color B, especially if you're gonna add a pompom!)

Nikki's Slouch Hat
A look at the back.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one 16" circular needle in size US 11, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 11, and one cable needle (cn) or extra dpn for cabling (or cable without a cable needle, if you like!)

Notions: tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size US 4 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 10.5 needle and your color A yarn, then, cast on 76 stitches (80 stitches) loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work in a basic ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until ribbing measures roughly 2" (2.5"-3"), and then transfer work to your size US 11 circular needle. Then, we'll work the following transition row. Notice the row is different for the two different sizes.

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Nightmare Yarn Hat

Nightmare Yarn Hat
Nightmare Yarn Hat
Pictured in Adult Large

Okay, first and foremost, let's get this straight: I'm not actually saying that this yarn (Lana Grossa Colorato Nodo) is a nightmare - I mean, heck, I picked it out, and was pretty darn excited when I saw it! However, as you can clearly see in every picture, this yarn has one peculiarity that makes it difficult to work with - the significant size changes of the fiber, which make roughly 1/10 of the stitches look like they gorged on cured ham until they become monstrously swollen. And because this is not a peculiarity that I noticed until I got the yarn home, my original plan for this yarn was a total disaster - this stuff doesn't take ribbing (who knew ribbing could look terrible!?!?), and looks even worse as a rolled brim (unless you want to look like an incompetent knitter). So, basically, I had to punt. Therefore, I went with the most fool-proof design I could think of, and one that you, too, can put to work for that almost-novelty yarn you accidentally bought and then realized swallows every pattern you put near it (or that you bought on purpose! hi there! no shame, we'll start a club!). (Of course, this pattern is perfectly good for non-nightmarish yarns too!)

Oh, and a quick word on sizing - usually, of course, when you're sizing your hat the biggest concern is head size. That doesn't work quite as well with the nightmare yarn conundrum. And in fact, if you're working with a fiber that isn't predominately wool, you may want to veer in the adult small direction just to accommodate the inevitable stretching.

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Lana Grossa Colorato Nodo (90% Virgin Wool, 10% Polyamide; 120 yards [110 meters]/50 grams); #109 - two skeins 

Nightmare Yarn Hat
A better look at the finish,
the cable, and those pesky big
stitches.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles, also in size US 10, one cable needle (cn) or dpn for cabling, and one needle in size US 11 for provisional cast-on

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker, scrap yarn for provisional cast-on

Gauge: 15 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a cute hat from some difficult yarn! Using your size US 11 needle, cast on 18 stitches provisionally. Then, transfer the stitches to either one of your dpns or your size US 10 circular (you can use either since we're starting by knitting flat). Then we'll work the cabled bottom edge of the hat as you'll find below. To do this, you'll need the following notation. And remember you can always cable without a cable needle!

back cross (bc): transfer next 2 stitches to your cn and hold in back; k2, k2 from cn

front cross (fc): transfer next 2 stitches to your cn and hold in front; k2, k2 from cn

Friday, December 9, 2016

Bump Up From Basics Beanie

Bump Up From Basics Beanie
Pictured in Child Size

Okay, I'm doing something a little bit different with this pattern, since I'm not offering it on my website, but through a video tutorial I created on Skillshare instead. Which means that, yes, I've had to face my fear of being on camera (don't worry, I deleted all the takes where I opened my eyes super-wide for no reason), and that this pattern is not technically "free" since it requires a membership on the website to access it. If you sign up through the link above, however, you can get 3 months on the website for $0.99, and access to tons of video content from all sorts of talented and amazing people (and I get some compensation as well!).

Oh, and as far as the actual pattern is concerned - I designed the Bump Up From Basics Beanie as a sort of next-level project for beginning knitters who've gotten comfortable with knitting and purling and are ready to move on to something more complicated. Or in other words, I demonstrate every technique you need to make this hat in the video except for knitting, purling, and tucking in your ends! :)

Anyway, here are the details:

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Susan's Scarf

Susan's Scarf
Susan's Scarf

I doubt many of you realize this, but what this scarf represents is actually a tiny miracle; namely, it's the second piece of a hat/scarf set that I designed to go together for the first time, EVER!!! (if you're interested, you can find Susan's Slouch Hat here) But of course you don't have to be interested in the set to enjoy this pattern, partially because, while I made it with only 2 skeins of yarn (roughly 250 yards), as long as you cast on an odd number of stitches and have a rough idea of your gauge, you can make it any size you like! That also means that this pattern is easy to adapt for different gauges of yarn - and please, feel free to hit me up in the comments if you need any extra help!!!

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Pure Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #063 Natural - two to three skeins 

Susan's Scarf
A closer look.
Needles: One 40" or longer circular needle in size US 10, one 40" or longer circular needle in size US 10.5, one 5 or 6 mm crochet hook, 2 lengths of scrap yarn measuring roughly 6' apiece

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 10.5 needles

So let's make a scarf, then! Using your size US 10 circular needle, cast on 189 stitches loosely. Then, we'll work some ribbing, as follows, for the edge of the scarf:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): slip 1 stitch with yarn in front (sl1 wyif), * k1, p1; rep from * until end of round

Ribbing Row 2: sl1 with yarn in back (sl1 wyib), * k1, p1 *

Work ribbing until piece measures between roughly 2.25" and 2.5" and you've just finished a wrong side row (of course this part of the pattern is also adaptable - if you have the yarn and want to make it wider, go to town!). Then, we'll add a bunch of stitches that we'll later use to work the band that runs between the ribbing and the stockinette. Once we add them, we'll simply hold them all on a piece of scrap yarn on the right side of the scarf. So, to that end, work these two transition rows:

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Susan's Slouch Hat

Susan's Slouch Hat
(even though Hedwig is wearing it)

As you can probably guess from the name in the title, this hat was designed with a specific person in mind. And in fact, I've been meaning to knit this person something for some time, but it wasn't until autumn descended and I saw her seasonal red jacket that I realized EXACTLY what she needed (to be fair, she also told me she wanted something in the white/natural color family and tried to get knitting tips before I stole the project right out from under her and told her I'd come up with something instead). What was I saying? Oh right, Susan's Slouch Hat will be your go-to head covering since it knits up quickly in chunky weight yarn and has a simple but elegant design. (Oh, and let's keep our fingers crossed that it becomes Susan's go-to head covering as well, or the whole thing is a monumental failure!)

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Pure Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #063 Natural - one skein

A close-up of the detail that takes this hat from
blah to boo-yah (yeah, nobody says that)!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 8, one 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one 5 or 6 mm crochet hook, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 10.5, scrap yarn measuring roughly 24"

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 10.5 needles

So let's make a hat! Using your size US 8 circular needle, then, cast on 72 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then, we'll work some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1; rep from * until end of round

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Ruched Mitts

Ruched Mitts
Ruched Mitts

I'm not exactly sure where to start with these guys, mostly because I don't actually want to start. After all, if I begin this post, I'm going to have to explain that my recent absence was due to repetitive stress issues with my forearms, that I'm doing much better now, thank you very much, and that I will probably be relaxing my regular posting schedule so that I can continue to do well.

And heck, since I don't want to go through all that, let's not - let's talk about these mitts instead! And the first thing I should mention in that realm is that I bought this yarn because I thought it would make an easy project - it's bulky weight, for goodness sake, and not even variegated! Unfortunately, I was wrong since it turns out that this particular fiber is one of those strong core/big halo types (you know what I mean, right? - there's a thick center and then lots of fuzz?). And those types of yarn are very pattern resistant, since lace knitting isn't well-defined in them and even cables look messy. Which is how I finally stumbled across the ruched design, which uses some well-placed eyelets and a scrap yarn i-cord to create some interest. So let's get started!

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7.5" - 8.5" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium up to 9.5", and the large goes up to about 10.5")

Yarn: Schachenmayr Fashion Nordic Dream (57% Viscose, 35% Wool, 8% Polyamide; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #00002 Natur Mélange - one skein (color A) & Malabrigo Worsted (100% Merino Wool; 210 yards [192 meters]/100 grams); #12 Very Berry – roughly 20 yards (color B)

Ruched Mitts
A better look at the ruching.
My five-year-old likes it.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 8

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 16 stitches = 4 inches

Which brings us to the mitts! To begin, then, using your color A yarn, cast on 28 (32; 36) stitches loosely and distribute between 3 dpns as follows: 8 stitches on first needle, 12 stitches second needle, 8 stitches on third needle [(10; 12; 10); (12; 12; 12)]. Join in round. Then we'll move straight to our main pattern, as follows:

Rows 1 - 6: knit

Row 7: knit across first needle; k2, [k2tog, (yo) twice, ssk] twice, k2 from second needle; knit across third

Row 8: knit, working a (k1, p1) into each double yo 

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

She's A Betty Bonnet

She's A Betty Bonnet
She's A Betty Bonnet
Isn't she, though?

When's the last time I mentioned how much I love Malabrigo yarn? Let's be honest: I probably bored my kids with that knowledge earlier this morning. However, just because I'm a broken record doesn't mean that you can't make this super-sweet bonnet for yourself or a loved one (and I'll even let you use a chunky weight fiber that isn't Malabrigo if you really insist). My only note is that, while I finished this bad boy with just one skein of the Mecha, or 130 yards, it was a close call so you may need slightly more yarn to complete yours. But don't worry - this fancifully-finished design (check out the back below!) will be worth it either way.

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #809 Solis - 1 - 2 skeins

She's A Betty Bonnet
A closer view of the back finish.
It's different, no?
Needles: Straight needles in size US 10.5, one 16" circular needle in size US 11 needle, and one set of double pointed needles in size US 11

Notions: Tapestry needle, 5 stitch markers

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 11 needles

So let's make a hat, then! First, then, since we'll begin by knitting flat, go ahead and use your size 10.5 needles to cast on 80 stitches loosely. Then we'll knit some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row 1 (wrong side): * p1, k2, p1; rep from *

Ribbing Row 2: * k1, p2, k1 *

Knit ribbing rows 1 & 2 until piece measures roughly 1.5" and you've just finished row 2 of the pattern. Transfer work to your size US 11 needle (yes, it's circular, but we're still working flat!). Then we'll work one marker placement row, as follows:

Marker Placement Row (wrong side): p8, place marker, p24, place marker, p16, place marker, p24, place marker, p8

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

I'm Lichen This Hat

I'm Lichen This Hat
No, really. I'm really, really, REALLY lichen it.

If recent years have taught me anything, it's that I am one of about six Americans who would rather eat rocks than watch a televised singing competition. Of course, I do have one odd exception to my music-free reality television preferences, the always-delightful The Sing-Off (I'm also lying when I say it's always delightful - 2014's weird Christmas special was no good. I miss Sara Bareilles). What's my point here? OH YEAH, PUNS! I think I like the show because of the constant and terrible puns that are constantly coming forth from host Nick Lachey's mouth. And, based on the name I came up with for this pattern, I also think the nice folks on TV's best a cappella singing competition program might tap me as a writer if the show ever gets another season.

Speaking of this hat, I got the design idea from a strange, ruched-looking entrance way I pass by every day on my way to my kids' schools, but you're just going to have to take my word for it because I've been too lazy to take a picture. I did get a lovely shot of some similarly-colored lichen, though, which made for a better pattern name anyway. You can find that below!

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #031 Mostaza - one skein

A better view of the back, cute little
braid and all!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10, one 16" circular needle in size US 11 needle, one set of double pointed needles in size US 11, and a cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, 4 stitch markers

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 11 needles

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 10 circular needle, then, cast on 66 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a few edging rows, for which you'll need the following terminology. Remember you can always skip your cable needle, if you'd like.

back cross (bc): slip 2 stitches to cn and hold in back; k2, k2 from cn

front cross (fc): slip 2 stitches to cn and hold in front; k2, k2 from cn

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Vaduz Cowl

Vaduz Cowl

First, let me acknowledge the last few pattern-less weeks. It turns out that moving internationally with three children is just as hard as they say it is, especially when you also decide to assemble all of your new furniture by hand as soon as you arrive (thanks, IKEA!). Long story short, I've barely had time to comb my hair, much less knit. But I will say that my new city of Zürich, Switzerland is just as inspiring as I hoped it would be, and I plan to launch a pattern collection with this place in mind. 

Until then, I hope you enjoy a design I made before our move, the Vaduz Cowl. And why'd I call it that? Well, Vaduz is the capital of Switzerland's neighboring Liechtenstein. And since I gave this cowl to my sister, who then helped me with my family's move, and then took a day trip on the train, the cowl made it to the world's sixth-smallest country before I could. With that in mind, may it accompany on your (or your sister's) next adventure as well!!!

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Merino Superwash Wool; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #031 Mostaza - one skein

The cable.
Needles: One pair of size US 11 needles, cable needle (cn) or double pointed needle for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a cowl! First things first, then cast on 32 stitches loosely (you can also use a provisional cast on, if you prefer a seamless look). Then we'll move straight to our main pattern, which combines Staghorn Cable from page 251 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns with some basic knits and purls. So first, we'll define our cables like so:

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Banded Cable Beanie

Banded Cable Beanie

Sometimes a good hat needs no introduction. Or at least that's what I'm telling myself today because, quite frankly, I don't feel like writing one. Nevertheless, I will tell you that this hat works up quickly and reasonably easily for a cabled number and is suitable for the larger-headed amongst us (as well as the smaller-headed, although it won't be overly snug). It's also pretty snappy looking, if I do say so myself.

Yarn: Berroco Vintage Chunky (52% Acrylic, 40% Wool, 8% Nylon; 136 yards [125 meters]/100 grams); #6146 Azure - one skein

A better look at the decrease.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles (dpn), also in size US 10, and a cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat! Using your size 9 needle, then, cast on 75 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work our ribbing as follows:

Ribbing Row: * (k1, p1) twice, k1; rep from *

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Little Tent Hat

Little Tent Hat

I'm paying the piper with this pattern - and, by "the piper," I mean my eldest son, who has learned that he only needs to bat his sweet little eyes at the yarn store to get almost any fiber he wants (I draw the line at novelty). So, he picked the yarn, and then we picked the pattern together; something whimsical and fun, but that would suit both children and adults. Speaking of which, I've designed this hat in four sizes, which should cover everyone from about 18 months to adult (because - scarily enough - there really isn't that much of a difference in head size). If you need any additional guidance choosing a size, just let me know in the comments! :)

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 128 Superwash (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 128 yards [117 meters]/100 grams); #1952 Blaze - one skein plus a little scrap white for the pompom (oh, and if you're making the adult large hat, you may need 2 skeins to complete the pompom)

A closer view of the little tents
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

And now that we know what we're working with, let's get started! Using your size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 60 (66; 72; 78) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some ribbing to get started, as follows:

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Austrian Block Hat

Austrian Block Hat
Size Adult Small

I wish I had a super-good story for this hat, but I don't. Basically, I had the yarn (left over from the Little Red Hooded Cowl), I saw the stitch pattern, and the hat-baby I imagined would result from the combination of the two seemed neat. And, whaddya know, it IS neat, and makes a quick, unisex knit perfect for your last-minute holiday gifting needs (not that we're there yet!).

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky (75% Acrylic, 22% Wool, 3% Rayon; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #999  - one skein 

A closer look at the pattern.
So blocky!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

And now it's time to make a hat! Using your size 9 needle, then, cast on 70 (80) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a ribbing row, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p2, k2, p1, k2, p2; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 8 times (10 times) and transfer your work to your size 10 needle. Now it's time to begin the main pattern, which is a Austrian Block Pattern from page 146 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. To do it, we'll need some terminology, as follows:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Slipping into Winter Cowl

Slipping into Winter Cowl

It's been a while since I mentioned it, but it's still true: my four-year-old is still obsessed with pink. Therefore, any time I take him to the craft store, I leave with at least one skein of rose-colored yarn. And when he chose this fiber, I decided to pair the pink with a nice blue-green for a double-wrapping, super snuggly cowl. The graphic color pattern and thick yarn make this a fun, reasonably quick knit that's unapologetically snuggle-tastic.

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky (75% Acrylic, 25% Wool; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #029 Pastel Pink - one skein (color A), & #0670 Teal Heather - one skein (color B)
A closer version of the pattern.
As you can see, my slipped stitches
face opposite directions in the different
colors. Grafting, baby.

Needles: One 32" circular needle in size US 10, one 32" or longer circular needle in similar needle size (to hold one half of work for grafting) (also, you don't need this needle if you're going to knit straight through instead of grafting)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! Of course, before we get started, I should mention one thing. Namely, that I made this cowl in two halves and then grafted them together because I wanted the long slipped stitches in contrasting colors to face each other, rather than continue in the same direction (as you can see in the picture above). If you'd rather not graft a whole heck of a lot of stitches together and/or if you prefer to have all of your long slipped stitches oriented in the same direction, I'll give alternate directions for that option below. 

However, no matter which way you're making this thing, you will begin like so: using your 32" circular needle in size US 10 and your color A yarn, cast on 138 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit a few edging rows, like so:

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Rickrack Braid Hat

Rickrack Braid Hat

The first thing I should mention (before I forget to) is that I designed this hat to match the 81-Yard Cowl. However, I didn't want to go too matchy-matchy, so the hat uses a stripe of stockinette that's two stitches wide rather than the cowl's single stitch. Nevertheless, if made in the same yarn these two items would make for a handsome pair. And an economical one, since this hat uses almost the same yardage as the cowl!!!

Yarn: Schachenmayr smc Boston (70% Acrylic, 30% Virgin Wool; 60 yards [55 meters]/50 grams); #72 Pine - two skeins (I know I just said this hat uses the same yardage as the cowl - that's 'cause I didn't use all of my two skeins!!)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one set of double pointed needles, also in size US 10.5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 64 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row 1: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Little Red Hooded Cowl

Little Red Hooded Cowl
Size 4 - 6, on a giant-headed 4-year-old

So here's the thing. I made the Baby Bear Hooded Cowl for my six-year-old, and then my four-year-old demanded a similar hat of his own. And while many elements of the two designs are the same (I made them with the same weight yarn and same basic premise), the Little Red Hooded Cowl adds a cute little cable, just for fun. That same cable also makes it fit a tad snugger than the Baby Bear Hooded Cowl, which also gives it a slightly different look.

Note: As of 1/14/17, I've corrected the cast on number for the large adult. :)

Sizes: Toddler (Ages 4 - 6; Ages 7 - 12; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky (75% Acrylic, 22% Wool, 3% Rayon; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #999  - one skein (two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two skeins)

A closer look at the cable.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

So let's get started! Using your 16" size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 64 (68; 72; 76; 80) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: p3, k6, p2, * k2, p2; rep from * until you have 13 stitches left in round, then k2, p2, k6, p3

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

81-Yard Cowl

81-Yard Cowl

If you're looking for a true one-skein knitting pattern, then you've come to the right place; the 81-Yard Cowl is designed to use, quite literally, one and only one skein of yarn. And the inspiration behind the pattern was the yarn itself - although I bought it a few years ago, I've never been able to find the exact right use for it until I just decided to make something, already! So for all of you out there with one odd skein and no purpose in sight, I encourage you to make an 81-Yard Cowl (or 103-Yard, or 151-Yard, or whatever) of your own. And if your fiber isn't chunky weight, just hit me up in the comments. This pattern is very easy to modify for any yarn you may have on hand!

Yarn: Berroco Versa (50% Cotton, 50% Acrylic; 81 yards [75 meters]/50 grams); #3692 Villa - one skein

A closer look at the ol' pattern.
No, it's not a terribly instructive picture. Sorry.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make this thing! With that in mind, cast on 76 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Since we're basically going to be knitting until we run out of yarn on this thing, we're not going to do any edging or anything. Instead, we'll get straight to the pattern, which is Rickrack Faggoting Stitch from page 260 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. And it goes like so:

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Baby Bear Hooded Cowl

Baby Bear Hooded Cowl
Size 7 - 12 (so it will fit more snugly on a larger child)

I think we've probably all seen some version of this hat, what with the ears, the hood, and the cute kid poking out and all. So here, by request, let me present my version: the Baby Bear Hooded Cowl, which knits up quickly on size US 10 needles and with chunky weight yarn. Of course, it's not just kids who deserve to look this cute, so I've also sized the thing from toddler to adult. Make one for your husband! He'll love it, I promise (note: my promise does not constitute a legal, binding agreement. In fact, make one for your husband at your own peril. Seriously.)!

Sizes: Toddler (Ages 4 - 6; Ages 7 - 12; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky Tweed (75% Acrylic, 22% Wool, 3% Rayon; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #T599 Brown - one skein (two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two skeins)

A closer look at the face hole.
Filled by one of the cutest little faces.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size 10, and one 24" circular needle in size US 10 if you're knitting size 7 - 12 or larger

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

So let's get started! Using your 16" size 10 circular needle, then, cast on 64 (68; 72; 76; 80) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following edging rows:

Edging Rows 1 - 3: purl

And once those bad boys are done, knit 2" (3.5"; 5"; 7"; 9") in stockinette. Switch to your size 9 needle, and we'll do a few ribbing rows before we move on to the hood, like so:

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Cute & Cabled Baby Bib

Cute & Cabled Baby Bib

I have had this yarn in my stash for an embarrassingly long time - I bought it over a year ago with the intention of turning it into a cowl, and then promptly forgot about it. When I ran across it at the end of a hectic week, however, I realized that it would be perfect for a quick-knitting project like this one. So I conceived of the Cute & Cabled Baby Bib, which is thick, cute, detailed but not too difficult to knit, and works up in a snap. Also, I'm pretty sure you could get two bibs out of one skein, although I haven't tried it (yet).

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Jeannee Chunky (51% Cotton, 49% Acrylic; 106 yards [97 meters]/100 grams); #10 Blue - one skein

A close-up of the side detail.
After a long debate, I used
decreases for shaping
instead of short rows.
Needles: One set of straight needles in size US 10 and two double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10, for working the i-cord ties

Notions: Tapestry needle, two stitch markers

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches 

So let's make a bib! First of all, then, using your size 10 needles, cast on 29 stitches loosely. Then, we'll knit the following two set-up rows: 

Set-up Row 1 (wrong side): knit

Set-up Row 2: p9, place marker, p11, place marker, purl until end of row 

And once those rows are done, it's time to begin our pattern, which includes some shaping and also a strip of "Opening" Double Cable from page 113 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. At any rate, we'll be continuing like so:

Row 1 (wrong side): purl until you reach first marker, slip marker, k2, p7, k2, slip marker, purl until end of row

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Spring Shadows Hat

Spring Shadows Hat

Well, what can I say about this hat? First and foremost, I guess, Malabrigo still makes a damn fine yarn. And with that out of the way, I should also mention that this hat has more openwork than it might initially appear - basically, all of the stuff between the braids is mesh. So it's a great change-of-seasons number, if I do say so myself.

Yarn: Malabrigo Mecha (100% Merino Superwash Wool ; 130 yards [120 meters]/100 grams); #875 Arapey - one skein

A braid, and some nice mesh.
In short, a lovely spring hat!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10.5, and a cable needle (cn), or dpn for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches on size 10.5 needles

So let's make a hat! First, then, using your size 9 needle, cast on 65 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some edging rows, as follows:

Edging Row: * (p1, k1) four times, p1, k2, p1, k1; rep from *

Knit this edging row until piece measures just over 1". Then we'll knit the following transition row: