Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Banded Cable Beanie

Banded Cable Beanie

Sometimes a good hat needs no introduction. Or at least that's what I'm telling myself today because, quite frankly, I don't feel like writing one. Nevertheless, I will tell you that this hat works up quickly and reasonably easily for a cabled number and is suitable for the larger-headed amongst us (as well as the smaller-headed, although it won't be overly snug). It's also pretty snappy looking, if I do say so myself.

Yarn: Berroco Vintage Chunky (52% Acrylic, 40% Wool, 8% Nylon; 136 yards [125 meters]/100 grams); #6146 Azure - one skein

A better look at the decrease.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles (dpn), also in size US 10, and a cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make a hat! Using your size 9 needle, then, cast on 75 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work our ribbing as follows:

Ribbing Row: * (k1, p1) twice, k1; rep from *

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Float Flutter Fly Scarf

Float Flutter Fly Scarf

I know what you're thinking: Isn't this scarf named for a line in a song in an episode of The Backyardigans? And to that, I say: of course not! What do you think I am, some kind of lunatic? No, I am merely using these three delightfully alliterative words to remark on this scarf's floating ends and fluttering edges, as well as the fact that you'll fly through making this not-too-basic knit and purl design. Any presumed reference to Uniqua, Tasha, Tyrone, and Pablo's quest for a levitating stone is purely circumstantial.

Update as of January 27, 2016: A sharp-eyed commenter brought it to my attention that both my set-up row and my first pattern row were labeled wrong side. Therefore, I've chosen to omit the set-up row from the pattern. If you're halfway through and are lamenting this decision, please don't worry! I highly doubt you will notice the presence or absence of this row when you reach the end of the scarf; you'll be too busy twirling in it to notice. :)

Yarn: Berroco Folio (65% Superfine Alpaca, 35% Rayon; 219 yards [200 meters]/50 grams); #4563 Napa Valley - 2 skeins

A closer look at the knits and the purls.
And a mannequin's armpit.
Needles: Straight needles in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

And now, it's time to make a scarf! With that in mind, cast on 37 stitches loosely. Then we'll get straight to our pattern, which you'll find below. Note that it's a-okay to pull your yarn tight behind your 5 slipped stitches; this will help form that little ridge in the middle of the scarf.

Row 1 (wrong side): purl

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Bippity Boppity Beanie

Bippity Boppity Beanie

There are times when I feel like a perfectly ordinary adult woman going about her life in a perfectly ordinary fashion. Then I get terrible ideas (such as naming this hat the Bippity Boppity Beanie) and I JUST CAN'T LET THEM GO. Then it's clear that something went wrong somewhere. I blame my mother. 

Something I can't blame her for, however, is how magical this hat turned out (hence the name). Made with a basic striped knit and purl design, this hat's texture is both incredibly easy to achieve and optical illusion-tastic. So if you're ready to knit up a little magic, I highly recommend this beanie. Yes, it's unfortunate that you won't be able to tell your friends the name of the pattern out of sheer embarrassment. But perhaps you can just email them a link.*

* Double bonus: I made this hat with the leftovers from the Another Brick Cowl. Just in case you're bundle knitting for the holidays!

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8891 Cyan Blue - one skein (color A) & #9421 Blue Hawaii - one skein (color B)

A closer look. The pattern manages to give an
appearance of vertical color stripes despite the
fact they're horizontal.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6, one 16" circular needle in size US 5, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles 

So let's make a hat! First, then, using your size 5 needle and your color A yarn, cast on 114 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k3, p3; rep from *

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Little Tent Hat

Little Tent Hat

I'm paying the piper with this pattern - and, by "the piper," I mean my eldest son, who has learned that he only needs to bat his sweet little eyes at the yarn store to get almost any fiber he wants (I draw the line at novelty). So, he picked the yarn, and then we picked the pattern together; something whimsical and fun, but that would suit both children and adults. Speaking of which, I've designed this hat in four sizes, which should cover everyone from about 18 months to adult (because - scarily enough - there really isn't that much of a difference in head size). If you need any additional guidance choosing a size, just let me know in the comments! :)

Sizes: Toddler (Child; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns 128 Superwash (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 128 yards [117 meters]/100 grams); #1952 Blaze - one skein plus a little scrap white for the pompom (oh, and if you're making the adult large hat, you may need 2 skeins to complete the pompom)

A closer view of the little tents
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

And now that we know what we're working with, let's get started! Using your size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 60 (66; 72; 78) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some ribbing to get started, as follows:

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Another Brick Cowl

Another Brick Cowl

I created this week's design in response to another user request; specifically, I got feedback that someone was looking for a slipped stitch cowl pattern that used three colors, but in stripes rather than all at once (does that make any sense?). Anyway, I think it took me longer to settle on my color choices than it did on the slipped stitch pattern, especially since this one knits up beautifully and cleanly, without the stitch tugging effect that some such patterns can have. So, basically, if you're in the mood for a fun color project (or a scrap-buster; think what you could do with more colors!), this cowl might be just what you're looking for! :)

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8010 Beige - one skein (color A), #9421 Blue Hawaii - one skein (color B), & #8891 Cyan Blue - one skein (color C)

A closer view of the slipped stitch pattern
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6; one 16" circular needle in size US 5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles 

So let's make a cowl! First, then, using your size 5 needle and your color A yarn, cast on 120 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: using color A, * k2, p2; rep from *

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Winter's Eve Cowl

Winter's Eve Cowl

I've done everything in my power to post one new knitting pattern each Wednesday (something I maintained even through the birth of my youngest!), but this week finally broke me. My next project isn't quiiiiite done. Luckily, I can still share the Winter's Eve Cowl, which I just designed for AllFreeKnitting. You can find the link below. And I promise - to make up for it, next week's project will be a stunner!

Yarn: Lion Brand Yarns Hometown USA (94% Acrylic, 6% Rayon; 64 yards [59 meters]/113 grams); #202 Aspen Tweed – 3 skeins

A closer look at the pattern.
Knits and purls, baby, knits and purls.
Needles: straight needles in size US 13, straight needles in size US 15 for provisional cast on

Notions: tapestry needle

Gauge: 9 stitches = 4 inches on size US 13 needles

To make this little lovely, which uses the Kitchener stitch for a seamless, double-wrapping appearance, you'll actually need to head on over to the AllFreeKnitting website. And the link is right...

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Autumn Rose Cowl

Autumn Rose Cowl

While I love (virtually) all knitting, I especially love designing pieces with a certain person in mind. This cowl was inspired by one of my kids' teachers, who has definitely earned something extra through her kindness and patience despite my kids' occasionally, ahem, * energetic *, behavior. As an added bonus, this cowl's simple design shows off the beauty of the yarn, and is also suitable for beginning knitters or as something to keep your hands occupied during a good movie.

Yarn: Malabrigo Mechita (100% Merino Superwash; 420 yards [385 meters]/100 grams); #862 Piedras – one skein 

It's amazing what you can do with a few knits
and some purls!
Needles: One 16" or 20" circular needle in size US 2

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker


Gauge: 26 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 2 needles


Which brings us to the cowl-making! With that in mind, cast on 140 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll begin our edging rows, as follows:

Edging Rows 1 - 4: * k10, p10; rep from *

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Austrian Block Hat

Austrian Block Hat
Size Adult Small

I wish I had a super-good story for this hat, but I don't. Basically, I had the yarn (left over from the Little Red Hooded Cowl), I saw the stitch pattern, and the hat-baby I imagined would result from the combination of the two seemed neat. And, whaddya know, it IS neat, and makes a quick, unisex knit perfect for your last-minute holiday gifting needs (not that we're there yet!).

Sizes: Adult Small (Adult Large)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky (75% Acrylic, 22% Wool, 3% Rayon; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #999  - one skein 

A closer look at the pattern.
So blocky!
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 10

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

And now it's time to make a hat! Using your size 9 needle, then, cast on 70 (80) stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a ribbing row, as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p2, k2, p1, k2, p2; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 8 times (10 times) and transfer your work to your size 10 needle. Now it's time to begin the main pattern, which is a Austrian Block Pattern from page 146 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns. To do it, we'll need some terminology, as follows:

rt (right twist): knit two together, leaving stitches on left-hand needle; next, insert right-hand needle from the front between the two stitches just knitted together, and knit the first stitch again.  Finally, slip both stitches from left-hand needle together

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Lizard People Fingerless Gloves

Lizard People Fingerless Gloves

My husband had just one job with this project: to convince me not to call these mitts the "Lizard People Fingerless Gloves." Obviously, he failed. Luckily, it doesn't matter what I name them, since these fingerless gloves will remain beautifully textured and fun to make either way. So break out your favorite sport weight yarn and get started on a pair of fantastic gloves for all of your lizard friends!

Sizes: small (medium; large) (the small will fit a hand roughly 7 1/2" - 8" in circumference at the base of the thumb, the medium up to 8 3/4", and the large goes up to about 9.5")

Yarn: Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8910 Citron - one skein

A closer look at the pattern.
It's lizard-y, no?
Needles: One set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make some mitts! Using your size 5 needles, cast on 40 (44; 48) stitches loosely and then divide among three double-pointed needles as follows: 12 stitches, 16 stitches, 12 stitches (14 stitches, 16 stitches, 14 stitches; 16 stitches, 16 stitches, 16 stitches). Then we'll work a ribbing row as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row 6 times (all sizes). Transfer work to your size 6 needles. Then, we'll begin to incorporate a pattern stripe. All sizes can follow the same directions, below:

Row 1: knit

Row 2: knit across first needle, k4, p8, k4, knit across third needle

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Slipping into Winter Cowl

Slipping into Winter Cowl

It's been a while since I mentioned it, but it's still true: my four-year-old is still obsessed with pink. Therefore, any time I take him to the craft store, I leave with at least one skein of rose-colored yarn. And when he chose this fiber, I decided to pair the pink with a nice blue-green for a double-wrapping, super snuggly cowl. The graphic color pattern and thick yarn make this a fun, reasonably quick knit that's unapologetically snuggle-tastic.

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky (75% Acrylic, 25% Wool; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #029 Pastel Pink - one skein (color A), & #0670 Teal Heather - one skein (color B)
A closer version of the pattern.
As you can see, my slipped stitches
face opposite directions in the different
colors. Grafting, baby.

Needles: One 32" circular needle in size US 10, one 32" or longer circular needle in similar needle size (to hold one half of work for grafting) (also, you don't need this needle if you're going to knit straight through instead of grafting)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! Of course, before we get started, I should mention one thing. Namely, that I made this cowl in two halves and then grafted them together because I wanted the long slipped stitches in contrasting colors to face each other, rather than continue in the same direction (as you can see in the picture above). If you'd rather not graft a whole heck of a lot of stitches together and/or if you prefer to have all of your long slipped stitches oriented in the same direction, I'll give alternate directions for that option below. 

However, no matter which way you're making this thing, you will begin like so: using your 32" circular needle in size US 10 and your color A yarn, cast on 138 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit a few edging rows, like so:

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Build-Your-Own DK Weight Hat

Build-Your-Own DK Weight Hat

I designed this pattern with one goal in mind; namely, that it could be the first in-the-round project for a beginning knitter who had learned how to knit and purl but not much else. Or in other words, it's supposed to be a tutorial. Of course, you don't have to be a beginning knitter to enjoy it - with a basic design like this, there's all sorts of customization you can add. Throw in stripes or a stitch pattern with a 2-, 4-, or 8-stitch repeat, and you can turn this basic little hat into another beast entirely! Or, add a few inches and omit the knit rows in the decrease and you'll have a gathered crown. And add a few extra inches to THAT and it's slouchy as well!!!!

Oh, and another thing, guys - this is my first tutorial style pattern. So if I seem to be missing an instruction, please let me know! We can make it perfect together. :)

Sizes: 12 Months (Toddler; Child; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult) 

A closer view of the crown.
Yarn: Malabrigo Rastita (100% Merino Wool; 310 yards [285 meters]/100 grams); #850 Archangel - one skein (all sizes)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5; one 16" circular needle in size US 6, and one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches on size 6 needles 

Let's make a hat, shall we? First, a note about the sizing. As with virtually any sized knitting pattern, I will give directions in the same order as the sizes appear above. If you're making an adult small, for instance, you'll always use the direction second from the end of the line (or in other words, you'll be casting on 112 stitches here in a moment). My only tip with this direction is that it can be useful to print your pattern and highlight the correct sizes if you're knitting something with a lot of them - otherwise, the numbers can run together. So go ahead and do that if need be. And, once you're done, it's time to get down to business!

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Dot Knot Cowl

Dot Knot Cowl

I've been on a clean design kick lately, so when I saw this understated stitch pattern I just knew I had to try it. From there, it was just a matter of choosing a yarn and an edging to match (the top edging is also rolled down, which adds a fun touch). One word of caution, however; I wouldn't knit this pattern with a darkly-colored yarn, as the stitch pattern would probably get swallowed up in the hue.

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cotton Rich DK (64% Cotton, 36% Nylon; 135.60 yards [124 meters]/50 grams); #2730 - two skeins

A closer look at the dotty little pattern.
Subtle, but nice!

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! To do it, we'll cast on 114 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll get to our edging stitch, which is Close Stitch from page 94 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns. And it goes like so:

Edging Row 1: purl

Edging Row 2: * slip 1 with yarn in back (sl1 wyib), k1; rep from *

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Rickrack Braid Hat

Rickrack Braid Hat

The first thing I should mention (before I forget to) is that I designed this hat to match the 81-Yard Cowl. However, I didn't want to go too matchy-matchy, so the hat uses a stripe of stockinette that's two stitches wide rather than the cowl's single stitch. Nevertheless, if made in the same yarn these two items would make for a handsome pair. And an economical one, since this hat uses almost the same yardage as the cowl!!!

Yarn: Schachenmayr smc Boston (70% Acrylic, 30% Virgin Wool; 60 yards [55 meters]/50 grams); #72 Pine - two skeins (I know I just said this hat uses the same yardage as the cowl - that's 'cause I didn't use all of my two skeins!!)

Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10.5, one set of double pointed needles, also in size US 10.5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 12 stitches = 4 inches

Which brings us to the pattern! Using your size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 64 stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit some ribbing, as follows:

Ribbing Row 1: * k1, p2, k1; rep from *

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Floral Mesh Beanie

Floral Mesh Beanie

I've been posting a lot of user-suggested patterns recently, and the Floral Mesh Beanie is no exception. After completing the Floral Mesh Scarf and Bonnet, I've had requests for a simpler hat as well. And while this stitch pattern doesn't lend itself quite as seamlessly to the round as I would like, that's just because I'm a perfectionist. In practice, you'd never find the seam, although you will have to do a bit stitch-slipping to keep the thing lined up correctly.

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn DK Merino Superwash (100% Superwash Fine Merino Wool; 130 yards [119 meters]/50 grams); #1122 Wisteria - one to two skeins (I got by with one)

The Floral Mesh pattern.
I still love it, guys.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 5, one 16" circular needle in size US 6, one set of double pointed needles (dpns), also in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size 6 needle

So let's make a hat! Since the lace pattern on this hat has a larger gauge than your ribbing, it's one of the few instances where you'll be casting on more stitches, and then decreasing before you hit the mesh. With that in mind, and using your size 5 16" needle, then, cast on 112 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll work a ribbing row as follows:

Ribbing Row: * k1, p1, k2, p1, k1, p1; rep from *

Knit this ribbing row until piece measures roughly 1.5". Transfer work to your size 6" circular needle, and we'll knit two transition rows, as follows:

Transition Row 1: * k1, p1, k2tog, p1, k1, p1 * (96 stitches)

Transition Row 2: knit

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Little Red Hooded Cowl

Little Red Hooded Cowl
Size 4 - 6, on a giant-headed 4-year-old

So here's the thing. I made the Baby Bear Hooded Cowl for my six-year-old, and then my four-year-old demanded a similar hat of his own. And while many elements of the two designs are the same (I made them with the same weight yarn and same basic premise), the Little Red Hooded Cowl adds a cute little cable, just for fun. That same cable also makes it fit a tad snugger than the Baby Bear Hooded Cowl, which also gives it a slightly different look.

Note: As of 1/14/17, I've corrected the cast on number for the large adult. :)

Sizes: Toddler (Ages 4 - 6; Ages 7 - 12; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky (75% Acrylic, 22% Wool, 3% Rayon; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #999  - one skein (two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two skeins)

A closer look at the cable.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, cable needle (cn)

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

So let's get started! Using your 16" size 9 circular needle, then, cast on 64 (68; 72; 76; 80) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following ribbing row:

Ribbing Row: p3, k6, p2, * k2, p2; rep from * until you have 13 stitches left in round, then k2, p2, k6, p3

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Sailor's Rib Fingerless Gloves

Sailor's Rib Fingerless Gloves

Did you knit the Sailor's Rib Cowl, but still can't find anything to wear with it? Never fear, these Sailor's Rib Fingerless Gloves will do just the trick! Made with a reinforced palm and plenty of ribbing to keep them snug around the wrists and fingers, these mitts are sturdy, stylish, and warm. They are also suitable for either a man or a woman, with three sizes for your knitting pleasure.

Sizes: small (medium; large) - directions for larger sizes will follow those for the smaller size in parentheses (and, for clarification, the small is for a hand roughly 7" - 7.5" in circumference at the base of the thumb, medium for 7.5" - 8.25", and large for 8.25" - 9")

Yarn: Cascade Yarns Cascade 220 (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 220 yards [200 meters]/100 grams); #9458 Bainbridge Island Heather - 1 skein

Needles: one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 5, one set of dpns in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches on size 7 needles

And with that, let's make some gloves! These mitts are designed as mirror images, so we'll work them one at a time, as follows.

Monday, August 31, 2015

Pansy Path Socks

Pansy Path Socks

I was recently presented with the opportunity to design another pattern for our friends at AllFreeKnitting, complete with this Lion Brand Sock-Ease yarn. And, long story short, this is what I came up with - a dainty color pattern that completes a clean design. I also knit one of these bad boys on 9" circulars, which I quite enjoyed (especially with this eensy weensy yarn). Anyway, you'll have to visit AllFreeKnitting to find the pattern for now (link below), but you can find all kinds of pictures right here in the meantime!

Sizes: adult small (adult medium; adult large) (small corresponds to the following US shoe sizes: women's 5 - 7 and men's 4 - 6, medium corresponds to women's 8 - 10 and men's 7 - 9, and large corresponds to women's 11 - 14 and men's 10 - 13)

Yarn: Lion Brand Yarns Sock-Ease (75% Wool, 25% Nylon; 438 yards [400 meters]/100 grams); #100 Marshmallow - one skein (color A), #174 Green Apple – one skein (color B), & #139 Lollipop – one skein (color C) 

A closer view of these little snockerinos.
Needles: one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size US 1, one set of double pointed needles in size US 2

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch holder or scrap of yarn for holding stitches

Gauge: 30 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette on size US 2 needles


I know, I know - you really just want the pattern, huh? Well feast your eyes on the photos I've included below and then click through to find out how to make these sweet little guys!








 

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

81-Yard Cowl

81-Yard Cowl

If you're looking for a true one-skein knitting pattern, then you've come to the right place; the 81-Yard Cowl is designed to use, quite literally, one and only one skein of yarn. And the inspiration behind the pattern was the yarn itself - although I bought it a few years ago, I've never been able to find the exact right use for it until I just decided to make something, already! So for all of you out there with one odd skein and no purpose in sight, I encourage you to make an 81-Yard Cowl (or 103-Yard, or 151-Yard, or whatever) of your own. And if your fiber isn't chunky weight, just hit me up in the comments. This pattern is very easy to modify for any yarn you may have on hand!

Yarn: Berroco Versa (50% Cotton, 50% Acrylic; 81 yards [75 meters]/50 grams); #3692 Villa - one skein

A closer look at the ol' pattern.
No, it's not a terribly instructive picture. Sorry.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 10.5

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make this thing! With that in mind, cast on 76 stitches loosely, place marker, and join in round. Since we're basically going to be knitting until we run out of yarn on this thing, we're not going to do any edging or anything. Instead, we'll get straight to the pattern, which is Rickrack Faggoting Stitch from page 260 of Barbara G. Walker's A Second Treasury of Knitting Patterns, except adapted for the round. And it goes like so:

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Baby Bear Hooded Cowl

Baby Bear Hooded Cowl
Size 7 - 12 (so it will fit more snugly on a larger child)

I think we've probably all seen some version of this hat, what with the ears, the hood, and the cute kid poking out and all. So here, by request, let me present my version: the Baby Bear Hooded Cowl, which knits up quickly on size US 10 needles and with chunky weight yarn. Of course, it's not just kids who deserve to look this cute, so I've also sized the thing from toddler to adult. Make one for your husband! He'll love it, I promise (note: my promise does not constitute a legal, binding agreement. In fact, make one for your husband at your own peril. Seriously.)!

Sizes: Toddler (Ages 4 - 6; Ages 7 - 12; Teen/Small Adult; Large Adult)

Yarn: Plymouth Yarn Encore Chunky Tweed (75% Acrylic, 22% Wool, 3% Rayon; 143 yards [131 meters]/100 grams); #T599 Brown - one skein (two skeins; two skeins; two skeins; two skeins)

A closer look at the face hole.
Filled by one of the cutest little faces.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 9, one 16" circular needle in size US 10, one set of double pointed needles (dpns) in size 10, and one 24" circular needle in size US 10 if you're knitting size 7 - 12 or larger

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 14 stitches = 4 inches on size 10 needles 

So let's get started! Using your 16" size 10 circular needle, then, cast on 64 (68; 72; 76; 80) stitches, place marker, and join in round. Then we'll knit the following edging rows:

Edging Rows 1 - 3: purl

And once those bad boys are done, knit 2" (3.5"; 5"; 7"; 9") in stockinette. Switch to your size 9 needle, and we'll do a few ribbing rows before we move on to the hood, like so:

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Interrupted Stripe Cowl

Interrupted Stripe Cowl

Sometimes I want to make a fancy-pants project with an intricate stitch pattern and a lot of shaping. And sometimes I just want to make a basic, straightforward cowl while I watch bad television and put up my feet. The Interrupted Stripe Cowl is just such a project, using three colors of worsted weight yarn and nothing more complicated than your basic knit and purl. And the best part is that it still looks (at least a little bit) fancy!

Yarn: Berroco Fuji (38% Silk, 25% Cotton, 22% Rayon, 15% Nylon; 125 yards [115 meters]/50 grams); #9203 Sandy - one skein (color A), #9247 Pacific - one skein (color B), & #9263 Deep Sea - one skein (color C)

A close-up of the stripes. Interrupted.
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 7

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch marker

Gauge: 20 stitches = 4 inches

So let's make a cowl! Using your color A yarn, then, cast on 110 stitches, place marker, and join in round. And then we'll continue like so: 

Row 1: using color A, knit

Row 2: using color A, purl

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Ribbon Cable Socks

Ribbon Cable Socks

It's been days, at least, since I last mentioned my obsession with Malabrigo yarn. Therefore I'll this opportunity to say it again: I am obsessed with Malabrigo yarn. Especially this lovely Arroyo fiber, a sport-weight superwash that, for me at least, knit up slightly smaller than gauge. And speaking of gauge, these socks are designed for a sport-weight fiber, but you will, as always with something as finicky as socks, want to check your gauge. And remember that your dpn knitting will probably look better on a thicker fiber knit with smaller needles than the opposite, so I would definitely try to gauge down a slightly larger fiber before I'd try to gauge up a finer fiber. Am I making any sense here? Feel free to hit me up with questions in the comments; in the meantime, let's get to the pattern.

Update: Please note that I updated gusset rows 6 & 12 and body rows 2 & 8 on May 31, 2017. :)

Sizes: adult small (adult medium; adult large) (for the record, small corresponds to the following US shoe sizes: women's 5 - 7 and men's 4 - 6, medium corresponds to women's 8 - 10 and men's 7 - 9, and large corresponds to women's 11 - 14 and men's 10 - 13)

Yarn: Malabrigo Arroyo (100% Superwash Merino Wool; 335 yards [305 meters]/100 grams); #046 Prussia Blue - one skein

A better view of the ol' snockerinos.
Not that anybody calls them that.
Needles: One set of double pointed needles in size US 4, cable needle (cn) or dpn for cabling

Notions: Tapestry needle, stitch holder or scrap of yarn for holding stitches

Gauge: 24 stitches = 4 inches in stockinette

So let's make some socks! Of course, before we get to that, I should mention that I'm using Ann Budd's delightful Getting Started Knitting Socks (Getting Started series) for the sizing and basic design elements of these socks, as well as a couple of Ribbon Stitch cables from page 245 of Barbara G. Walker's A Treasury of Knitting Patterns for the stitch pattern. And now that that's covered, let's actually make those socks!

First, then, using a Long-Tail or an Old Norwegian Cast-On (for stretch) and your dpns, cast on 48 (52; 56) stitches, divide between 3 dpns as follows: 15, 18, 15 ([17, 18, 17]; [19, 18, 19]), and join in round. And since we're getting straight to the pattern, we'll need the following notation:

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Jardin Cowl

Jardin Cowl

Okay, I've committed a cardinal knitting sin with this cowl. Namely, I've called for two skeins even though I BARELY needed any of the second one to complete it. However, I just couldn't bear to finish this brightly colored beauty early, so I sucked it up and went for the second hank. On the plus side, that means that those of you using a different yarn for the Jardin Cowl will only need about 200 yards (and could probably squeak by at 175 as well). And if you want to use the same yarn, well, you'll face the same choice I did; quit early with one skein or find another use for what's left over (which, let's face it, you'll almost certainly be seeing sooner or later on this site anyway).

Yarn: Cascade 220 Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 164 yards [150 meters]/50 grams); #8910 Citron - two skeins

A better look at the cables.
Pretty little things, aren't they?
Needles: One 16" circular needle in size US 6

Notions: Tapestry needle, three stitch markers

Gauge: 22 stitches = 4 inches

So let's get started! Using your circular needle, cast on 148 stitches loosely. Then we'll knit one marker placement row, as follows:

Marker Placement Row: k62, place marker, (p2, k9) twice, p2, place marker, knit until end of round

And once that little beast is done, we'll move straight to our pattern, which incorporates a strip of Round Link Cables from page 132 of Barbara G. Walker's Charted Knitting Designs: A Third Treasury of Knitting Patterns, as well as some decreases for shaping. So first we'll define our terminology, as follows:

round link cable (rlc): slip 6 stitches to cn and hold in front, k3, then slip the middle 3 stitches (of the 9 total) from cn back to left-hand needle; move cn with final 3 stitches to the back of the work; k3 from left-hand needle, then k3 from cn

And then we'll work like so: